Flying Officer Jack Carter and his Lancaster KB760, NA-P for “Panic.”

Clarence Simonsen’s research is always interesting even if it takes time to read. There will be a follow-up on this post since someone took a lot of pleasure in reading all what Clarence wrote about KB760.

 

Bob Boyle & Wife with Pete Jenner1991

Preserving the Past

The First Vintage Flying Wings of Canada at Calgary, Alberta
Research by Clarence Simonsen
Part Two
Flying Officer Jack Carter and his Lancaster KB760, NA-P for “Panic.”

Arthur John Edward “Jack” Carter was born in Wadena, Saskatchewan, on 16 April 1922. He graduated from High School in 1939, and enlisted in the RCAF at Saskatoon, Sask., on 8 May 1941. He spent four weeks at a manning depot where he was interviewed, tested, and lectured, plus long hours of drill where he learned to salute and march for the salary of $1.30 per day. After recruit training, he moved a step higher when he was selected for pilot training, which took him to three different training schools.

Jack was first posted to No. 4 Initial Training School, Edmonton, Alberta, graduated 5 August 1941, and arrived at No. 5 E.F.T.S. at Lethbridge, Alberta, where he graduated on 25 September 1941.

His…

View original post 7,334 more words

Advertisements

The Mexican 201st Fighter Squadron – Part Three

The Mexican 201st Fighter Squadron – Part Three (by Clarence Simonsen)

Lest We Forget

Editor’s Note –

This unsigned article was obtained by Clarence Simonsen in 1983. It is a reprint of the original from the archives of the Albert F. Simpson Historical Research Center, Maxwell Air Force Base, at Alabama. It was prepared by the Historical Section, Administration and Service Division, Headquarters, Second Air Force, 20 September 1945. It is reproduced [black text] for the historical and detailed progress of the forming and training of the Mexican 201st Fighter Squadron, including the training in the United States. Small sections from author [Simonsen] information appear in blue type. Hyperlinks, if any, will be in red.

If possible, I will add some pictures found on different Websites as I go along editing Clarence’s story. 

The Mexican 201st Fighter Squadron – [August 1944 to March 1945]

First Mission

The first mission on the morning of 7 June 1945, found 10/10 cloud cover over the target…

View original post 2,886 more words

The Mexican 201st Fighter Squadron – Part Two

The Mexican 201st Fighter Squadron – Part Two (by Clarence Simonsen)

Lest We Forget

Editor’s Note –

This unsigned article was obtained by Clarence Simonsen in 1983. It is a reprint of the original from the archives of the Albert F. Simpson Historical Research Center, Maxwell Air Force Base, at Alabama. It was prepared by the Historical Section, Administration and Service Division, Headquarters, Second Air Force, 20 September 1945. It is reproduced [black text] for the historical and detailed progress of the forming and training of the Mexican 201st Fighter Squadron, including the training in the United States. Small sections from author [Simonsen] information appear in blue type. Hyperlinks, if any, will be in red.

Whenever possible I will add some pictures found on different Websites as I go along editing Clarence’s story. 

The Mexican 201st Fighter Squadron – [August 1944 to March 1945]

American Aid for 201st Mexican Squadron

The full cost of housing and messing for the 201st enlisted men…

View original post 4,311 more words

The Mexican 201st Fighter Squadron – Part One

The Mexican 201st Fighter Squadron – Part One (by Clarence Simonsen)

Lest We Forget

Editor’s Note –

This unsigned article was obtained by Clarence Simonsen in 1983. It is a reprint of the original from the archives of the Albert F. Simpson Historical Research Center, Maxwell Air Force Base, at Alabama. It was prepared by the Historical Section, Administration and Service Division, Headquarters, Second Air Force, 20 September 1945. It is reproduced [black text] for the historical and detailed progress of the forming and training of the Mexican 201st Fighter Squadron, including the training in the United States. Small sections from author [Simonsen] information appear in blue type. Hyperlinks will be in red.

I will add some pictures found on different Websites as I go along editing Clarence’s story. 

The Mexican 201st Fighter Squadron – [August 1944 to March 1945]

Organization

Soon after the Republic of Mexico declared war on Germany, 28 May 1942, plans were made for the organization of the 201

View original post 611 more words

The Mexican 201st Fighter Squadron – Introduction (by Clarence Simonsen)

The Mexican 201st Fighter Squadron – Introduction (by Clarence Simonsen)

Lest We Forget

Note – In 1983, I obtained an unsigned article. It was a reprint of the original from the archives of the Albert F. Simpson Historical Research Center, Maxwell Air Force Base, at Alabama. It was prepared by the Historical Section, Administration and Service Division, Headquarters, Second Air Force, 20 September 1945. It will be reproduced in black text for the historical and detailed progress of the forming and training of the Mexican 201st Fighter Squadron, including the training in the United States. Small sections from my own research will appear in blue type.

In March 1992, I was lucky to be invited to the home of Cor. FAPA [retired] Carlos Garduno Nunez, one of the original pilots who commanded Escadrille “B”. Many of the attached blue notes resulted from this old interview. In the 1960s Col. Carlos Garduno piloted Mexican President Adolfo Lopez Mateos in his 707 airliner.

Author and Colonel Garduno in his home 1992

Author and Col. Garduno in his home…

View original post 225 more words

Let’s turn back the clock…

Not sure you are interested… was a post written on my main blog Lest We Forget in January 2015.

It was about something Clarence wrote me about not being sure…


Not sure you are interested…

That’s what Clarence Simonsen wrote me yesterday when he sent me a 25-page story.

Hello Pierre,

Hope you had a enjoyable holiday.

This is the history of the Mexican Air Force in WWII, which has been setting in my basement. Last winter it was updated and three new paintings completed in Mexico.

Use if you wish. I will send the info. for paintings only if you want. This will require some editing.

Clarence

I said I was interested.

Hi Pierre,

This is the info. for the two paintings showing the first Mexican attack on a German U-boat. The other is the insignia of the Mexican 201st Fighter Squadron. In all three paintings I have incorporated the image of original Aztec art in the world famous museum in Mexico City. I have been there three times and it you ever get the chance, it is a must see. Just amazing displays.

This is no use setting in my basement, so it might help out someone.

Clarence

DSC08209_crop
Insignia of the Mexican 201st Fighter Squadron
DSC08204_crop
First Mexican attack on a German U-boat
DSC08200_crop
Now what about that 25-pages story?
I have to read it and enjoy it first.
***

Clarence is somewhat passionate about nose art, aviation, and history.
At first I told him I could post his stories on Lest We Forget. But as his passion grew Lest We Forget had little space left to post his stories as well as mine.
I “had to” create Lest We Forget II and his own blog Preserving the Past.
“Had to” is a pretty strong expression since I am also passionate about aviation, history and creating blogs.
So why am I writing all this on a Saturday night, October 7, 2017. 
Maybe because of this upcoming story from Clarence about this picture?

Epilogue – A Journey Into the Past

Post by Pierre Lagacé

Clarence Simonsen has done an incredible research using Gordon Hill’s photos.

This is probably the most interesting photograph in the hundreds of photos in Gordon McKenzie Hill’s collection.

At least in my own humble opinion…

This is what Clarence wrote about it.

Gordon Hill was sent to the RCAF Release Deport in Winnipeg, Manitoba, and met up with an old High School friend who was graduating from the University of Manitoba. Gordon became her escort for the evening, and had his photo taken after the dinner. The other males at his table have spent the past four years studying at University, while Gordon was flying around the world, fighting for Canada. I wonder if they had any idea what he had seen and done for them.

“I wonder if they had any idea what he had seen and done for them.”

I don’t know if these people had any idea what he had seen and done for them, because I did not ask Clarence if Gordon Hill had talked that much about that photo.

I don’t know also if he had talked that much about the war with his relatives before he met Clarence. But I glad he did talk to Clarence because I have learned so much about many 416 Squadron pilots and especially about the French Connection who were “damn good pilots” according to Gordon Hill.

“Lou” Nault, “Pic” Picard, “Jack” Menard and “Lou” Brouillard now will always be remembered on Preserving the Past thanks to “Gord”.

“Lou” Jean, another French-Canadian Spitfire pilot, will also be remembered.

On the left is F/O M. R. “Mush” Sharun. On the wing is F/L D. W. Harling. Below is F/O W.F. Bridgman, then F/O W.D. “Wally” Hill and F/O Gordon “Gord” Hill, W/O L. J. “Lou” Jean, F/L W. R. “Webb” Harten, F/O J. Leyland and F/O R.W. “Tap” Tapley.

W/O L. J. “Lou” Jean

This is one of the reasons I colorised that picture. W/O L. J. “Lou” Jean was a “damn good pilot”.

I colorised it also to pay homage  to the three pilots who never came back from the war.

Their stories are here on Preserving the Past.

Use the search button to look for them…

F/L D. W. Harling…

 

F/O W.F. Bridgman…

F/L W. R. “Webb” Harten…

I wonder if some of the French Connection pilots shared what they did during the war with their relatives.