Tag Archives: Hawker Hurricane

“Crabapple” Fighter, Hurricane Mk. XII, serial #814, RCAF 5389

Editor’s note

This post was already published on Preserving the Past.

“Crabapple” Fighter, Hurricane Mk. XII, serial #814, RCAF 5389

There are more than 160 posts on this blog created so Clarence Simonsen could share his research.

In 2016 I was amazed by his first research that the more Clarence was sending what he had done the more I felt it was important to publish what he had researched.

This is just a sample of what he wanted to share.

Pierre Lagacé


Exclusive research done by Clarence Simonsen about the little History of “Crabapple” Fighter, Hurricane Mk. XII, serial #814, RCAF 5389


“Crabapple” Fighter, Hurricane Mk. XII, serial #814, RCAF 5389

By Clarence Simonsen

RCAF Hurricane 5389 was constructed by the Canadian Car and Foundry factory in Fort William, Ontario, on the western tip of Lake Superior in May 1942.

The first production Hurricane Mk. XII aircraft serial RCAF 5376 was retained at the factory in Fort William for testing and was not assigned to the RCAF until taken on strength 6 August 1943. The next 25 production new Hurricane Mk. XII [serial 5377 to 5401] aircraft were flown directly by No. 124 ferry pilots to No. 4 Training Command at Calgary, Alberta, or their Ferry Detachment at Lethbridge, Alberta, then later assigned to No. 133 [Falcon] Squadron which was formed at Lethbridge, Alberta, on 3 June 1942.

The first Air Force Ferry Squadron was formed at Air Force Headquarters, RCAF Station, Rockcliffe, [Ottawa] Ontario, on 24 December 1941, Organization Order 173, Flight Lieutenant H. O. Madden [C1407] was approved as the first Ferry Squadron Commander. On 14 February 1942, they were officially numbered No. 124 [Ferry] Squadron, formed for the purpose of inter-command ferrying of all RCAF aircraft across Canada, with detachments located in Eastern Division at Moncton, New Brunswick, Montreal, Quebec, Megantic, Quebec, Malton, [Toronto] Ontario, North Bay, Ontario, Kapuskasing, Ontario, and Western Division at Armstrong, Ontario, Regina, Saskatchewan, Lethbridge, Alberta, Cranbrook, B.C. and Penticton, B.C. The Daily Diary records the first ferry aircraft were Oxford AT533 and AS6596 delivered to R.A.F. Station Penhold, Alberta, on 4 January 1942, before they were officially numbered 124 [Ferry] Squadron.

The month of June 1942, became a busy period for No. 124 [Ferry] Squadron as new Canadian built Hawker Hurricane Mk. XII aircraft were being delivered from the factory in Fort William to new formed units in Eastern and Western Canada. The Daily Diary records the number of aircraft delivered but no aircraft individual serial number is recorded. The No. 124 squadron ferry pilot who delivered Hurricane 5389 is not known, however this fighter was taken on charge by RCAF on 23 June 1942, and assigned to No. 133 [F] Squadron in the next few days.

Hurricane aircraft serial 5377 to 5382 were taken on charge by the RCAF 16 January 1942, and later in June delivered by 124 [Ferry] Squadron to No. 133 at Lethbridge, AB, which is recorded in the Daily Diary of squadron operations. Between 24 June and 30 June 1942, No. 124 Squadron will ferry 53 aircraft to allotted units and a large percentage are new Hurricane fighters, including 5389.

This RCAF photo [PL12324] which was a posed image taken at No. 133 Squadron at Lethbridge, Alberta, records two new Hurricane aircraft #5383 without code letter and #5398 [March of Dimes] with code “L” painted on fuselage. This was most likely taken around the end of July 1942, when the squadron was busy with training and painting code letters on their new Hurricane fighters.

The No. 133 Daily Diary records the following for 17 July 1942 – Hurricane “March of Dimes” aircraft No. 5398, together with No. 5395 arrived at his unit at 19:00 hrs from Fort William, Ontario.

Hurricane # 5398 was first ferried to Calgary from Fort William on 15 July 1942 and was officially taken on charge by the RCAF. This was a special presentation aircraft with the “March of Dimes” painted on both sides of the nose panel in white lettering.

Photo taken at No. 4 Training Command Headquarters, Calgary, Alberta, 15 July 1942.

No. 133 Squadron Commanding Officer received the new presentation fighter at Lethbridge, Alberta, 17 July 1942, newspaper clipping on left. The nose lettering reads – ‘CONTRIBUTIONS TO CANADA “MARCH OF DIMES” HELPED TO PURCHASE THE AEROPLANE.’

On 4 February 1943, No. 133 [Falcon] Squadron were based at Boundary Bay. B.C., conducting normal patrols and training exercises. P/O Grover Stewart Sargent, J11976, was assigned a night time map reading exercise [flying Hurricane 5398, “L”] to the training area at Pender Island, then west to Patricia Bay, fuel, and return to base at Boundary Bay. He never arrived at Patricia Bay and the next morning his body was recovered near Pender Island. The crash site has never been found, and the cause is unknown. The body of Pilot Officer Sargent, age 20 years, was returned to Quebec, where he was buried in Lake View Cemetery, Pointe-Claire, Quebec.

All Hurricane fighters were painted at Fort William in R.A.F. colors for period June 1940 to June 1942.

Aircraft code letters were painted on at assigned RCAF units as shown above.

This records the correct 1942 roundel markings on the Canadian Hurricane fighters that were delivered from Fort William to RCAF Home War Establishment units. Upper roundel was type “B” red and blue, under wing was type “A. II” and fuselage was type A. I, red, white, blue and matt yellow.

Hurricane RCAF 5389 was the thirteenth fighter delivered to the RCAF and taken on charge 23 June 1942 at Calgary, Alberta, delivered to Lethbridge two days later. The fighter was painted with the code letter “M” and began general pilot training on 1 July 42, where Hurricane flying time was recorded at 23:15 hrs. On 2 July 42, Wing Commander Gray arrived by air at 11:00 hrs to arrange the allotment of three No. 133 Hurricane aircraft for pilot training at No. 135 Squadron at Mossbank, Saskatchewan. On 8 July 42, RCAF Hurricane 5385, 5386 and 5389 were transferred to No. 135 [Bulldog] Squadron at Mossbank, Saskatchewan for pilot training. They arrived at Mossbank the next day, recorded in Diary. Pilots were S/L Brookes, P/O Sargent, [killed 4 February 1943, March of Dimes] and F/Sgt. Shavalier.

[It is recorded in the No. 135 [Bulldog] Squadron Daily Diary that all pilots had been fully trained and soloed in the Hurricane fighter aircraft by 17 July 1942. It should also be recorded that Hurricane 5389 trained many of the first RCAF fighter pilots in No. 135 ‘Bulldog’ Squadron].
It is most likely Hurricane 5389 received a new 135 squadron code letter, and possibly even the nose art of the 135 “Bulldog” appeared on her engine covering for a few weeks.

No. 135 pilot George Lawson in front of Hurricane “U”, at Mossbank, Sask., 13 July 1942, which could possibly be one of the loaned fighters, 5386, 5385 or [Calgary] 5389, with Bulldog nose art.

On 26 July 1942, Hurricane 5385 and 5389 are returned to No. 133 Squadron from Mossbank, Sask. RCAF Hurricane 5386 returns to Lethbridge on 31 July 42.

27 July 1942, Mr. E. J. Sousby, General Manager of Canadian Car and Foundry Co. arrives for a special meeting to discuss the new Hurricane aircraft. The following day all Hurricane Mk. XII aircraft are being tested by the flying instructors for a detailed report on their general condition, which will be sent to the Fort William factory.

On 31 July 1942, Officer Commanding No. 133 Squadron, S/Leader W. T. Brooks, reports 24 Hurricane and 6 Harvard aircraft on strength, only 9 Hurricane fighters are serviceable. 28 August 1942, at 15:20 hrs. Hurricane 5380 makes a crash landing on aerodrome and is a total loss. F/Sgt. Pilot E. B. Monypenny R108600 is suspended from further flying. This is the first Hurricane lost and not taken off charge until 11 February 1943. On 12 May 1943, F/Sgt. Monypenny lost control of Hurricane 5383 at 1,500 ft over base, crashed and was killed.

Pilot Eric Burk Monypenny

On 31 August 1942, No. 133 Squadron has 13 officers and 199 airmen on strength, 23 Hurricane aircraft and 6 Harvard trainers. Total Hurricane flying training time for the month is 30:55 hrs day and 7:30 hrs night. 15 September 1942, Captain D. M. Howard, Chief Test Pilot, Canadian Boeing Aircraft, Co. arrives to test all of the squadron Hurricane aircraft.

23 September 1942, S/L Brooks advises the Squadron they will be moving to Boundary Bay, B. C. in October. The advance party depart by rail for Boundary Bay on 30 September 1942. At 17:00 hrs that same day, [30 Sept.] No. 135 squadron [Bulldogs] arrive for fuel with 19 Hurricane aircraft on their southern route to Sea Island, [Vancouver] B.C. The “Bulldogs” will become the first RCAF Fighter Squadron to fly from Lethbridge, Alberta, to Spokane, Washington, Yakima, Washington, and then to Sea Island, [Vancouver] B.C., No. 133 Squadron will follow this same route on 5 October 1942.

No. 133 [Falcon] Squadron patrolled the Canadian section [orange] however, unknown to many Americans, they also patrolled and were even stationed from Bellingham to Tacoma, Washington, [yellow]. This is covered in detail with Daily Diary records in chapter on pilot Gordon Hill.

Secret orders – 8 December 1942- Daily Diary

October 4th, ground personnel consisting of 135 Airmen and Officers, departed from Lethbridge at 23:59 hrs by special C.P.R. train, under supervision of flying Officer Thompson. October 5th, 16 Hurricane and 4 Harvard aircraft, under the supervision of Squadron Leader W. T. Brooks, depart from Lethbridge at 07:20 hrs via Spokane [fuel] and Yakima [fuel-image below], arriving Boundary Bay at 16:00 hrs same day.

After the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, the United States government moved quickly to organize, purchase, or lease local airports to be used as Military training airfields. In the State of Washington, 17 municipal and local civilian airports would be used as military airfields, with new expanded runways, new constructed hangars, and many other improvements. Most of these airfields had been constructed in the 1930’s depression era with funds provided by the United States Works Progress Administration and the Public Work Administration. Three of these airfields became the main Hurricane aircraft ferry route from Alberta to the West Coastal RCAF Stations which were being constructed in 1941-1942.

Felts Field, Spokane, was constructed in 1927, home to the Air National Guard/116th Observation Squadron. It was named in honor of pilot Buell Felts, killed 30 May 1927. During WWII the airfield served as a Civilian Pilots Training Program and provided the USAAF with thousands of pilots. It also became the first ferry fuel stop for RCAF aircraft [No. 135 Bulldogs and No. 133 Falcon] leaving Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada, for Sea Island and boundary Bay, B.C.

McAllister Flying School, Yakima, Washington was cleared of sagebrush in 1926 by Charles McAllister and the first building was completed in 1928, which still survives today. Above is the Yakima Air Terminal in 1940, the same sight the Hurricane pilots of No. 133 Squadron saw on 5 October 1942. This became the second important ferry flight fuel stop for RCAF aircraft, and during WWII the base was part of the Civilian Pilot Training Program.

Bellingham Army Airfield was constructed in 1936, the runway was paved in 1940, and it officially opened on 7 December 1941, the same day the Japanese struck at Pearl Harbor. On 10 December 1941, the U. S. Army moved in and constructed 38 new hangars and buildings, expanded and constructed two more runways, making a major facility for bombers and fighter aircraft. This became the main American base for the protection and defending of Puget Sound area, shared by No. 133 Squadron of the RCAF north at Boundary Bay, B. C. The Daily Operations Record for No. 133 Squadron record many flights in and out of Bellingham Army Airfield, including that of Hurricane fighter 5389.

On 5 October 1942, this Army Airfield provided an emergency stop over for the ferry flight of No. 133 Squadron 16 Hurricane fighters and 4 Harvard trainer aircraft. No RCAF ferry aircraft were required to land at Bellingham Army Airfield. On landing [Boundary Bay] Hurricane 5399, pilot F/Sgt. J. A. Leslie, makes a hard landing [the runways are still under construction] and the aircraft is damaged as Cat. “C” crash.

Two of the squadron Hurricane 5391 and 5392 were left at Lethbridge as they required new Merlin engines, which were being shipped from Fort William. October 12th, Wing Commander Gray and Flight Lt. Assheton arrived at Boundary Bay at 17:25 hrs in Hurricane 5391 and 5392.

The Squadron diary notes –

Housing condition was very poor and inadequate. The Senior NCO’s and airmen were placed in various uncomfortable sections of the station. Civilian construction personnel occupying 2 H-huts and Airmen’s Mess. One hangar is remodeled and at once lectures, physical training and organized sports are started while ground crews attempt their normal duties. The Squadron consists of 29 pilots, 27 trained for overseas duty, 17 Hurricane aircraft and 2 Harvard ready for instrument training. Due to the fact the runways are still under construction no hours of actual flight training are allowed.

The No. 133 Squadron Operations Record [below] states – NOTE –

We submit a “Nil Report” for this period, Oct. 1st to Oct. 26th, 1942, inclusive as the runways at this station are under construction.

The first Hurricane to officially take to the air at Boundary Bay, B.C. was recorded as Hurricane 5389, pilot F/O F. H. Sproule, Practice Scramble, 11:00 to 11:20 hrs, 27 October 1942 [20 minutes].

1 November 1942, strength of unit is :

RCAF Officers [Aircrew] 7,

Ground Crew Officers 2,

Airmen Aircrew 18 and Ground crew 173.

RAF Officers – 4.

Aircraft service ability

Hurricane 12,

Harvard 2.

Duties – Local flying of Sector Reconnaissance, Hurricane Scrambles, and Instrument flying in Harvard aircraft. Each month, five qualified fighter pilots will be posted overseas and replaced by five new graduates from Service Flying Training Schools in Canada.

This RCAF pilot training produced new Canadian fighter pilots for mostly England and gave coastal protection for Canadian Home War Establishment against possible Japanese attack. Only 14 flights had taken place in the month of October and now November would prove to be the break-in period for No. 133 [F] Squadron RCAF.

The total number of flights, date, and pilot name, are now listed for RCAF Hurricane [Calgary] 5389.

November 1942

Hurricane 5389 will make 17 flights in the month of November, which totals 13:25 hrs.

1 November 1942 Sgt. Millar G. G. 9:20 to 10:20 hrs Sector Reconnaissance
1 November 1942 F/Sgt. Curtis W. S. 10:35 to 11:30 hrs Sector Recon.
7 November 1942 P/O D. C. Laubman 15:40 to 16:45 hrs Formation Training
8 November 1942 F/Sgt. Tomlinson C. J 09:40 to 10:40 hrs Formation Training
8 November 1942 P/O D. C. Laubman 15:40 to 1645 hrs Formation Training
10 November 1942 F/Sgt. Walton N. R. 11:10 to 12:10 hrs Practice Scramble
13 November 1942 F/Sgt. McGowan J. G. 10:50 to 11:35 hrs Formation Flying
13 November 1942 Sgt. Costello G. A. 10:20 to 11:20 hrs Formation Flying
15 November 1942 Sgt. Monypenny E. B. 10:55 to 11:55 hrs Formation Flying
18 November 1942 P/O L. R. Brooks 15:10 to 15:40 hrs Scramble
19 November 1942 F/O F. H. Sproule 12:00 to 12:15 hrs Scramble
23 November 1942 Sgt. Young F. B. 13:25 to 13:40 hrs Scramble
24 November 1942 Sgt. Costello G. A. 11:30 to 12:20 hrs Scramble
24 November 1942 F/O R. M. Tracy 15:15 to 15:30 hrs Aircraft Test
27 November 1942 P/O L. R. Allman 16:15 to 17:05 hrs Air Test
28 November 1942 F/Sgt. Walton N. R. 09:35 to 10:35 hrs Squadron drill
28 November 1942 F/ Sgt. R. F. Gainforth 14:00 to 14:40 hrs Squadron Drill

December 1942

1 December 1942, 17 Hurricanes on strength and 5389 will make 13 flights.
1 December 1942 P/O L.R. Allman
1 December 1942 F/Sgt. McGowan J. G.
13 December 1942 P/O L. R. Allman
13 December 1942 P/O G. S. Sargent
14 December 1942 P/O G. S. Sargent
20 December 1942 F/Sgt. Shavalier R.
22 December 1942 F/Sgt. Le Gear F. S.
23 December 1942 P/O D. C. Laubman
30 December 1942 F/Sgt. Law R. R.
30 December 1942 Sgt. Dalsell D. J.
30 December 1942 F/O R. N. Gull
31 December 1942 F/O F. H. Sproule
31 December 1942 Sgt. Gaskin R. A.

January 1943

1 January 1943, 15 Hurricanes on strength and 5389 will make 11 flights.
3 January 1943 Sgt. Young F. B.
4 January 1943 F/Lt. R. W. Mc Nair [DFC] local formation flying.
7 January 1943 F/O F. H. Sproule
7 January 1943 F/O G. S. Sargent
11 January 1943 S/L W. T. Breeks
14 January 1943 P/O D. C. Laubman
27 January 1943 F/Sgt. Walton N. R.
28 January 1943 Sgt. Dalzell D. J.
29 January 1943 P/O R. M. Tracy
30 January 1943 F/Sgt. Law R.R.
31 January 1943 F/Sgt. R. F. Gainforth.

February 1943

1 February 1943, 17 Hurricanes on strength 5389 assigned 31 flights
2 February 1943 F/Sgt. W. S. Curtis
2 February 1943 Sgt. E. E. Grissom
3 February 1943 F/Sgt. H. F. Wakeman
3 February 1943 F/Sgt. R. F. Gainforth

On 4 February 1943, Pilot Officer G. S. Sargent is assigned to fly Hurricane 5398, “March of Dimes” presentation fighter, on a routine map reading night-time exercise. The aircraft never arrives at Patricia Bay, and next morning a search is conducted. The body of pilot Sargent is found.

Mayne, Saturna and North and South Pinder Islands were used by No. 133 squadron for many training flights, conducted between home base at Boundary Bay and Patricia Bay, on Vancouver Island. A number of Hurricane fighters crashed into the waters around these islands, in 1943, 1944 and 1945.

6 February 1943 F/Sgt. A. J. Ness

11 February 1943 F/O R. N. Gull
11 February 1943 F/Sgt A J. Ness
11 February 1943 F/Sgt. F. S. Le Gear
12 February 1943 F/ Sgt. F. S. Le Gear
12 February 1943 F/Sgt. F. S. Le Gear
16 February 1943 Sgt. D. J. Dalsell
19 February 1943 F/L E. H. Treleaven
19 February 1943 F/Sgt. F. S. Le Gear
20 February 1943 Sgt. F. B. Young
20 February 1943 F/O F. H. Sproule
21 February 1943 F/Sgt. W. S. Curtis
21 February 1943 P/O L. R. Allman
22 February 1943 Sgt. Gaskin R. A.
22 February 1943 Sgt. E. E. Grissom
22 February 1943 P/O L. R. Allman
23 February 1943 F/Sgt. H. F. Wakeman
23 February 1943 P/O L. R. Allman
23 February 1943 F/Sgt. F. S. Le Gear
25 February 1943 Sgt. F. B. Young
25 February 1943 Sgt. E. E. Grissom
27 February 1943 P/O L. R. Allman
27 February 1943 F/O R. M. Tracy
27 February 1943 F/Sgt J. A. Leslie
28 February 1943 P/O L. R. Allman
28 February 1943 Sgt. F. B. Young.

March 1943

1 March 1943, 17 Hurricane on strength, 5389 assigned 34 flights
2 March 1943 F/Sgt. C. J. Tomlinson
3 March 1943 F/Sgt. C. J. Tomlinson
5 March 1943 P/O L. R. Allman
5 March 1943 Sgt. E. E. Grissom
7 March 1943 F/Sgt. H. F. Wakeman
7 March 1943 F/Sgt. A. J. Ness
7 March 1943 P/O G. G. Millar
9 March 1943 F/Sgt/ R. A. Gaskin
10 March 1943 F/Sgt. W. S. Curtis
10 March 1943 P/O L. R. Allman
11 March 1943 F/Sgt. J. A. Leslie
11 March 1943 F/Sgt. F. S. Le Gear
13 March 1943 F/Sgt. R. Shavalier
15 March 1943 P/O D. C. Laubman
16 March 1943 F/Sgt. W.S. Curtis
16 March 1943 F/Sgt. J. A. Leslie
17 March 1943 F/Sgt. F. S. Le Gear
17 March 1943 F/Sgt. F. S. Le Gear
17 March 1943 F/Sgt. F. S. Le Gear
19 March 1943 F/Sgt. C. J. Tomlinson
19 March 1943 F/Sgt. C. J. Tomlinson
20 March 1943 F/Sgt. G. A. Costello
20 March 1943 F/Sgt. G. A. Costello
25 March 1943 F/Sgt. C. J. Tomlinson
25 March 1943 F/Sgt. C. J. Tomlinson
25 March 1943 F/Sgt. C. J. Tomlinson
25 March 1943 F/Sgt. C. J. Tomlinson
25 March 1943 F/Sgt. C. J. Tomlinson
26 March 1943 P/O G. G. Millar
28 March 1943 F/Sgt. J. A. Leslie
28 March 1943 F/Sgt. F. B. Young
29 March 1943 F/Sgt. N. R. Walton
29 March 1943 F/Sgt. W.S. Curtis
29 March 1943 F/Sgt. E. B. Monypenny

April 1943

1 April 1943, 16 Hurricanes on strength, 5389 assigned 35 flights
1 April 1943 F/Sgt. W. S. Curtis
2 April 1943 Sgt. E. E. Grissom
2 April 1943 F/Sgt. C. J. Tomlinson
3 April 1943 F/Sgt. H. F. Wakeman
4 April 1943 Sgt. E. E. Grissom
4 April 1943 F/Sgt. C. J. Tomlinson
4 April 1943 Sgt. E. E. Grissom
5 April 1943 F/O F. H. Sproule
5 April 1943 Sgt. E. E. Allman
6 April 1943 P/O L. R. Allman
8 April 1943 F/O F. H. Sproule
9 April 1943 F/Sgt. C. J. Tomlinson
10 April 1943 F/Sgt. R. F. Gainforth
11 April 1943 F/Sgt. G. A. Costello
11 April 1943 F/O F. H. Sproule
12 April 1943 F/O F. H. Sproule
13 April 1943 F/O J. M. Ingalls
13 April 1943 F/O J. M. Ingalls
14 April 1943 F/Sgt. F. B. Young
14 April 1943 F/Sgt. F. B. Young
15 April 1943 F/Sgt. E. B. Monypenny
15 April 1943 F/Sgt. J. A. Leslie
15 April 1943 F/O F. H. Sproule
18 April 1943 P/O J. G. McGowan
18 April 1943 F/Sgt. H. F. Wakeman
18 April 1943 F/O J. M. Ingalls
18 April 1943 F/Sgt. F. B. Young
18 April 1943 F/O F. H. Sproule
19 April 1943 F/O J. M. Ingalls
19 April 1943 F/Sgt. F. B. Young
19 April 1943 F/O R. W. Ferguson
19 April 1943 F/Sgt. F. S. Le Gear
21 April 1943 F/Sgt. E. B. Monypenny
28 April 1943 F/O D. C. Laubman
29 April 1943 F/Sgt. W. S. Curtis.

May 1943

1 May 1943, 6 Officers and 17 Airmen, 19 Hurricanes on strength, 5389 assigned 49 flights.
2 May 1943 F/O R. M. Tracy
2 May 1943 F/Lt. J. B. McCall
2 May 1943 F/O R. M. Tracy
2 May 1943 F/O L. R. Allman
3 May 1943 F/O D. C. Laubman
5 May 1943 F/Sgt. R. F. Gainforth
5 May 1943 F/Sgt. G. J. Tomlinson
6 May 1943 P/O R.R. Law
6 May 1943 P/O R. R. Law
6 May 1943 F/O F. H. Sproule
7 May 1943 F/O R. W. Ferguson
8 May 1943 Sgt. D. J. Dalsell
8 May 1943 F/Sgt. F. S. le Gear
8 May 1943 F/Sgt. F. S. Le Gear
9 May 1943 P/O J. G. McGowan
9 May 1943 F/O R. M. Tracy
9 May 1943 F/Lt. J. B. McCall
9 May 1943 P/O J. G. McGowan
9 May 1943 F/Sgt. R. A. Gaskin
10 May 1943 Sgt. D. J. Dalsell
10 May 1943 F/Lt. J. B. Deek

On 11 May 1943, two new pilots reported to No. 133 squadron, P/O T. W. Wann and Sgt. Gordon M. Hill. The next day, 12 May, F/Sgt. Monypenny was killed flying Hurricane 5383.

Source Facebook page Boundary Bay 1941-1945 

14 May 1943 F/Sgt. R. Shavalier
14 May 1943 F/Sgt. L. R. Allman

15 May 1943 Sgt. Gordon M. Hill [R14282] first flight in Hurricane 5389.

Gordon M. Hill Course #65, continued his pilot training in fall of 1942, No. 13 S. F. T. S. St. Hubert, Quebec. He graduated and received his “Wings” on 22 January 1943, posted to No. 1 Operational Training Unit at Bagotville, Quebec, training Hurricane pilots. Course #8 began on 30 January 1943 and 29 pupils graduated as Hurricane pilots on 23 April 1943. Two pilots were posted to Eastern Air Command of Home War Establishment, while P/O Wann and Sgt. Hill were posted to Western Air Command, No. 133 Squadron at Boundary Bay. B.C.

Graduation photo – 22 January 1943

The full RCAF career of pilot F/O Gordon Hill will be covered in two complete chapters, with over 400 unpublished photos, and new art work.

15 May 1943 F/O F. H. Sproule
16 May 1943 F/Sgt. W. S. Curtis
17 May 1943 F/Sgt. R. Shavalier
18 May 1943 P/O T. W. Wann
18 May 1943 P/O T. W. Wann
18 May 1943 F/O R. M. Tracy
19 May 1943 F/O R. M. Tracy
20 May 1943 P/O R. R. Law
20 May 1943 P/O R. R. Law
20 May 1943 F/O R. M. Tracy
20 May 1943 F/O R. M. Tracy
23 May 1943 F/Sgt. H. F. Wakeman
23 May 1943 Sgt. G. M. Hill
23 May 1943 F/Sgt. H. F. Wakeman
24 May 1943 F/O L. R. Allman
24 May 1943 F/O L. R. Allman
25 May 1943 F/Sgt. W. S. Curtis
25 May 1943 P/O J. M. Ingalls
25 May 1943 F/Sgt. F. S. Le Gear
26 May 1943 F/Sgt. C. J. Tomlinson
26 May 1943 F/Sgt. R. Shavalier
28 May 1943 P/O T. W. Wann
31 May 1943 Sgt. G. M. Hill
31 May 1943 P/O R. R. Law
31 May 1943 F/O F. H. Sproule

June 1943

1 June 1943, 15 Hurricane on strength, 5389 assigned 47 flights.
1 June 1943 Sgt. G. M. Hill
1 June 1943 F/L J. B. McCall
1 June 1943 F/L J. B. McCall
1 June 1943 F/Sgt. F. S. Le Gear
2 June 1943 F/L J. B. McCall
3 June 1943 F/O F. H. Sproule
4 June 1943 F/Sgt. H. F. Wakeman
4 June 1943 F/Sgt. H. F. Wakeman
5 June 1943 F/Sgt. H. F. Wakeman
5 June 1943 F/Sgt. N.F. Wakeman
5 June 1943 F/Sgt. R. A. Gaskin
6 June 1943 F/Sgt. R. A. Gaskin
6 June 1943 WO2 W. S. Curtis
6 June 1943 Sgt. G. M. Hill [13:00) to 14:00 hrs – submarine search]
6 June 1943 Sgt. D. J. Dalsell
7 June 1943 F/L J. B. McCall
7 June 1943 F/Sgt. R. A. Gaskin
7 June 1943 Sgt. D. J. Dalsell
7 June 1943 F/Sgt. J. A. Leslie
7 June 1943 W02 W.S. Curtis
7 June 1943 W02 W. S. Curtis
8 June 1943 W02 W. S. Curtis
8 June 1943 W02 W. S. Curtis
9 June 1943 P/O R. R. Law
9 June 1943 W02 W. S. Curtis
9 June 1943 F/Sgt. R. A. Gaskin
10 June 1943 F/O R. M. Tracy
11 June 1943 W02 A. J. Ness
12 June 1943 W02 A. J. Ness
13 June 1943 W02 R. F. Gainforth
13 June 1943 F/Sgt. R. A. Gaskin
13 June 1943 W02 R. F. Gainforth
13 June 1943 W02 R. F. Gainforth
17 June 1943 W02 F. S. LeGear
18 June 1943 F/O T. W. Wann
18 June 1943 F/Sgt. R. A. Gaskin
19 June 1943 F/O L. R. Allman
21 June 1943 Sgt. D. J. Dalsell
22 June 1943 Sgt. D. J. Dalsell
22 June 1943 F/O R. M. Tracy
22 June 1943 F/O R. M. Tracy
23 June 1943 F/Sgt. R. A. Gaskin
23 June 1943 F/L J. B. McCall
23 June 1943 F/O L. R. Allman
24 June 1943 W02 R. W. Ferguson
27 June 1943 W02 A. J. Ness
28 June 1943 F/L J. B. McCall

The last scramble at Boundry Bay, B.C. is recorded on 30 June 1943, 08:00 to 08:50 hrs when two Hurricane aircraft 5395 and 5397 complete a sea patrol. The squadron now prepare for the movement to Tofino, B.C.

Fourteen Hurricane Mk. XII fighter aircraft and two Harvard Mk. IIB aircraft fly to the new base at Tofino, B. C. Hurricane 5389 is piloted by F/O R. W. Ferguson and his flight time is 15:45 to 17:00 hrs.

July 1943

The squadron begin operations on 5 July and Hurricane 5389 will make 19 flights in the month of July 1943.

5 July 1943 W02 A. J. Ness
5 July 1943 F/O J. M. Ingalls
6 July 1943 P/O J. G. McGowan
6 July 1943 W02 J. A. Leslie
9 July 1943 W02 W.S. Curtis
9 July 1943 W02 W. S. Curtis
9 July 1943 Sgt. G. M. Hill Formation Attack – 14:10 to 15:00 hrs.
10 July 1943 F/O V. J. Le Gear
11 July 1943 F/Sgt. J. V. Burke
11 July 1943 W02 J. A. Leslie
11 July 1943 F/O T. W. Wann
12 July 1943 W02 J. A. Leslie
12 July 1943 W02 J. A. Leslie
12 July 1943 W02 J. A. Leslie
12 July 1943 W/C C. N. Greenway
13 July 1943 F/Sgt. J. V. Burke
13 July 1943 F/Sgt. R. A. Gaskin
14 July 1943 P/O R. H. Brown
14 July 1943 P/O F. D. Hague 15:05 to 16:15 hrs., – “Crashed” Cat. “B”.

On 22 July 1943, Hurricane 5389 is loaded onto a ship and transported to No. 13 Aeronautical Inspection District, Vancouver, B. C. [Coates Ltd.] for repairs. Hurricane 5389 remained at No. 13 A.I.D. until 15 March 1944.

In the fall of 1938, the RCAF decided to create repair units close to major aircraft companies in Canada. This allowed technically experienced civilian personnel to assist aircraft contractors and report back to the RCAF Headquarters on how repair work was being carried out as well as inspections on the quality of repair work. These new units were designated as RCAF Technical Detachments and given numbers. No. 11 T.D. – Montreal, Quebec, No. 12 T.D. – Toronto, Ontario, No. 13 T.D. – Vancouver, B. C., No. 14 T. D. – Ottawa, Ontario, No. 15 T. D. – Winnipeg, Manitoba, No. 16 T. D. – Edmonton, Alberta, and No. 17 T. D. at Halifax, Nova Scotia. In 1940, these units were re-designated as RCAF Aeronautical Inspection Districts and formerly No. 13 Technical Detachment became No. 13 A.I.D. at Vancouver, B.C. also called “Coates Ltd” for the civilian company. In July 1943, a significant number of RCAF aircraft required repair work and to assist this high demand a priority system was established. The Canadian built Hurricane fighters were no longer a front line aircraft and they took a backseat to repair of other important aircraft. Hurricane 5389 would remain [parked] under repair when time permitted, at No. 13 A.I.D. Vancouver, B. C. for the next eight months.

No. 133 [Falcon] Fighter Squadron continued to fly Hurricane aircraft on West Coast air defence from Tofino, B. C., until 9 March 1944, when they were transferred to Sea Island, [Vancouver] B.C. This became part of what many historians call the “RCAF musical chairs” when complete squadrons moved from base to base and switched aircraft from squadron to squadron.

This has caused many problems for Internet historians and fogged over the true history of Hurricane 5389. Fortunately, the wartime Daily Diaries of both No. 133 and 135 squadrons are very detailed and contain a wealth of information on what in fact took place.

On 10 March 1944, [above record Daily Diary] No. 133 Squadron ferried 17 of their original Hurricane Mk. XII fighters from Tofino, to Patricia Bay, and then to Sea Island, [Vancouver, B.C. F/O Gordon Hill flew Hurricane 5378 to Sea Island, Vancouver, B. C. These Hurricanes are now parked [Vancouver] and No. 133 Squadron will receive 18 Kittyhawk fighters, Mk. I, [11] Mk. IA, [2] and Mk. III [5] aircraft transferred from No. 163 Squadron, which will be disbanded at Patricia Bay, B. C. on 15 March 1944.

To add to this confusion, we have 16 ex-135 Hurricane fighters parked at Terrace, B.C.
No. 135 [Bulldog] Squadron began to ferry their 16 Hurricane fighters [plus two Harvard trainers] from Annette Island, Alaska, [U. S. Command] to Terrace, B.C. on 17 November 1943. They flew patrols from Terrace until 29 February 1944 when they stood down until 11 March 1944, pending a move to Patricia Bay, B.C. They left their original Hurricane aircraft at Terrace, B.C. and the pilots were ferried to Patricia Bay. B. C. on 12 March 1944. No. 170 [Ferry] Squadron began moving the 16 Hurricanes fighters to Patricia Bay on 31 March 1944. The last #5579 arrived at Patricia Bay, B.C. 31 January 1945.

The No. 135 Squadron Daily Diary for 12 March 1944 records – “Arrived Vancouver, Sunday Morning at 10:00 hrs. The party split at C.N.R. Depot and 18 pilots led by S/L Smith [Sqdn. O. C.] proceeding to Sea Island to ferry Hurricane aircraft which formerly operated by No. 133 [F] Squadron. Upon arrival at Sea Island it was discovered only 15 Hurricanes were available, and three Harvard. The party under S/L Smith, piloted the Hurricanes over to Patricia Bay and arrived at 12:00 hrs.

These 15 original No. 133 Squadron Hurricane aircraft are now transferred to No. 135 [Bulldog] Squadron and flown from Sea Island, [Vancouver] to Patricia Bay. B. C. on 12 March 1944. Hurricane 5394 [original No. 133 Sqn. fighter] and 5413 [original No. 135 Sqn. fighter] were not serviceable and after repairs, will join No. 135 Squadron at Patricia Bay on 22 April 1944.

Thanks to this confusion of RCAF Hurricane fighters being switched [musical chairs] from No. 133 Squadron to No. 135 Squadron, the location of Hurricane 5389 has been lost by many historians. The Daily Diary of No. 13 Aeronautical Inspection [Coates Ltd. Vancouver] contains the facts on [Calgary] Hurricane 5389.

On 15 March 1944, No. 13 Aeronautical Inspection District, [Coates Ltd. Vancouver] notify No. 133 Squadron that Hurricane 5389 has been repaired and is ready for return to their squadron. P/O R. A. Gaskin [No. 133 Sqn.] picks up Hurricane 5389 at 10:10 hrs and flies it to No. 135 Squadron in Patricia Bay, arriving at 10:40 hrs. Hurricane 5389 will become the 17th ex-No. 133 Squadron fighter aircraft to be transferred to No. 135 [Bulldog] Squadron and for the second time in her career, 5389 will now fly with the ‘Bulldogs’ stationed at Patricia Bay, B. C.

Remember, Hurricane 5389 began her RCAF career training No. 135 pilots at Mossbank, Saskatchewan, from 8-26 July 1942, and now she will end her career with No. 135 [Bulldog] Squadron at Patricia Bay, B.C.

No. 133 Squadron will fly the Curtiss Kittyhawk from mid-March 1944 to July 1945.

The No. 135 Daily Diary reports on 10 May 1944 all pilots have soloed on the new Kittyhawk fighters, with the exception of two pilots on leave. The old ex-No. 133 Squadron Hurricane fighters are only flown for airframe and engine tests, preparing them for upcoming ferry flights.
Hurricane 5389 is last flown in No. 135 Squadron on 22 May 1944, pilot P/O Hodgins B. H., 15:15 to 16:15 hrs airframe and engine testing.

The next chapter in Hurricane 5389 is about to begin, and this involves the ferrying of thousands of war surplus aircraft across Canada.

In early December 1943, the Ottawa Supervisory Board began discussing the need to expand the BCATP in Canada, beyond the 31 March 1945 termination date which had been agreed upon in 1942. In early February 1944, Harold Balfour, British Under Secretary of State for Air and Air Marshal Sir Peter Drummond, RAF Air Member for Training arrived in Ottawa for meetings with Canadian Air Minister C. G. Power. On 16 February, Power officially explained to the Canadian House of Commons the need for a cutback in BCATP aircrew training. The reduction would be forty per cent and this involved the closing of 33 aircrew training schools out of a total of eight-two currently in operation.

At the request of the British government, Canada had agreed to close the 26 RAF schools first, and this began on 14 January 1944, when No. 33 [RAF] Elementary Flying Training School at Caron, Saskatchewan was closed. No. 41 [RAF] Service Flying Training School, Weyburn, Sask., was closed on 22 January 44, followed by No. 35 [RAF] S.F.T.S. North Battleford, Sask., on 25 February 1944, then No. 37 S.F.T.S. [RAF H.Q.] at Calgary, Alberta, 10 March 1944, and so on.
By the end of November 1944, all but two British RAF Schools in Canada had closed, including 13 schools located in No. 4 and No. 2 Air Training Commands in Western Canada. With the closing of these BCATP airfields, the Canadian Government began to plan for the end of hostilities and the future plans for these abandoned military airfields.

The first priority became the huge storage of surplus military equipment, including thousands of unwanted vehicles, supplies, and ex-wartime aircraft. To move this vast amount of military aircraft to the new storage holding units a new ferry squadron of RCAF pilots was required. On 1 March 1944, No. 170 [Ferry] Squadron was formed at Winnipeg, Manitoba, using RCAF personnel from the Western Detachment of No. 124 [Ferry] Squadron. This new squadron was assigned the task of ferrying over 5,000 training and operational aircraft in Western Canada, including the old Hurricane fighters used by No. 163, No. 135, and No. 133 Squadrons in the air defense of the West Coast.

On 26 May 1944, No. 170 [Ferry] Squadron pilots arrived at No. 135 [Bulldog] Squadron Patricia Bay, and ferry out the first two Hurricane aircraft, 5379 and 5425. Hurricane 5379 was an original No. 133 Squadron Hurricane fighter [16 June 1942] and 5425 was an original No. 135 Squadron fighter [18 June 1942]. Hurricane 5425 was ferried from Terrace, B. C. to Patricia Bay, B. C. on 3 October 1944.

On 27 May 44, No. 170 ferry pilots arrive at No. 135 Squadron and ferry out 5394 and 5413. Again, Hurricane 5394 is an original No. 133 Sqn. fighter [30 June 1942] and 5413 is an original No. 135 Sqn. fighter [23 July 1942]. Hurricane 5413 was ferried from Terrace, B. C. to Patricia Bay, on 31 March 1944.

On 1 June 1944, No. 135 [Bulldog] Squadron have 13 Hurricane fighters on strength but not in use. These 13 fighters are all ex-No. 133 Squadron aircraft which now includes [Calgary] Hurricane 5389. On 21 June 44, No. 170 [Ferry] squadron pilots begin the movement of Hurricanes from Patricia Bay, B. C. to Yakima and Spokane, Washington, USA, to Lethbridge detachment in southern Alberta. The last flight of a Hurricane by No. 135 Squadron took place at Patricia Bay on 25 June 1944, W02 Connor J. W. flew Hurricane 5377 from 16:30 to 17:00 hrs on engine test. This became the last Hurricane to leave No. 135 Squadron for Lethbridge that same date. The exact date that Hurricane 5389 was ferried to Lethbridge, Alberta, was never recorded in the Daily Diary of No. 135 Squadron or by No. 170 [Ferry] squadron, who only recorded the number of aircraft ferried on each date. On 24 June 44, No. 170 Sqn. ferried six Hurricanes from Patricia Bay, B. C. to Lethbridge Detachment, Alberta, and I believe that was the date Hurricane 5389 arrived at Lethbridge, Alberta. It appears the Hurricane fighters remained at Lethbridge for at least five months. No. 32 SFTS [RAF] Moose Jaw, Sask., closed on 17 October 1944, and No. 4 Training Command ceased to exist on 1 December 1944, replaced by No. 2 Air Command.

On 2 December 1944, the old RAF base became No. 2 Reserve Equipment Maintenance Unit, RCAF, Moose Jaw, Sask. The first “Forty-Two” storage aircraft arrived on 5 December 1944, and were placed into hangars. The very last RAF personnel are repatriated back to the United Kingdom on 2 January 1945. In the next few weeks No. 170 [Ferry] Squadron pilots will fly eleven Hurricane fighters for “Reserve Storage” at Moose Jaw, Sask.

One of them is 5389, today Calgary Flight Hangar Museum.

On 1 July 1944, the Canadian Government began to plan and create Surplus Equipment Holding Units at the abandoned WWII British Commonwealth Air Training Plan bases across Canada. No. 170 [Ferry] squadron which had been formed on 1 March 1944, were now responsible for the ferrying of all surplus RCAF aircraft to these vacant training bases. The RCAF had on strength 12,000 surplus aircraft, and many, like the Avro Ansons, were just set on fire and destroyed. Others, including the Hurricanes Mk. XIIs, were flown to an “Aircraft Holding Unit” where they were stored and maintained in flying condition, and could be flown out on short notice.
On 1 December 1944, a total reorganization and re-naming of the storage units took place. The name was changed to “RESERVE EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE UNITS” with a Headquarters and reserve satellite units located in the old training bases. On this date No. 4 and No. 2 [WWII] Training Commands ceased to exist and were replaced by No. 2 Air Command. On record cards, it appears that aircraft were moved, however only the Air Force Command names were changed.

No. 1 Reserve Equipment Maintenance Unit was established at Lethbridge, Alberta, on 15 December 1944, ex-No. 8 Bombing and Gunnery School. Under its command were three Satellite Units, No. 101 at Macleod, Alberta, No. 102 at Pearce, Alberta, and No. 103 at Vulcan, Alberta.

No. 2 Reserve E. M. U. was located at Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, on 2 December 1944, [Ex-RAF 32 SFTS] and under it were formed four Reserve Equipment Maintenance Satellite Units. No. 201 at Dafoe, Sask., No. 202 at Mossbank, Sask., No. 203 at Caron, Sask., No. 204 at Assiniboia, Sask., and No. 205 at Davidson, Saskatchewan.

At least eleven Hurricane fighters were held in storage at units under command of No. 2 Reserved Equipment Maintenance Unit, Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan. Their serial numbers appear in the Daily Diary of various units, when they were flown during some special event. They were just a group of old WWII fighters, which were outdated, ready for scrapping and of no further use to the Air Force. That all changed in early November 1944, and saved them from being scrapped. The confirmed Hurricane serial numbers are – 5377, 5389 [Calgary], 5393, 5418 [Wetaskiwin], 5414, 5424 [fake serial in England], 5447, 5584 [Ottawa], and 5588. The two unidentified Hurricane fighters are possibly – 5395 and 5478.

Beginning on 3 November 1944, and continuing until late June 1945, Japan launched between 9,000 and 10,000 incendiary balloons from their home islands. This history can be found on many websites and in numerous publications, which does not need to be repeated. The first line of defence for the RCAF became the West Coast of Canada, and this involved de Havilland F.B. Mk. 26 Mosquito fighters flown by No. 133 Squadron. The RCAF Mosquito aircraft were the only West Coast fighters to attain the speed and altitude to possibly intercept the Japanese balloons, travelling at 125 m.p.h. at over 35,000 feet.

In January 1945, a ‘secret’ second line of defence was being established by the RCAF and this involved old Hurricanes based in the Prairies, to track and possibly shoot-down the Fu-go weapons. In February 1945, Air Commodore B. F. Johnson, No. 2 Air Command, [Winnipeg] ordered a number of Hawker Hurricane fighters be removed from reserve storage at [No. 2 R.E.M.U.] Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, flown to No. 8 Repair Depot, Winnipeg, and made ready for flying Fu-go [Japanese Fire-Balloon] interception duties. Historians record the number of Hurricane fighters at five, however my research indicates six or possibly seven Hurricane aircraft were involved in these patrols for balloons. The proof is there, in Ottawa, if you take time to research it, page by page.

These Hurricane fighter serial numbers first appear recorded in the Daily Diary for No. 8 Repair Depot, Winnipeg, Manitoba, dated 2 February 1945. Hurricane 5418 arrives for a new Merlin 29 engine, from No. 2 Reserve Equipment Maintenance Unit, Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan. The fighter is stored in hangar #4, awaiting a new engine and other parts. A Merlin 29-233 engine is installed, and completed on 17 February 1945, the fighter is returned to storage at No. 2 R.E.H.U, by a pilot from 170 [Ferry] Squadron.

This rare fighter survives today in the world class aviation museum at Wetaskiwin, Alberta, today run by Alberta Culture and Community Spirit Heritage, with Byron Reynolds, AME, Honorary Curator of the Aviation Program.

Movement of Airframe and Aero Engines for month of February 1944, No. 8 Repair Depot, Winnipeg, Manitoba.

Hurricane 5418 is one of the first five fighters selected for duty in Saskatchewan. It is flown to No. 8 Repair Depot for minor engine repairs on 2 February 1945, and requires a new Merlin engine, which is installed by 17 February 1945. This Merlin 29 remains in the fighter today.
In 1986, I met Bryon Reynolds, at the then titled “Reynolds Museum Ltd” Wetaskiwin, Alberta. In 1998, I was invited, and gave two lectures on my subject of WWII aircraft nose art. On 27 December 2000, I received a phone call from Bryon, and he ask if I would paint the replica No. 135 “Bulldog” on the nose of Hurricane 5418. He knew my answer, but made it very clear, the nose art must be as close to the original as possible, and that including counting the aircraft rivets. Working with Byron was very professional and followed the same standard as that in the Smithsonian, Washington, D.C., USA.

This was the original pattern ‘nose art’ Bulldog approved by Bryon Reynolds. I spent six hours with Bryon and obtained as much history on Hurricane 5418 as I could. I was in for a big surprise, involving a rare part of unknown RCAF “Fu-go” nose art. This complete new history, with paintings, will appear next year [2018] on my Blog. Here is a small part of that story.

The Reynolds-Alberta Museum Hurricane 5418, ex-No. 135 [Bulldog] Squadron, was obtained by Stan Reynolds from a Saskatchewan farmer in November 1960.

Byron Reynolds – March 2001

When Hurricane 5418 arrived at No. 4 S.F.T.S. at Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, on 15 June 1945, it still contained the original image of the 135 Bulldog nose art. This was over-painted and a new nose art image appeared over the section where the Bulldog had been painted. This “Beautifull Balloon” nose art was still on the Hurricane engine cowling when it arrived at Wetaskiwin in November 1960. Bryon Reynolds copied the image and my replica painting is being shown for the first time.

The only WWII RCAF “Fu-go” nose art in the world. [Complete history coming in 2018]

Yes, that is the correct spelling for Hurricane 5418 nose art, painted in June 1945.

On 22 February 1945, Hurricane 5588 arrives at No. 8 Repair Depot for modification. This is completed on 9 April, and No. 170 [Ferry] squadron fly 5588 to No. 23 E.F.T.S. at Yorkton, Saskatchewan. The Daily Diary records one Hurricane taken on charge, no pilot name, no report of balloon sightings, and no scramble of the fighter. It appears there was total censorship by the C.O. at Yorkton, Sask.

On 12 March 1945, Hurricane, 5377, 5584, [Ottawa] and 5389 [Calgary] are flown in by No. 170 [Ferry] Sqdn. pilots for modification. When these three aircraft were placed into “Reserve Storage” [No. 2 R.E.M.U.] Moose Jaw, Sask., the radio, all armour plating, and the twelve .303 Cal. Browning machine guns were removed. The modification at Winnipeg involved replacing the radio and one .303 machine gun, for shooting at the Japanese balloons. Hurricane 5389, [Calgary] is completed on 14 March 1945, and flown to No. 23 EFTS at Yorkton, Saskatchewan, joining Hurricane 5588.

On 17 March 1945, Hurricane 5393 arrives for modification [below] and leaves the same date, flown by 170 [Ferry] Squadron to No. 4 SFTS at Saskatoon, Sask.

Hurricane 5393 completes patrols with no balloon sightings, or records appearing, until 8 June 1945, at 21:55 hrs.

Hurricane 5584 arrives at Winnipeg on 12 March 1945, and departs (No. 170 [Ferry] Sqn.) 19 March 1945, for No. 32 SFTS at Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan. [seen with records of Hurricane 5393, 17 March 1945] Hurricane 5377, which arrived with 5584 [Ottawa] and 5389 [Calgary] was never modified or assigned to any RCAF Station. It was prepared for being inhibited, 30 May 1945, and returned to No 3 S.E.H.U at Swift Current, Sask.

5377 remained at Swift Current, Sask., where it was sold on 13 July 1946.

Hurricane 5418 arrived at No. 8 Repair Depot on 7 May 1945, for modification of radio and machine gun.

Hurricane 5418, was taken on charge at No. 4 S.F.T.S at Saskatoon, Sask. 15 June 1945 and joins 5393 in patrols. Its first action is recorded on 21 June 1945, over Climax, Sask.

Thanks to these No. 8 Repair Depot records and base RCAF Daily Diary reports, the number and location of the RCAF Hurricane “Fu-go” fighters can be confirmed. There were five original Hurricanes, which No. 2 Air Command stationed at Saskatoon, [two] Yorkton, [two] and Moose Jaw, [one] Saskatchewan, beginning on 14 March 1945 and then removed, one by one, ending on 12 July 1945.

The Government assigned the Canadian Army as the chief agency to find, and most of all transport bomb disposal experts to the crash site. This same operation is going on today, as these 1944-1945 fire balloon bombs are still being discovered, the latest at Lumby, B.C., in October 2014.

The five RCAF Hurricane fighters were given the task of shooting down the balloons, then the RCAF would transport Army experts to the site, and last, the recovered material was flown by RCAF transport to Ottawa. The Canadian Government feared the balloons were transporting biological weapons of war, and total censorship was applied. This lack of records and no newspaper reporting has affected the true research and history to present day. The use of old RCAF Daily Diary for the period has released many hidden facts.

The peak Japanese balloon-launching months were February, March, and April 1945. Only four RCAF Hurricane fighters were on patrol during these three months. #5389 on 14 March 1945, #5393 on 17 March 1945, #5584 on 19 March 1945, and #5588 on 10 April 1945. Hurricane 5418 arrived on 15 June, near the end of the patrol period. A sixth [and last] Hurricane #5447, arrived at Yorkton, Sask., on 6 June 1945, but never taken on strength, [two Hurricanes appear in Daily Diary for end of June, 5588-5389] after twenty days, 5447 was flown to No. 3 S.E.H.U. at Swift Current, Saskatchewan, 26-27 June, and inhibited by 1 October 1945. Hurricane 5447, never appears in the Daily Diary and only two Hurricanes are ever shown taken on strength at Yorkton, Sask., for the month of June 1945. I believe 5447 was assigned to Moose Jaw, then during delivery the patrols were cancelled, and 5447 ended up at Yorkton, for twenty days and one photo was taken. [Photo on Vintage Wings site]

Hurricane 5447 was being ferried by P/O Ramsay of No. 124 [Ferry] Squadron, Rockcliffe, Ontario, on 4 September 1942. It had a category “A” crash one-half mile north-west of Porquis Junction, Ontario. It was salvaged and transported back to Fort William for a completed rebuild. Taken on strength RCAF No. 1 Training Command, it served with Home War Establishment at Nova Scotia from 2 October 1942 to 5 July 1943. It was sent to No. 3 Training Command for repairs and placed into storage 29 November 1944. On 4 June 1945, it was taken out of storage and flown to No. 2 Air Command at Yorkton, Saskatchewan.

There are no records of modification for Hurricane 5447 at No. 8 Repair Depot, Winnipeg, and it appears no machine gun was ever installed. No. 8 R.D. had a fleet of mobile panel trucks with mechanics who drove to RCAF Stations for minor aircraft repairs. On 24 June 1945, Winnipeg, No. 8 R.D. mobile party [five workers] did a special inspection [M.5] on Hurricane 5389 and 5447 at No. 23 E.F.T.S., Yorkton, Sask. This proves the Hurricane was at the station, but never shows up in any other records. I believe this was to prepare the two fighters for storage [inhibited], and they were next flown to No. 3 Surplus Equipment Holding Unit at Swift Current, Saskatchewan, between 12 and 18 July. No. 5447 was recorded ready for disposal on 12 July 1945, inhibited in October, with 312:40 hrs airframe flying time. Sold on 28 August 1946.

On 28 August 1946, #5447 was sold to a Regina farmer and years later re-sold to Harry Whereatt of Assiniboia, Sask. in 1988. The aircraft came with nose art name “Star Dust” and large yellow 71 painted on the original engine cowling. It was slowly being restored to flying condition by Harry until he became ill [stroke] and sold it to Vintage Wings of Canada, 23 August 2006. It is still under restoration at V.W. in Ottawa, and will appear as the famous fighter of Calgary’s Willie McKnight. Vintage Wings have many highly qualified research experts, and I’m sure the full history of #5447 will appear on their website. I am interested to see if my amateur research is at all close.

Swift Current, Saskatchewan

No. 39 Service Flying Training School. Swift Current, Saskatchewan, was a British R.A.F. school, one of 26 that operated in Canada during WWII. The last class of trainees, Course #63, began on 29 November 1943 and 55 graduated on 24 March 1944. That is the same date the British school was disbanded. On 1 April 44, a new school re-opened by the RCAF as No. 402 Aircraft Holding Unit. It was unique in RCAF history, as it was never fully established when it was disbanded at 23:59 hrs, 21 May 1944. It had a staff of six officers, 51 airmen and 42 civilians, plus temporary personnel of 103. It was formed to store and maintain RCAF surplus aircraft in flying condition, then the RCAF senior command began to restructure aircraft holding units, and it became RCAF Station, Swift Current, Saskatchewan.

On 1 May 1945, RCAF Swift Current re-opened as No. 3 Surplus Equipment Holding Unit, Swift Current. By the end of the month they had 432 aircraft in storage, including two Hurricane Mk. XII fighters. The Daily Diary for May 1945, contains only one Hurricane serial number, #5414 which had been on a Victory Loan Drive from 11 April 1945. This is an ex-135 [Bulldog] fighter which records her tire being repaired on 4 August 1945, at No. 3 S.E.H.U. 5414 was inhibited in October 1945, and sold on 20 August 1946.

From early June to 18 July 1945, eight Hurricane fighters arrive for storage and the following day [19] one more Hurricane arrives. That brings the total to 11 Hurricanes on strength. This is recorded in the Daily Diary for 31 July 1945, and they also have 205 Avro Anson trainers in storage. A good number of these will be set on fire and destroyed.

Five of these Hurricane Mk. XII fighters were ex- “Fu-go” Japanese Balloon fighters, which were taken on charge at Yorkton, Moose Jaw, and Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. The following history was found in a number of RCAF Daily Diary records, giving a much clearer picture of what took place in after June 1945.
1. #5389 [ex-133 Sqn.] returned 26 June 1945, Inhibited 15 November 1945. Sold 20 August 1946.
2. #5393 [ex-133 Sqn.] returned 18 July 1945. Sold 20 August 1946.
3. #5418 [ex-135 Sqn.] returned 18 July 1945, flown to Air show at Winnipeg, 4 August, and returned 22 August 1945. Inhibited in October 1945. Sold 20 August 1946.
4. #5447 (No. 170 [Ferry] Sqn.) arrived 26-27 June 1945. Inhibited in October. Sold 28 August 1946.
5. #5584 [ex-163- 135] [at the Canadian Aviation and Space Museum, in Ottawa, today] arrived 22 August 1945, picked up by F/O Saidler, 13 June 1946, flew in Winnipeg airshow 12-13th July and then Edmonton 26 July 46. F/L Anderson was the Edmonton pilot, then the Hurricane had engine problems and could not fly. 28 July 1946, flown to Winnipeg. Never sold, saved for display and today in Ottawa, still owned by Canadian Government. Flown only 196:55 hrs.

6. #5588 [ex-163 Sqn.] arrived early June 1945. Picked up by F/O Dibnah R.H. at Swift Current, on 13 June 1946, and flown in Airshow at Winnipeg, by F/O Saidler D. 12-13 July 46. Flown in Edmonton Airshow by F/L Anderson on 26 July 65. Suffered a flat tire at Suffield, Alberta, 28 July 46. Inhibited at unknown location, and not sold until 22 October 1953.

The mystery Hurricane #5424. [Possibly flew in Manitoba]

This Hurricane 5424, was an original No. 135 [Bulldog] Squadron fighter which was stored at No. 18 Staging Unit, Terrace, B.C. on 12 March 1944. The ferrying of 15 Bulldog stored Hurricanes from Terrace to Patricia Bay, B.C. began on 31 March 44, when No. 170 [Ferry] squadron pilots departed with #5413 and #5414. They completed a second record flight for the RCAF, when they returned using the little known “Internal British Columbia Staging Route” with airfields at RCAF Vanderhoof, RCAF Quesnel, RCAF Williams Lake and the most important RCAF Dog Creek.

When No. 135 Squadron flew to join the Americans in their Alaskan Command [RCAF “Y” Wing, Annette, Alaska] on 16 August 1943, they were the first RCAF squadron to fly this interior route, which was still under construction. Now they became the first to return to Patricia Bay, using the same interior route. On 7 September 1944, Lodestar 555 delivered six 170 ferry pilots to Terrace, B.C. at 15:30 hrs. They were assigned Hurricane #5407, #5411, #5418, #5421, #5424 [above] and #5589, departing Terrace, B.C. at 18:00 hrs. The remote RCAF Station Dog Creek had just been installed with night time landing lights, due to the fact it was a most important 24-hour fueling point. [In 1944-1945, this RCAF Station saved the lives of many Canadian and American fuel-starved aircraft] Today it is gone from sight and totally forgotten. Just before midnight, 7 Sept. 1944, the six Hurricane aircraft arrived for fuel, and became the first night-time landing and take-off at RCAF Station Dog Creek. Hurricane 5424 was now flown to Patricia Bay, and next ferried back to Lethbridge, Alberta, by No. 170 Squadron, possibly in November 1944. Possibly placed into storage at No. 2 Reserve Equipment Maintenance Unit, Moose Jaw, Sask., on 5 December 1945. Forty-two aircraft arrived on that date. I cannot find any serial record in any RCAF unit Daily Diary.

No. 3 Bombing and Gunnery School at MacDonald, Manitoba, did not close until 17 February 1945. On 13 September 1944, they had on charge two Hawker Hurricane fighters and received three more on that date, total now five. No serial numbers are listed.

On the 19 September 1945, Hurricane 5424 arrives at No. 8 Repair Depot, Winnipeg, for minor repairs. It is next flown to No. 3 Bombing and Gunnery School, Macdonald, Manitoba, for storage.

Eight months later, spring of 1946, Hurricane #5424 is found in storage at No. 3 S.E.H.U. at Swift Current, Saskatchewan, where it is sold on 15 August 1946. It was later obtained by Lynn Garrison and moved to Calgary, along with Hurricane 5389. 5424 is leased, without any approval by owner Lynn Garrison, to a man in Saskatchewan, where it is secretly sold to a millionaire in U.K. It arrives in England, then it is reported ‘stolen’ to Calgary Police, and nothing can be done. It sits for five years in U.K. with no serial number, then it is registered with a false number. It is sold, and then appears with a new serial number, again false, and now the owners are attempting to flog it to anyone with over two million bucks to thrown away on a false fighter, with a false history. A pure crime of Canadian and British greed, caused by money, which can only be solved by more money. Buy it, return it to Canada, and paint it correctly as 5424.

Hurricane 5424 is the ninth confirmed WWII Canadian Mk. XII Hurricane, out of a total of eleven, which were in storage at No. 3 S.E.H.U. at Swift Current, Saskatchewan, June 1945 to July-August 1946. For many years, it has been rumored this Hurricane flew patrols against the Japanese Fu-go Balloons, however this history is still a mystery. Rivers, Manitoba, had one Spitfire and one Mosquito for tracking balloons drifting that far East.

Thanks to the Japanese Fu-go Balloons, the five [original] Hurricanes assigned to shoot them down, remained protected and stored in Western Canada. That protected them from being scrapped, and three [5389, 5418 and 5447] were purchased by Saskatchewan farmers, preserving our RCAF past, and now they are found in Calgary, Wetaskiwin, and [Vintage Wings of Canada] Ottawa.

The fourth Hurricane 5584 can be found in the Canadian Aviation and Space Museum in Ottawa, sitting beside our Lancaster Mk. X which has been painted incorrectly for the past fifty years.

Collection Pierre Lagacé 2015

Collection Pierre Lagacé 2015

Collection Pierre Lagacé 2015

Collection Pierre Lagacé 2015

Such a beautiful Canadian built Mk. XII Hurricane fighter, with almost no historical information. It flew with No. 163 Squadron, and was placed into “Reserve Storage” a number of times, available for disposal 12 July 1945. On 18 April 1946, retained by RCAF for purpose of display. To the average visitor of “our” Canadian Aviation and Space Museum, this is not a very important or interesting WWII fighter aircraft. But wait, it is most important, provided it receives the correct historical information, and they remove the British spinner from the nose.

The Ottawa Hurricane [today] is displayed with a “Canadian” manufactured spinner, which the average person has no idea about. So, visitors just think it is “British”, and that’s the point I am attempting to make.

Here is a photo which shows a first Canadian spinner, appearing in No. 133 Squadron at Tofino, B.C., March 1944.

Collection Gordon Hill

Only a few Hurricanes received this spinner, as the aircraft was obsolete by 1944, and being replaced by the Kittyhawks. The photo was taken at Tofino, B.C. before the move to Sea Island, Vancouver, on 10 March 1944. This was Hurricane #5377 [“S”] of S/L W.C. Connell, the C.O., and possibly the only one to received this Canadian spinner.

No. 163 [Army Co-operation] Squadron was formed at Sea Island, [Vancouver] B.C. on 1 March 1943. They flew obsolete Bristol Bolingbroke Mk. IV aircraft on West Coast photographic assignments, and the North American Harvard Mk. II, in close support of Army troops in ground training exercises at Camp Wainwright, Alberta. In late June 1943, the squadron was converted to fly the Hurricane Mk. XII fighter and the first two arrived on 5 July 1943. Hurricane #5584 was not only the first to arrive, it became the very first to fly on 11 July 1943, F/L Wilson. 5584 will complete 22 patrols from Sea Island, until end of July 1943, and continue patrols until 13 November 1943.

No. 163 is re-designated a Fighter Squadron on 14 October 1943, and ordered to re-equip with the modern Curtiss Kittyhawk aircraft on 28 November 1943. The last flight of 5584 is on 13 November 1943, F/Sgt. Senecal. By 19 November, the complete squadron has converted to Kittyhawk fighters. Hurricane 5584, 5586 and 5590 are now flown from Sea Island to No. 133 Squadron at Tofino, B.C., on 4 December 1943, and placed into Command Reserve. The squadron is over-strength with fighters and they remain in reserve, never flown, until 4 August 1944. Hurricane 5584 is now returned to No. 2 Training Command, Winnipeg, Manitoba, and placed into storage at an “Aircraft Holding Unit” possibly No. 401 at Swift Current, Sask.

On 1 December 1944, No. 2 Training Command becomes No. 2 Air Command, and 5584 remains in storage. In early March 1945, #5584, #5377, and 5389, are removed from storage and flown to No. 8 Repair Depot, Winnipeg, Manitoba, arriving 12 March 1945. Modification with radio and one 303 Browning machine gun is completed on Hurricane 5584 and 5389, 19 March 1945. They are now flown by No. 170 [Ferry] Squadron pilots to assigned Japanese Fu-go patrol units, and 5389 is assigned Yorkton, Saskatchewan.

On 15 March 1945, F/O W.A. Doyle, #J22160 arrives from Winnipeg, assigned No. 2 R.E.M.U. at Moose Jaw, Sask., a new Hurricane “Fu-go” fighter pilot. Hurricane 5584 arrives on 20 March 1945, and is flown to Rivers, Manitoba, by pilot Doyle on 29 March, [reason unknown] returning to Moose Jaw on 2 April 1945. RCAF Station Rivers Manitoba, had on strength one Spitfire and one Mosquito for tracking Japanese Balloons, and 5584 was possibly involved in training with these fighters.

Hurricane 5584 is air tested on 27 May by pilot Doyle. No Balloons sighted.

Hurricane 5584 is scrambled at 16:00 hrs as a “Crabapple” is sighted 5 miles south of climax, Saskatchewan. This is the first use of the RCAF code word for Japanese Balloons, “CRABAPPLE.”

On 22 August 1945, F/O Hanneson G. J47498 returns Hurricane 5584 to No. 3 S.E.H.U., RCAF, Swift Current, Sask. The fighter is inhibited in November and remains in hangar storage until June 1946.

On 8 December 1945, the RCAF form No. 2 Air Command [H.Q. “K” Composite Flight] at Winnipeg, Manitoba. Assigned aircraft are used for communication, target towing, practice flying, including Canadian “Airshow” flying. On 13 June 1946, F/L Dibnah R.H. and F/O Saidler D. arrive at No. 3 S.E.H.U. Swift Current where they pick up Hurricane 5588 and 5584, flying both back to Winnipeg. On 12-13 July, the two Hurricanes appear in a Winnipeg airshow. On 29 July, both 5588 and 5584 are test flown and head off for an airshow in Edmonton, Alberta. The airshow is held on 26 July 1946, and during an engine run-up, pilot F/O Saidler encounters problems and cannot take part in the airshow. Hurricane 5584 is returned to No 8 Repair Depot on 28 July 1946, for repairs and placed into stored reserve in Manitoba.

In 1960, the new National Aeronautical Museum in Ottawa begins looking for RCAF aircraft to preserve. Hurricane 5584 is discovered in Mountain View, Ontario, where it will soon be scrapped. It is saved and flown to RCAF Uplands, Ottawa, in August 1962, and repainted for public display. This is the most original preserved Canadian built Hurricane Mk. XII in the world, and has always remained property of the taxpayer [Government] of Canada. On 6 February 1964, it went on public display, where it remains today, wearing a British nose spinner.

Today, the Canadian War Museum, Ottawa, have on display an original “Crabapple” Japanese Fu-go bottom [bomb-sand bag] section, without Balloon. Now, if they [Ottawa] could just get this WWII rare artifact together with the Canadian built Hurricane Mk. XII that hunted “Crabapples”, Wow!

Left is part of a “crabapple” recovered at Provost, Alberta, 7 February 1945, and [right] the one recovered at Minton, Saskatchewan, 12 January 1945, and now in the Canadian War Museum Ottawa.

Hurricane 5584 is powered by a Rolls-Royce Merlin engine. Most visitors to the museum take for granted, it was the best engine, and it was British made. Not true, it was the best, but produced in the United States of America!

In 1939, the Canadian Government was in such a rush to support Britain, it signed a contract to produce training aircraft, and in their eagerness forgot about fighter aircraft and protection of Canada. On 9 March 1941, the Canadian Chief of the Air Staff submitted a proposal for the increased of Hurricane fighters for the Defence of Canada, in the Home War Establishment. Canada had no aero-engine industry and they suddenly realized, the American and British produced all front-line combat aircraft engines, and the real shocker was they also controlled the allocation of engines needed for the airframes built in Canada. In brief, there were chronic shortages of aircraft, aero-engines, and spare parts for the war in Europe 1940-41. Up until 7 December 1941, the British and Americans together opposed the allocation of any Canadian built fighters, with American engines, for the protection of Canada. The events in Washington, D.C., after the attack on Pearl Harbor, changed both the British and American thinking, as fighters were now needed for the protected of the West Coast of both Canada and United States.

In September 1940, the American Packard Motor Company, Detroit, Michigan, signed a multi-million-dollar contract to build the British Rolls-Royce Merlin engine for both the American and British Governments. The first American Packard original Merlin 28 was built with the designation V-1650-1 and shown to the American public on 2 August 1941. Canadian Car and Foundry Co. Ltd. also signed a contract with the British Ministry of Aircraft Production for the manufacture of Canadian Hawker Hurricanes for the R.A.F. The first Canadian built Hurricane began flying trials in January 1940, and were delivered to England in the following month. All this history can be found on many websites.

By October 1941, the Packard-built Merlin engines were in full production at Detroit, [Many on the production line were young American ladies] and the second production engine became the Merlin 29. These new engines were shipped from Detroit, to the Can. Car and Foundry plant at Fort William, Ontario, [Now-Thunder Bay] and installed in the Hurricane Mk. XII fighters. The Merlin 29 was a 1,300 h.p. engine manufactured with splined airscrew shaft, fitted with an American built Nash-Kelvinator Hamilton Standard propeller. This American propeller could not accommodate the British made Hurricane spinners, and thus ‘our’ fighters gained a special “Canadian” built-in trademark. They flew without any spinners.

Pilot F/O Gordon Hill began his Hurricane training at No. 1 Operational Training Unit, Bagotville, Quebec, Course #8, on 30 January 1943. His course was delayed by a two-day snow fall, which can be seen in this image, taken around 3 February 1943. This is what Hurricane “Y” looked like, and how Hurricane 5584 should be displayed in Ottawa. England is full of ‘their’ Hurricane fighters, with British spinners. 5584 is the best original Canadian built Hurricane fighter, but to many, a spinner confuses it with a British production aircraft. The original “Crabapple” Hurricane Mk. XII, 5418, in Reynolds Alberta Museum, is displayed correctly, with an American Packard-Rolls-Royce engine displayed beside it.


Canadian Army reports dated 28 March 1945, claim a Japanese Balloon was intercepted and shot down at Strathmore, Alberta. No verified records can be found in any RCAF unit of Station Daily Diary. Two Mitchell B-25 bombers were stationed at Suffield, Alberta, again no record can be found. Tight press censorship was applied to all newspapers, but at times the government allowed some “fake” news to leak out. On 28 May 1945, a Japanese Balloon landed intact at High River, Alberta, just south of Calgary. A reporter for the Calgary Albertan [Calgary Sun today] obtained these photos, but he could not publish until 23 June 1945, and only without revealing location, date, or time.

Fu-Go Balloons in Canada

Released in Japan, during normal winter wind conditions, the Japanese Fire Balloons took approximately 70 hours to reach the west coast of Canada. As would be expected, most balloons with positive identification landed in British Columbia, with 39 found, the last in October 2014. Once they crossed the Rocky Mountains, Alberta discovered 17, then 9 in Saskatchewan, and 5 in Manitoba. It is estimated that 1,000 balloons reached North America and combined, Canadian and American authorities only found, [or reported] 285. That means around 600 are still out there someplace.

This is a list of the positive known balloons [or parts] that were found in Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba, from 1 January 1945 to 15 June 45. March was clearly the month most balloons appeared over the Prairies, and when four Hurricane fighter were flying patrols.
1 January 1945 Stony Rapids, Sask.
12 January 1945 Minton, Sask.
7 February 1945 Provost, Alberta.
9 February 1945 Moose Jaw, Sask.
22 February 1945 Manyberries [Lethbridge] Alberta.
22 February 1945 Porcupine Plains, Sask.
10 March 1945 Nelson House, Manitoba.
11 March 1945 Edson, Alberta.
12 March 1945 Oxford House, Manitoba.
13 March 1945 Baril Lake, Alberta.
14 March 1945 Hay Lake, Alberta.
19 March 1945 Marie Lake, Manitoba.
20 March 1945 Fort Chipewyn, Alberta.
20 March 1945 William Lake, Manitoba.
20 March 1945 Olds, Alberta.
20 March 1945 Wimborne, Alberta.
21 March 1945 Delburne, Alberta.
21 March 1945 Camsell Portage, Sask.
23 March 1945 Athabasca, Alberta.
23 March 1945 Delburne, Alberta.
24 March 1945 Medicine Hat, Alberta.
28 March 1945 Strathmore, Alberta.
29 March 1945 Medicine Hat, Alberta.
30 March 1945 Consul, Sask.
30 March 1945 Waterton Lake, Manitoba.
31 March 1945 Ituna, Sask.
1 April 1945 Yorkton, Sask.
5 May 1945 Stettler, Alberta.
15 May 1945 Kelvington, Sask.
23 May 1945 Milo, Alberta.
28 May 1945 High River, Alberta. Reported in newspaper 23 June 1945.
15 June 1945 Whitecourt, Alberta.

Alberta had two aircraft stationed at RCAF Detachment, Suffield, Alberta. Very little has been recorded or researched on their operation. One B-25 Mitchell bomber KJ641, was on strength in February 1945, and reported in articles, as used to track Japanese Balloons. It appears in the Daily Dairy with a number of different pilots, conducting what they called ‘Local 104” or “Local 101” and other numbers. A Boston Bomber BE410 was also used for camera work, and that’s about all I can make out.

On 7 February 1945, a single Mosquito fighter arrived at 17:00 hrs, with a No. 170 ferry pilot and navigator. They returned to No. 1 R.E.H.U. at Lethbridge, Alberta. The Mosquito was flown by different crews and did special tests called F.E. 291 or F.E. 293, and other code numbers. The tests were conducted at 30,000 feet and recorded on film by the Boston Bomber. The Mosquito remained on strength until 4 April 1945, and then left for Regina, Sask. I believe this was all top secret, involving the Japanese Balloons, during the same time period 22 Balloons were found in the three Prairies provinces. Canadian Government officials were very concerned the balloons were being used to carry a biological war to Canada.

About the Mosquito

I have attached here the RCAF Suffield Daily Diary 7 Feb, and end of month 28 Feb. 45. I believe this RCAF Mosquito worked with the five Hurricanes in Saskatchewan, but I have no further proof.

I think releasing this information is a good time and place.

The known balloons to land in Canada up until 28 August 1945, was 88, which includes N.W.T, and Yukon. Historians report the Japanese stopped releasing balloons in early April 1945, and that is not correct. The High River balloon arrived on 28 May 45, and it was intact, after releasing incendiary bombs and anti-personnel bomb, possibly over the Rocky Mountains of Alberta. The self-destruct bomb mechanism failed to work, and the bomb came down in a farmers field, bouncing along until it hit a fence. This Japanese Fu-Go balloon was launched around 23-24 May, then 70-80 hours later was recovered and flown to Ottawa. One more balloon would be found in Alberta in June 45, and two in Yukon. In July 45, six balloons were found in B.C. and one in Yukon. In August 45, three balloons were found in B.C.

Born and raised on a farm in Southern Alberta, I fully understand the winds that seem to always blow in Alberta. That is the reason many balloons were blown north from United Sates and landed in southern Alberta and Saskatchewan. Right in the middle of this was the location of RCAF Detachment, Suffield, Alberta, today a British Army [restricted] training area. The truth may never be fully released.


The last original “Crabapple” Hurricane fighter 5389

The last original “Crabapple” Hurricane fighter 5389, has been stored outside, lost, forgotten, and almost given away to another millionaire in England. This fighter is truly a survivor, in more ways than I could ever describe.

Hurricane 5389, [in Calgary today] was taken out of No. 2 Reserve Equipment Maintenance Unit, RCAF, Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, in March 1945. It was flown to No. 8 Repair Depot, at Winnipeg, Manitoba, 12 March 1945, along with #5377 and #5584. [in Ottawa today] The modification of radio and one .303 Browning machine gun was completed on 14 March, and No. 170 [Ferry] Squadron flew 5389 to No. 23 E.F.T.S. at Yorkton, Saskatchewan, where it is taken on strength, Daily Diary, [15 March 1945]. No. 23 EFTS did not close until 15 September 1945, and records of all activities appear in Daily Diary, however there is no record of Hurricane pilot, any scramble or sightings of Japanese Balloon, just one Hurricane taken on strength. A second Hurricane 5588 arrived on 10 April 1945, and again is only shown taken on charge. On 24 June 1945, a mobile repair party of five, from No. 8 Repair Depot, complete an M.5 inspection of Hurricane 5389 at Yorkton, Sask. The machine gun is removed and No. 170 [Ferry] squadron fly the fighter back to storage at No. 3 S.E.H.U. Swift Current, Sask. The Daily Diary at Swift Current record shows Hurricane 5389 is inhibited in a hangar on 15 November 1946. In the spring of 1946, the Hurricane is ready for disposal, taken off strength by RCAF and sold by War Assets Corporation on 20 August 1946. The new owner is Mr. Robert R. Hamilton, 3915 Montague St. Regina, Saskatchewan. The Hurricane is placed on a farm outside Regina and forgotten.

During his flying days with No. 403 Squadron in Calgary, Lynn Garrison befriended a young 15-year-old who wanted to be a fighter pilot, Joe E. McGoldrick. Lynn would take him to the airport and left him sit in the Mustangs and Harvard aircraft. When he was old enough, Joe joined the RCAF, but they made him a navigator, so he dropped out, as he wanted to be a pilot. He returned to Calgary and began a concerted effort to become a pilot. He obtained his licence, spent many hours as a flight instructor and was finally accepted by Pacific Western Airlines. During the early days Garrison was forming the Alberta Aviation Museum, Joe was a student pilot in training for navigator, at RCAF Station Winnipeg. On weekends Joe would drive around and locate WWII aircraft. He learned that Hurricane 5389 was for sale and Calgary mechanic Ed Fleming purchased 5389 and 5424 from the farmer owners in Regina, Saskatchewan. Later in 1962, Lynn Garrison was looking for Hurricane fighters and Ed was doing a rebuild of a WWII P-51 Mustang. Lynn Garrison traded a set of Mustang wings, one Packard Merlin 29 engine and a Mustang propeller to Ed Fleming for the two Hurricane fighters, 5424 and 5389. The two Hurricanes were transported to Calgary courtesy of Wolton Lumber Company, and placed in the Shell Oil Pipeline storage yard on Edmonton Trail, Calgary. If you are still interested, more details can be found on the website of The Calgary Mosquito Society.

On 21 December 2011, the City of Calgary awards the restoration of “Crabapple” Hurricane fighter 5389 to the Calgary Mosquito Society. The fighter is moved to Historic Aviation Services in Wetaskiwin on 27 October 2012, for restoration to taxi condition. The restoration is expected to be completed a year from now, summer 2018. Today [September 2017] only three RCAF original “Crabapple” Hurricane fighters survive, and two are back together at Wetaskiwin, Alberta.

Next Chapter – The WWII pilot who flew Hurricane 5389, 94-year-old F/O Gordon Hill, from Calgary, Alberta.

Update – “Crabapple” Fighter, Hurricane Mk. XII, serial #814, RCAF 5389

Comment made on February 22, 2019

I enjoyed very much reading this. Great work! I do have some details of Hawker Hurricane 5588 that is mentioned above. My Uncle (Rod Davidge, originally from Alberta), who had served overseas with the RAF 193 Typhoon Sqd. (130 missions), was eventually repatriated back to Canada late in 1944. He resumed his service with the RCAF helping out with flight training new pilots late January, 1945. He was assigned to 3 SFTS in Calgary and then later to Rivers, MB. On April 24th his flight log shows him being flown to Yorkton, SK where he picked up Hurricane 5588 and flew it to Moose Jaw, Sk. On the 25th he was to ferry 5588 to Calgary but weather interfered as he got close to Calgary. I don’t believe he had a radio in the aircraft. Low on fuel he was able to put 5588 down at a ranch/farm in the Eagle Butte area of southern Saskatchewan. He finally made it safely to Calgary on April 28th. He continued to fly 5588 during May, June and into July, 1945. His last logged flight was on July 2nd and he was scrambled after a Japanese Balloon spotted along the foothills. Although he did say he had seen one of the balloons near the US border, I don’t think he ever fired a shot at one. If interested I can provide a digital copy of his flight log for this period of my Uncle’s RCAF career.

Cheers,

Doug Davidge

Exclusive research done by Clarence Simonsen about the little History of “Crabapple” Fighter, Hurricane Mk. XII, serial #814, RCAF 5389


“Crabapple” Fighter, Hurricane Mk. XII, serial #814, RCAF 5389

By Clarence Simonsen

RCAF Hurricane 5389 was constructed by the Canadian Car and Foundry factory in Fort William, Ontario, on the western tip of Lake Superior in May 1942.

The first production Hurricane Mk. XII aircraft serial RCAF 5376 was retained at the factory in Fort William for testing and was not assigned to the RCAF until taken on strength 6 August 1943. The next 25 production new Hurricane Mk. XII [serial 5377 to 5401] aircraft were flown directly by No. 124 ferry pilots to No. 4 Training Command at Calgary, Alberta, or their Ferry Detachment at Lethbridge, Alberta, then later assigned to No. 133 [Falcon] Squadron which was formed at Lethbridge, Alberta, on 3 June 1942.

The first Air Force Ferry Squadron was formed at Air Force Headquarters, RCAF Station, Rockcliffe, [Ottawa] Ontario, on 24 December 1941, Organization Order 173, Flight Lieutenant H. O. Madden [C1407] was approved as the first Ferry Squadron Commander. On 14 February 1942, they were officially numbered No. 124 [Ferry] Squadron, formed for the purpose of inter-command ferrying of all RCAF aircraft across Canada, with detachments located in Eastern Division at Moncton, New Brunswick, Montreal, Quebec, Megantic, Quebec, Malton, [Toronto] Ontario, North Bay, Ontario, Kapuskasing, Ontario, and Western Division at Armstrong, Ontario, Regina, Saskatchewan, Lethbridge, Alberta, Cranbrook, B.C. and Penticton, B.C. The Daily Diary records the first ferry aircraft were Oxford AT533 and AS6596 delivered to R.A.F. Station Penhold, Alberta, on 4 January 1942, before they were officially numbered 124 [Ferry] Squadron.

The month of June 1942, became a busy period for No. 124 [Ferry] Squadron as new Canadian built Hawker Hurricane Mk. XII aircraft were being delivered from the factory in Fort William to new formed units in Eastern and Western Canada. The Daily Diary records the number of aircraft delivered but no aircraft individual serial number is recorded. The No. 124 squadron ferry pilot who delivered Hurricane 5389 is not known, however this fighter was taken on charge by RCAF on 23 June 1942, and assigned to No. 133 [F] Squadron in the next few days.

Hurricane aircraft serial 5377 to 5382 were taken on charge by the RCAF 16 January 1942, and later in June delivered by 124 [Ferry] Squadron to No. 133 at Lethbridge, AB, which is recorded in the Daily Diary of squadron operations. Between 24 June and 30 June 1942, No. 124 Squadron will ferry 53 aircraft to allotted units and a large percentage are new Hurricane fighters, including 5389.

This RCAF photo [PL12324] which was a posed image taken at No. 133 Squadron at Lethbridge, Alberta, records two new Hurricane aircraft #5383 without code letter and #5398 [March of Dimes] with code “L” painted on fuselage. This was most likely taken around the end of July 1942, when the squadron was busy with training and painting code letters on their new Hurricane fighters.

The No. 133 Daily Diary records the following for 17 July 1942 – Hurricane “March of Dimes” aircraft No. 5398, together with No. 5395 arrived at his unit at 19:00 hrs from Fort William, Ontario.

Hurricane # 5398 was first ferried to Calgary from Fort William on 15 July 1942 and was officially taken on charge by the RCAF. This was a special presentation aircraft with the “March of Dimes” painted on both sides of the nose panel in white lettering.

Photo taken at No. 4 Training Command Headquarters, Calgary, Alberta, 15 July 1942.

 

No. 133 Squadron Commanding Officer received the new presentation fighter at Lethbridge, Alberta, 17 July 1942, newspaper clipping on left. The nose lettering reads – ‘CONTRIBUTIONS TO CANADA “MARCH OF DIMES” HELPED TO PURCHASE THE AEROPLANE.’

On 4 February 1943, No. 133 [Falcon] Squadron were based at Boundry Bay. B.C., conducting normal patrols and training exercises. P/O Grover Stewart Sargent, J11976, was assigned a night time map reading exercise [flying Hurricane 5398, “L”] to the training area at Pender Island, then west to Patricia Bay, fuel, and return to base at Boundary Bay. He never arrived at Patricia Bay and the next morning his body was recovered near Pender Island. The crash site has never been found, and the cause is unknown. The body of Pilot Officer Sargent, age 20 years, was returned to Quebec, where he was buried in Lake View Cemetery, Pointe-Claire, Quebec.

All Hurricane fighters were painted at Fort William in R.A.F. colors for period June 1940 to June 1942.

Aircraft code letters were painted on at assigned RCAF units as shown above.

This records the correct 1942 roundel markings on the Canadian Hurricane fighters that were delivered from Fort William to RCAF Home War Establishment units. Upper roundel was type “B” red and blue, under wing was type “A. II” and fuselage was type A. I, red, white, blue and matt yellow.

Hurricane RCAF 5389 was the thirteenth fighter delivered to the RCAF and taken on charge 23 June 1942 at Calgary, Alberta, delivered to Lethbridge two days later. The fighter was painted with the code letter “M” and began general pilot training on 1 July 42, where Hurricane flying time was recorded at 23:15 hrs. On 2 July 42, Wing Commander Gray arrived by air at 11:00 hrs to arrange the allotment of three No. 133 Hurricane aircraft for pilot training at No. 135 Squadron at Mossbank, Saskatchewan. On 8 July 42, RCAF Hurricane 5385, 5386 and 5389 were transferred to No. 135 [Bulldog] Squadron at Mossbank, Saskatchewan for pilot training. They arrived at Mossbank the next day, recorded in Diary. Pilots were S/L Brookes, P/O Sargent, [killed 4 February 1943, March of Dimes] and F/Sgt. Shavalier.

[It is recorded in the No. 135 [Bulldog] Squadron Daily Diary that all pilots had been fully trained and soloed in the Hurricane fighter aircraft by 17 July 1942. It should also be recorded that Hurricane 5389 trained many of the first RCAF fighter pilots in No. 135 ‘Bulldog’ Squadron].
It is most likely Hurrican

e 5389 received a new 135 squadron code letter, and possibly even the nose art of the 135 “Bulldog” appeared on her engine covering for a few weeks.

No. 135 pilot George Lawson in front of Hurricane “U”, at Mossbank, Sask., 13 July 1942, which could possibly be one of the loaned fighters, 5386, 5385 or [Calgary] 5389, with Bulldog nose art.

On 26 July 1942, Hurricane 5385 and 5389 are returned to No. 133 Squadron from Mossbank, Sask. RCAF Hurricane 5386 returns to Lethbridge on 31 July 42.

27 July 1942, Mr. E. J. Sousby, General Manager of Canadian Car and Foundry Co. arrives for a special meeting to discuss the new Hurricane aircraft. The following day all Hurricane Mk. XII aircraft are being tested by the flying instructors for a detailed report on their general condition, which will be sent to the Fort William factory.

On 31 July 1942, Officer Commanding No. 133 Squadron, S/Leader W. T. Brooks, reports 24 Hurricane and 6 Harvard aircraft on strength, only 9 Hurricane fighters are serviceable. 28 August 1942, at 15:20 hrs. Hurricane 5380 makes a crash landing on aerodrome and is a total loss. F/Sgt. Pilot E. B. Monypenny R108600 is suspended from further flying. This is the first Hurricane lost and not taken off charge until 11 February 1943. On 12 May 1943, F/Sgt. Monypenny lost control of Hurricane 5383 at 1,500 ft over base, crashed and was killed.

Pilot Eric Burk Monypenny

On 31 August 1942, No. 133 Squadron has 13 officers and 199 airmen on strength, 23 Hurricane aircraft and 6 Harvard trainers. Total Hurricane flying training time for the month is 30:55 hrs day and 7:30 hrs night. 15 September 1942, Captain D. M. Howard, Chief Test Pilot, Canadian Boeing Aircraft, Co. arrives to test all of the squadron Hurricane aircraft.

23 September 1942, S/L Brooks advises the Squadron they will be moving to Boundary Bay, B. C. in October. The advance party depart by rail for Boundary Bay on 30 September 1942. At 17:00 hrs that same day, [30 Sept.] No. 135 squadron [Bulldogs] arrive for fuel with 19 Hurricane aircraft on their southern route to Sea Island, [Vancouver] B.C. The “Bulldogs” will become the first RCAF Fighter Squadron to fly from Lethbridge, Alberta, to Spokane, Washington, Yakima, Washington, and then to Sea Island, [Vancouver] B.C., No. 133 Squadron will follow this same route on 5 October 1942.

No. 133 [Falcon] Squadron patrolled the Canadian section [orange] however, unknown to many Americans, they also patrolled and were even stationed from Bellingham to Tacoma, Washington, [yellow]. This is covered in detail with Daily Diary records in chapter on pilot Gordon Hill.

Secret orders – 8 December 1942- Daily Diary

October 4th, ground personnel consisting of 135 Airmen and Officers, departed from Lethbridge at 23:59 hrs by special C.P.R. train, under supervision of flying Officer Thompson. October 5th, 16 Hurricane and 4 Harvard aircraft, under the supervision of Squadron Leader W. T. Brooks, depart from Lethbridge at 07:20 hrs via Spokane [fuel] and Yakima [fuel-image below], arriving Boundary Bay at 16:00 hrs same day.

After the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, the United States government moved quickly to organize, purchase, or lease local airports to be used as Military training airfields. In the State of Washington, 17 municipal and local civilian airports would be used as military airfields, with new expanded runways, new constructed hangars, and many other improvements. Most of these airfields had been constructed in the 1930’s depression era with funds provided by the United States Works Progress Administration and the Public Work Administration. Three of these airfields became the main Hurricane aircraft ferry route from Alberta to the West Coastal RCAF Stations which were being constructed in 1941-1942.

Felts Field, Spokane, was constructed in 1927, home to the Air National Guard/116th Observation Squadron. It was named in honor of pilot Buell Felts, killed 30 May 1927. During WWII the airfield served as a Civilian Pilots Training Program and provided the USAAF with thousands of pilots. It also became the first ferry fuel stop for RCAF aircraft [No. 135 Bulldogs and No. 133 Falcon] leaving Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada, for Sea Island and boundary Bay, B.C.

McAllister Flying School, Yakima, Washington was cleared of sagebrush in 1926 by Charles McAllister and the first building was completed in 1928, which still survives today. Above is the Yakima Air Terminal in 1940, the same sight the Hurricane pilots of No. 133 Squadron saw on 5 October 1942. This became the second important ferry flight fuel stop for RCAF aircraft, and during WWII the base was part of the Civilian Pilot Training Program.

Bellingham Army Airfield was constructed in 1936, the runway was paved in 1940, and it officially opened on 7 December 1941, the same day the Japanese struck at Pearl Harbor. On 10 December 1941, the U. S. Army moved in and constructed 38 new hangars and buildings, expanded and constructed two more runways, making a major facility for bombers and fighter aircraft. This became the main American base for the protection and defending of Puget Sound area, shared by No. 133 Squadron of the RCAF north at Boundary Bay, B. C. The Daily Operations Record for No. 133 Squadron record many flights in and out of Bellingham Army Airfield, including that of Hurricane fighter 5389.

On 5 October 1942, this Army Airfield provided an emergency stop over for the ferry flight of No. 133 Squadron 16 Hurricane fighters and 4 Harvard trainer aircraft. No RCAF ferry aircraft were required to land at Bellingham Army Airfield. On landing [Boundary Bay] Hurricane 5399, pilot F/Sgt. J. A. Leslie, makes a hard landing [the runways are still under construction] and the aircraft is damaged as Cat. “C” crash.

Two of the squadron Hurricane 5391 and 5392 were left at Lethbridge as they required new Merlin engines, which were being shipped from Fort William. October 12th, Wing Commander Gray and Flight Lt. Assheton arrived at Boundary Bay at 17:25 hrs in Hurricane 5391 and 5392.

The Squadron diary notes –

Housing condition was very poor and inadequate. The Senior NCO’s and airmen were placed in various uncomfortable sections of the station. Civilian construction personnel occupying 2 H-huts and Airmen’s Mess. One hangar is remodeled and at once lectures, physical training and organized sports are started while ground crews attempt their normal duties. The Squadron consists of 29 pilots, 27 trained for overseas duty, 17 Hurricane aircraft and 2 Harvard ready for instrument training. Due to the fact the runways are still under construction no hours of actual flight training are allowed.

The No. 133 Squadron Operations Record [below] states – NOTE –

We submit a “Nil Report” for this period, Oct. 1st to Oct. 26th, 1942, inclusive as the runways at this station are under construction.

The first Hurricane to officially take to the air at Boundary Bay, B.C. was recorded as Hurricane 5389, pilot F/O F. H. Sproule, Practice Scramble, 11:00 to 11:20 hrs, 27 October 1942 [20 minutes].

1 November 1942, strength of unit is :

RCAF Officers [Aircrew] 7,

Ground Crew Officers 2,

Airmen Aircrew 18 and Ground crew 173.

RAF Officers – 4.

Aircraft service ability

Hurricane 12,

Harvard 2.

Duties – Local flying of Sector Reconnaissance, Hurricane Scrambles, and Instrument flying in Harvard aircraft. Each month, five qualified fighter pilots will be posted overseas and replaced by five new graduates from Service Flying Training Schools in Canada.

This RCAF pilot training produced new Canadian fighter pilots for mostly England and gave coastal protection for Canadian Home War Establishment against possible Japanese attack. Only 14 flights had taken place in the month of October and now November would prove to be the break-in period for No. 133 [F] Squadron RCAF.

The total number of flights, date, and pilot name, are now listed for RCAF Hurricane [Calgary] 5389.

November 1942

Hurricane 5389 will make 17 flights in the month of November, which totals 13:25 hrs.

1 November 1942 Sgt. Millar G. G. 9:20 to 10:20 hrs Sector Reconnaissance
1 November 1942 F/Sgt. Curtis W. S. 10:35 to 11:30 hrs Sector Recon.
7 November 1942 P/O D. C. Laubman 15:40 to 16:45 hrs Formation Training
8 November 1942 F/Sgt. Tomlinson C. J 09:40 to 10:40 hrs Formation Training
8 November 1942 P/O D. C. Laubman 15:40 to 1645 hrs Formation Training
10 November 1942 F/Sgt. Walton N. R. 11:10 to 12:10 hrs Practice Scramble
13 November 1942 F/Sgt. McGowan J. G. 10:50 to 11:35 hrs Formation Flying
13 November 1942 Sgt. Costello G. A. 10:20 to 11:20 hrs Formation Flying
15 November 1942 Sgt. Monypenny E. B. 10:55 to 11:55 hrs Formation Flying
18 November 1942 P/O L. R. Brooks 15:10 to 15:40 hrs Scramble
19 November 1942 F/O F. H. Sproule 12:00 to 12:15 hrs Scramble
23 November 1942 Sgt. Young F. B. 13:25 to 13:40 hrs Scramble
24 November 1942 Sgt. Costello G. A. 11:30 to 12:20 hrs Scramble
24 November 1942 F/O R. M. Tracy 15:15 to 15:30 hrs Aircraft Test
27 November 1942 P/O L. R. Allman 16:15 to 17:05 hrs Air Test
28 November 1942 F/Sgt. Walton N. R. 09:35 to 10:35 hrs Squadron drill
28 November 1942 F/ Sgt. R. F. Gainforth 14:00 to 14:40 hrs Squadron Drill

December 1942

1 December 1942, 17 Hurricanes on strength and 5389 will make 13 flights.
1 December 1942 P/O L.R. Allman
1 December 1942 F/Sgt. McGowan J. G.
13 December 1942 P/O L. R. Allman
13 December 1942 P/O G. S. Sargent
14 December 1942 P/O G. S. Sargent
20 December 1942 F/Sgt. Shavalier R.
22 December 1942 F/Sgt. Le Gear F. S.
23 December 1942 P/O D. C. Laubman
30 December 1942 F/Sgt. Law R. R.
30 December 1942 Sgt. Dalsell D. J.
30 December 1942 F/O R. N. Gull
31 December 1942 F/O F. H. Sproule
31 December 1942 Sgt. Gaskin R. A.

January 1943

1 January 1943, 15 Hurricanes on strength and 5389 will make 11 flights.
3 January 1943 Sgt. Young F. B.
4 January 1943 F/Lt. R. W. Mc Nair [DFC] local formation flying.
7 January 1943 F/O F. H. Sproule
7 January 1943 F/O G. S. Sargent
11 January 1943 S/L W. T. Breeks
14 January 1943 P/O D. C. Laubman
27 January 1943 F/Sgt. Walton N. R.
28 January 1943 Sgt. Dalzell D. J.
29 January 1943 P/O R. M. Tracy
30 January 1943 F/Sgt. Law R.R.
31 January 1943 F/Sgt. R. F. Gainforth.

February 1943

1 February 1943, 17 Hurricanes on strength 5389 assigned 31 flights
2 February 1943 F/Sgt. W. S. Curtis
2 February 1943 Sgt. E. E. Grissom
3 February 1943 F/Sgt. H. F. Wakeman
3 February 1943 F/Sgt. R. F. Gainforth

On 4 February 1943, Pilot Officer G. S. Sargent is assigned to fly Hurricane 5398, “March of Dimes” presentation fighter, on a routine map reading night-time exercise. The aircraft never arrives at Patricia Bay, and next morning a search is conducted. The body of pilot Sargent is found.

Mayne, Saturna and North and South Pinder Islands were used by No. 133 squadron for many training flights, conducted between home base at Boundary Bay and Patricia Bay, on Vancouver Island. A number of Hurricane fighters crashed into the waters around these islands, in 1943, 1944 and 1945.

 

6 February 1943 F/Sgt. A. J. Ness

11 February 1943 F/O R. N. Gull
11 February 1943 F/Sgt A J. Ness
11 February 1943 F/Sgt. F. S. Le Gear
12 February 1943 F/ Sgt. F. S. Le Gear
12 February 1943 F/Sgt. F. S. Le Gear
16 February 1943 Sgt. D. J. Dalsell
19 February 1943 F/L E. H. Treleaven
19 February 1943 F/Sgt. F. S. Le Gear
20 February 1943 Sgt. F. B. Young
20 February 1943 F/O F. H. Sproule
21 February 1943 F/Sgt. W. S. Curtis
21 February 1943 P/O L. R. Allman
22 February 1943 Sgt. Gaskin R. A.
22 February 1943 Sgt. E. E. Grissom
22 February 1943 P/O L. R. Allman
23 February 1943 F/Sgt. H. F. Wakeman
23 February 1943 P/O L. R. Allman
23 February 1943 F/Sgt. F. S. Le Gear
25 February 1943 Sgt. F. B. Young
25 February 1943 Sgt. E. E. Grissom
27 February 1943 P/O L. R. Allman
27 February 1943 F/O R. M. Tracy
27 February 1943 F/Sgt J. A. Leslie
28 February 1943 P/O L. R. Allman
28 February 1943 Sgt. F. B. Young.

March 1943

1 March 1943, 17 Hurricane on strength, 5389 assigned 34 flights
2 March 1943 F/Sgt. C. J. Tomlinson
3 March 1943 F/Sgt. C. J. Tomlinson
5 March 1943 P/O L. R. Allman
5 March 1943 Sgt. E. E. Grissom
7 March 1943 F/Sgt. H. F. Wakeman
7 March 1943 F/Sgt. A. J. Ness
7 March 1943 P/O G. G. Millar
9 March 1943 F/Sgt/ R. A. Gaskin
10 March 1943 F/Sgt. W. S. Curtis
10 March 1943 P/O L. R. Allman
11 March 1943 F/Sgt. J. A. Leslie
11 March 1943 F/Sgt. F. S. Le Gear
13 March 1943 F/Sgt. R. Shavalier
15 March 1943 P/O D. C. Laubman
16 March 1943 F/Sgt. W.S. Curtis
16 March 1943 F/Sgt. J. A. Leslie
17 March 1943 F/Sgt. F. S. Le Gear
17 March 1943 F/Sgt. F. S. Le Gear
17 March 1943 F/Sgt. F. S. Le Gear
19 March 1943 F/Sgt. C. J. Tomlinson
19 March 1943 F/Sgt. C. J. Tomlinson
20 March 1943 F/Sgt. G. A. Costello
20 March 1943 F/Sgt. G. A. Costello
25 March 1943 F/Sgt. C. J. Tomlinson
25 March 1943 F/Sgt. C. J. Tomlinson
25 March 1943 F/Sgt. C. J. Tomlinson
25 March 1943 F/Sgt. C. J. Tomlinson
25 March 1943 F/Sgt. C. J. Tomlinson
26 March 1943 P/O G. G. Millar
28 March 1943 F/Sgt. J. A. Leslie
28 March 1943 F/Sgt. F. B. Young
29 March 1943 F/Sgt. N. R. Walton
29 March 1943 F/Sgt. W.S. Curtis
29 March 1943 F/Sgt. E. B. Monypenny

April 1943

1 April 1943, 16 Hurricanes on strength, 5389 assigned 35 flights
1 April 1943 F/Sgt. W. S. Curtis
2 April 1943 Sgt. E. E. Grissom
2 April 1943 F/Sgt. C. J. Tomlinson
3 April 1943 F/Sgt. H. F. Wakeman
4 April 1943 Sgt. E. E. Grissom
4 April 1943 F/Sgt. C. J. Tomlinson
4 April 1943 Sgt. E. E. Grissom
5 April 1943 F/O F. H. Sproule
5 April 1943 Sgt. E. E. Allman
6 April 1943 P/O L. R. Allman
8 April 1943 F/O F. H. Sproule
9 April 1943 F/Sgt. C. J. Tomlinson
10 April 1943 F/Sgt. R. F. Gainforth
11 April 1943 F/Sgt. G. A. Costello
11 April 1943 F/O F. H. Sproule
12 April 1943 F/O F. H. Sproule
13 April 1943 F/O J. M. Ingalls
13 April 1943 F/O J. M. Ingalls
14 April 1943 F/Sgt. F. B. Young
14 April 1943 F/Sgt. F. B. Young
15 April 1943 F/Sgt. E. B. Monypenny
15 April 1943 F/Sgt. J. A. Leslie
15 April 1943 F/O F. H. Sproule
18 April 1943 P/O J. G. McGowan
18 April 1943 F/Sgt. H. F. Wakeman
18 April 1943 F/O J. M. Ingalls
18 April 1943 F/Sgt. F. B. Young
18 April 1943 F/O F. H. Sproule
19 April 1943 F/O J. M. Ingalls
19 April 1943 F/Sgt. F. B. Young
19 April 1943 F/O R. W. Ferguson
19 April 1943 F/Sgt. F. S. Le Gear
21 April 1943 F/Sgt. E. B. Monypenny
28 April 1943 F/O D. C. Laubman
29 April 1943 F/Sgt. W. S. Curtis.

May 1943

1 May 1943, 6 Officers and 17 Airmen, 19 Hurricanes on strength, 5389 assigned 49 flights.
2 May 1943 F/O R. M. Tracy
2 May 1943 F/Lt. J. B. McCall
2 May 1943 F/O R. M. Tracy
2 May 1943 F/O L. R. Allman
3 May 1943 F/O D. C. Laubman
5 May 1943 F/Sgt. R. F. Gainforth
5 May 1943 F/Sgt. G. J. Tomlinson
6 May 1943 P/O R.R. Law
6 May 1943 P/O R. R. Law
6 May 1943 F/O F. H. Sproule
7 May 1943 F/O R. W. Ferguson
8 May 1943 Sgt. D. J. Dalsell
8 May 1943 F/Sgt. F. S. le Gear
8 May 1943 F/Sgt. F. S. Le Gear
9 May 1943 P/O J. G. McGowan
9 May 1943 F/O R. M. Tracy
9 May 1943 F/Lt. J. B. McCall
9 May 1943 P/O J. G. McGowan
9 May 1943 F/Sgt. R. A. Gaskin
10 May 1943 Sgt. D. J. Dalsell
10 May 1943 F/Lt. J. B. Deek

On 11 May 1943, two new pilots reported to No. 133 squadron, P/O T. W. Wann and Sgt. Gordon M. Hill. The next day, 12 May, F/Sgt. Monypenny was killed flying Hurricane 5383.

Source Facebook page Boundary Bay 1941-1945 

14 May 1943 F/Sgt. R. Shavalier
14 May 1943 F/Sgt. L. R. Allman

15 May 1943 Sgt. Gordon M. Hill [R14282] first flight in Hurricane 5389.

Gordon M. Hill Course #65, continued his pilot training in fall of 1942, No. 13 S. F. T. S. St. Hubert, Quebec. He graduated and received his “Wings” on 22 January 1943, posted to No. 1 Operational Training Unit at Bagotville, Quebec, training Hurricane pilots. Course #8 began on 30 January 1943 and 29 pupils graduated as Hurricane pilots on 23 April 1943. Two pilots were posted to Eastern Air Command of Home War Establishment, while P/O Wann and Sgt. Hill were posted to Western Air Command, No. 133 Squadron at Boundary Bay. B.C.

Graduation photo – 22 January 1943

The full RCAF career of pilot F/O Gordon Hill will be covered in two complete chapters, with over 400 unpublished photos, and new art work.

15 May 1943 F/O F. H. Sproule
16 May 1943 F/Sgt. W. S. Curtis
17 May 1943 F/Sgt. R. Shavalier
18 May 1943 P/O T. W. Wann
18 May 1943 P/O T. W. Wann
18 May 1943 F/O R. M. Tracy
19 May 1943 F/O R. M. Tracy
20 May 1943 P/O R. R. Law
20 May 1943 P/O R. R. Law
20 May 1943 F/O R. M. Tracy
20 May 1943 F/O R. M. Tracy
23 May 1943 F/Sgt. H. F. Wakeman
23 May 1943 Sgt. G. M. Hill
23 May 1943 F/Sgt. H. F. Wakeman
24 May 1943 F/O L. R. Allman
24 May 1943 F/O L. R. Allman
25 May 1943 F/Sgt. W. S. Curtis
25 May 1943 P/O J. M. Ingalls
25 May 1943 F/Sgt. F. S. Le Gear
26 May 1943 F/Sgt. C. J. Tomlinson
26 May 1943 F/Sgt. R. Shavalier
28 May 1943 P/O T. W. Wann
31 May 1943 Sgt. G. M. Hill
31 May 1943 P/O R. R. Law
31 May 1943 F/O F. H. Sproule

June 1943

1 June 1943, 15 Hurricane on strength, 5389 assigned 47 flights.
1 June 1943 Sgt. G. M. Hill
1 June 1943 F/L J. B. McCall
1 June 1943 F/L J. B. McCall
1 June 1943 F/Sgt. F. S. Le Gear
2 June 1943 F/L J. B. McCall
3 June 1943 F/O F. H. Sproule
4 June 1943 F/Sgt. H. F. Wakeman
4 June 1943 F/Sgt. H. F. Wakeman
5 June 1943 F/Sgt. H. F. Wakeman
5 June 1943 F/Sgt. N.F. Wakeman
5 June 1943 F/Sgt. R. A. Gaskin
6 June 1943 F/Sgt. R. A. Gaskin
6 June 1943 WO2 W. S. Curtis
6 June 1943 Sgt. G. M. Hill [13:00) to 14:00 hrs – submarine search]
6 June 1943 Sgt. D. J. Dalsell
7 June 1943 F/L J. B. McCall
7 June 1943 F/Sgt. R. A. Gaskin
7 June 1943 Sgt. D. J. Dalsell
7 June 1943 F/Sgt. J. A. Leslie
7 June 1943 W02 W.S. Curtis
7 June 1943 W02 W. S. Curtis
8 June 1943 W02 W. S. Curtis
8 June 1943 W02 W. S. Curtis
9 June 1943 P/O R. R. Law
9 June 1943 W02 W. S. Curtis
9 June 1943 F/Sgt. R. A. Gaskin
10 June 1943 F/O R. M. Tracy
11 June 1943 W02 A. J. Ness
12 June 1943 W02 A. J. Ness
13 June 1943 W02 R. F. Gainforth
13 June 1943 F/Sgt. R. A. Gaskin
13 June 1943 W02 R. F. Gainforth
13 June 1943 W02 R. F. Gainforth
17 June 1943 W02 F. S. LeGear
18 June 1943 F/O T. W. Wann
18 June 1943 F/Sgt. R. A. Gaskin
19 June 1943 F/O L. R. Allman
21 June 1943 Sgt. D. J. Dalsell
22 June 1943 Sgt. D. J. Dalsell
22 June 1943 F/O R. M. Tracy
22 June 1943 F/O R. M. Tracy
23 June 1943 F/Sgt. R. A. Gaskin
23 June 1943 F/L J. B. McCall
23 June 1943 F/O L. R. Allman
24 June 1943 W02 R. W. Ferguson
27 June 1943 W02 A. J. Ness
28 June 1943 F/L J. B. McCall

 

The last scramble at Boundry Bay, B.C. is recorded on 30 June 1943, 08:00 to 08:50 hrs when two Hurricane aircraft 5395 and 5397 complete a sea patrol. The squadron now prepare for the movement to Tofino, B.C.

Fourteen Hurricane Mk. XII fighter aircraft and two Harvard Mk. IIB aircraft fly to the new base at Tofino, B. C. Hurricane 5389 is piloted by F/O R. W. Ferguson and his flight time is 15:45 to 17:00 hrs.

July 1943

The squadron begin operations on 5 July and Hurricane 5389 will make 19 flights in the month of July 1943.

5 July 1943 W02 A. J. Ness
5 July 1943 F/O J. M. Ingalls
6 July 1943 P/O J. G. McGowan
6 July 1943 W02 J. A. Leslie
9 July 1943 W02 W.S. Curtis
9 July 1943 W02 W. S. Curtis
9 July 1943 Sgt. G. M. Hill Formation Attack – 14:10 to 15:00 hrs.
10 July 1943 F/O V. J. Le Gear
11 July 1943 F/Sgt. J. V. Burke
11 July 1943 W02 J. A. Leslie
11 July 1943 F/O T. W. Wann
12 July 1943 W02 J. A. Leslie
12 July 1943 W02 J. A. Leslie
12 July 1943 W02 J. A. Leslie
12 July 1943 W/C C. N. Greenway
13 July 1943 F/Sgt. J. V. Burke
13 July 1943 F/Sgt. R. A. Gaskin
14 July 1943 P/O R. H. Brown
14 July 1943 P/O F. D. Hague 15:05 to 16:15 hrs., – “Crashed” Cat. “B”.

 

On 22 July 1943, Hurricane 5389 is loaded onto a ship and transported to No. 13 Aeronautical Inspection District, Vancouver, B. C. [Coates Ltd.] for repairs. Hurricane 5389 remained at No. 13 A.I.D. until 15 March 1944.

In the fall of 1938, the RCAF decided to create repair units close to major aircraft companies in Canada. This allowed technically experienced civilian personnel to assist aircraft contractors and report back to the RCAF Headquarters on how repair work was being carried out as well as inspections on the quality of repair work. These new units were designated as RCAF Technical Detachments and given numbers. No. 11 T.D. – Montreal, Quebec, No. 12 T.D. – Toronto, Ontario, No. 13 T.D. – Vancouver, B. C., No. 14 T. D. – Ottawa, Ontario, No. 15 T. D. – Winnipeg, Manitoba, No. 16 T. D. – Edmonton, Alberta, and No. 17 T. D. at Halifax, Nova Scotia. In 1940, these units were re-designated as RCAF Aeronautical Inspection Districts and formerly No. 13 Technical Detachment became No. 13 A.I.D. at Vancouver, B.C. also called “Coates Ltd” for the civilian company. In July 1943, a significant number of RCAF aircraft required repair work and to assist this high demand a priority system was established. The Canadian built Hurricane fighters were no longer a front line aircraft and they took a backseat to repair of other important aircraft. Hurricane 5389 would remain [parked] under repair when time permitted, at No. 13 A.I.D. Vancouver, B. C. for the next eight months.

No. 133 [Falcon] Fighter Squadron continued to fly Hurricane aircraft on West Coast air defence from Tofino, B. C., until 9 March 1944, when they were transferred to Sea Island, [Vancouver] B.C. This became part of what many historians call the “RCAF musical chairs” when complete squadrons moved from base to base and switched aircraft from squadron to squadron.

This has caused many problems for Internet historians and fogged over the true history of Hurricane 5389. Fortunately, the wartime Daily Diaries of both No. 133 and 135 squadrons are very detailed and contain a wealth of information on what in fact took place.

On 10 March 1944, [above record Daily Diary] No. 133 Squadron ferried 17 of their original Hurricane Mk. XII fighters from Tofino, to Patricia Bay, and then to Sea Island, [Vancouver, B.C. F/O Gordon Hill flew Hurricane 5378 to Sea Island, Vancouver, B. C. These Hurricanes are now parked [Vancouver] and No. 133 Squadron will receive 18 Kittyhawk fighters, Mk. I, [11] Mk. IA, [2] and Mk. III [5] aircraft transferred from No. 163 Squadron, which will be disbanded at Patricia Bay, B. C. on 15 March 1944.

To add to this confusion, we have 16 ex-135 Hurricane fighters parked at Terrace, B.C.
No. 135 [Bulldog] Squadron began to ferry their 16 Hurricane fighters [plus two Harvard trainers] from Annette Island, Alaska, [U. S. Command] to Terrace, B.C. on 17 November 1943. They flew patrols from Terrace until 29 February 1944 when they stood down until 11 March 1944, pending a move to Patricia Bay, B.C. They left their original Hurricane aircraft at Terrace, B.C. and the pilots were ferried to Patricia Bay. B. C. on 12 March 1944. No. 170 [Ferry] Squadron began moving the 16 Hurricanes fighters to Patricia Bay on 31 March 1944. The last #5579 arrived at Patricia Bay, B.C. 31 January 1945.

The No. 135 Squadron Daily Diary for 12 March 1944 records – “Arrived Vancouver, Sunday Morning at 10:00 hrs. The party split at C.N.R. Depot and 18 pilots led by S/L Smith [Sqdn. O. C.] proceeding to Sea Island to ferry Hurricane aircraft which formerly operated by No. 133 [F] Squadron. Upon arrival at Sea Island it was discovered only 15 Hurricanes were available, and three Harvard. The party under S/L Smith, piloted the Hurricanes over to Patricia Bay and arrived at 12:00 hrs.

These 15 original No. 133 Squadron Hurricane aircraft are now transferred to No. 135 [Bulldog] Squadron and flown from Sea Island, [Vancouver] to Patricia Bay. B. C. on 12 March 1944. Hurricane 5394 [original No. 133 Sqn. fighter] and 5413 [original No. 135 Sqn. fighter] were not serviceable and after repairs, will join No. 135 Squadron at Patricia Bay on 22 April 1944.

Thanks to this confusion of RCAF Hurricane fighters being switched [musical chairs] from No. 133 Squadron to No. 135 Squadron, the location of Hurricane 5389 has been lost by many historians. The Daily Diary of No. 13 Aeronautical Inspection [Coates Ltd. Vancouver] contains the facts on [Calgary] Hurricane 5389.

On 15 March 1944, No. 13 Aeronautical Inspection District, [Coates Ltd. Vancouver] notify No. 133 Squadron that Hurricane 5389 has been repaired and is ready for return to their squadron. P/O R. A. Gaskin [No. 133 Sqn.] picks up Hurricane 5389 at 10:10 hrs and flies it to No. 135 Squadron in Patricia Bay, arriving at 10:40 hrs. Hurricane 5389 will become the 17th ex-No. 133 Squadron fighter aircraft to be transferred to No. 135 [Bulldog] Squadron and for the second time in her career, 5389 will now fly with the ‘Bulldogs’ stationed at Patricia Bay, B. C.

Remember, Hurricane 5389 began her RCAF career training No. 135 pilots at Mossbank, Saskatchewan, from 8-26 July 1942, and now she will end her career with No. 135 [Bulldog] Squadron at Patricia Bay, B.C.

 

No. 133 Squadron will fly the Curtiss Kittyhawk from mid-March 1944 to July 1945.

The No. 135 Daily Diary reports on 10 May 1944 all pilots have soloed on the new Kittyhawk fighters, with the exception of two pilots on leave. The old ex-No. 133 Squadron Hurricane fighters are only flown for airframe and engine tests, preparing them for upcoming ferry flights.
Hurricane 5389 is last flown in No. 135 Squadron on 22 May 1944, pilot P/O Hodgins B. H., 15:15 to 16:15 hrs airframe and engine testing.

The next chapter in Hurricane 5389 is about to begin, and this involves the ferrying of thousands of war surplus aircraft across Canada.

In early December 1943, the Ottawa Supervisory Board began discussing the need to expand the BCATP in Canada, beyond the 31 March 1945 termination date which had been agreed upon in 1942. In early February 1944, Harold Balfour, British Under Secretary of State for Air and Air Marshal Sir Peter Drummond, RAF Air Member for Training arrived in Ottawa for meetings with Canadian Air Minister C. G. Power. On 16 February, Power officially explained to the Canadian House of Commons the need for a cutback in BCATP aircrew training. The reduction would be forty per cent and this involved the closing of 33 aircrew training schools out of a total of eight-two currently in operation.

At the request of the British government, Canada had agreed to close the 26 RAF schools first, and this began on 14 January 1944, when No. 33 [RAF] Elementary Flying Training School at Caron, Saskatchewan was closed. No. 41 [RAF] Service Flying Training School, Weyburn, Sask., was closed on 22 January 44, followed by No. 35 [RAF] S.F.T.S. North Battleford, Sask., on 25 February 1944, then No. 37 S.F.T.S. [RAF H.Q.] at Calgary, Alberta, 10 March 1944, and so on.
By the end of November 1944, all but two British RAF Schools in Canada had closed, including 13 schools located in No. 4 and No. 2 Air Training Commands in Western Canada. With the closing of these BCATP airfields, the Canadian Government began to plan for the end of hostilities and the future plans for these abandoned military airfields.

The first priority became the huge storage of surplus military equipment, including thousands of unwanted vehicles, supplies, and ex-wartime aircraft. To move this vast amount of military aircraft to the new storage holding units a new ferry squadron of RCAF pilots was required. On 1 March 1944, No. 170 [Ferry] Squadron was formed at Winnipeg, Manitoba, using RCAF personnel from the Western Detachment of No. 124 [Ferry] Squadron. This new squadron was assigned the task of ferrying over 5,000 training and operational aircraft in Western Canada, including the old Hurricane fighters used by No. 163, No. 135, and No. 133 Squadrons in the air defense of the West Coast.

On 26 May 1944, No. 170 [Ferry] Squadron pilots arrived at No. 135 [Bulldog] Squadron Patricia Bay, and ferry out the first two Hurricane aircraft, 5379 and 5425. Hurricane 5379 was an original No. 133 Squadron Hurricane fighter [16 June 1942] and 5425 was an original No. 135 Squadron fighter [18 June 1942]. Hurricane 5425 was ferried from Terrace, B. C. to Patricia Bay, B. C. on 3 October 1944.

On 27 May 44, No. 170 ferry pilots arrive at No. 135 Squadron and ferry out 5394 and 5413. Again, Hurricane 5394 is an original No. 133 Sqn. fighter [30 June 1942] and 5413 is an original No. 135 Sqn. fighter [23 July 1942]. Hurricane 5413 was ferried from Terrace, B. C. to Patricia Bay, on 31 March 1944.

On 1 June 1944, No. 135 [Bulldog] Squadron have 13 Hurricane fighters on strength but not in use. These 13 fighters are all ex-No. 133 Squadron aircraft which now includes [Calgary] Hurricane 5389. On 21 June 44, No. 170 [Ferry] squadron pilots begin the movement of Hurricanes from Patricia Bay, B. C. to Yakima and Spokane, Washington, USA, to Lethbridge detachment in southern Alberta. The last flight of a Hurricane by No. 135 Squadron took place at Patricia Bay on 25 June 1944, W02 Connor J. W. flew Hurricane 5377 from 16:30 to 17:00 hrs on engine test. This became the last Hurricane to leave No. 135 Squadron for Lethbridge that same date. The exact date that Hurricane 5389 was ferried to Lethbridge, Alberta, was never recorded in the Daily Diary of No. 135 Squadron or by No. 170 [Ferry] squadron, who only recorded the number of aircraft ferried on each date. On 24 June 44, No. 170 Sqn. ferried six Hurricanes from Patricia Bay, B. C. to Lethbridge Detachment, Alberta, and I believe that was the date Hurricane 5389 arrived at Lethbridge, Alberta. It appears the Hurricane fighters remained at Lethbridge for at least five months. No. 32 SFTS [RAF] Moose Jaw, Sask., closed on 17 October 1944, and No. 4 Training Command ceased to exist on 1 December 1944, replaced by No. 2 Air Command.

On 2 December 1944, the old RAF base became No. 2 Reserve Equipment Maintenance Unit, RCAF, Moose Jaw, Sask. The first “Forty-Two” storage aircraft arrived on 5 December 1944, and were placed into hangars. The very last RAF personnel are repatriated back to the United Kingdom on 2 January 1945. In the next few weeks No. 170 [Ferry] Squadron pilots will fly eleven Hurricane fighters for “Reserve Storage” at Moose Jaw, Sask.

One of them is 5389, today Calgary Flight Hangar Museum.

On 1 July 1944, the Canadian Government began to plan and create Surplus Equipment Holding Units at the abandoned WWII British Commonwealth Air Training Plan bases across Canada. No. 170 [Ferry] squadron which had been formed on 1 March 1944, were now responsible for the ferrying of all surplus RCAF aircraft to these vacant training bases. The RCAF had on strength 12,000 surplus aircraft, and many, like the Avro Ansons, were just set on fire and destroyed. Others, including the Hurricanes Mk. XIIs, were flown to an “Aircraft Holding Unit” where they were stored and maintained in flying condition, and could be flown out on short notice.
On 1 December 1944, a total reorganization and re-naming of the storage units took place. The name was changed to “RESERVE EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE UNITS” with a Headquarters and reserve satellite units located in the old training bases. On this date No. 4 and No. 2 [WWII] Training Commands ceased to exist and were replaced by No. 2 Air Command. On record cards, it appears that aircraft were moved, however only the Air Force Command names were changed.

No. 1 Reserve Equipment Maintenance Unit was established at Lethbridge, Alberta, on 15 December 1944, ex-No. 8 Bombing and Gunnery School. Under its command were three Satellite Units, No. 101 at Macleod, Alberta, No. 102 at Pearce, Alberta, and No. 103 at Vulcan, Alberta.

No. 2 Reserve E. M. U. was located at Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, on 2 December 1944, [Ex-RAF 32 SFTS] and under it were formed four Reserve Equipment Maintenance Satellite Units. No. 201 at Dafoe, Sask., No. 202 at Mossbank, Sask., No. 203 at Caron, Sask., No. 204 at Assiniboia, Sask., and No. 205 at Davidson, Saskatchewan.

At least eleven Hurricane fighters were held in storage at units under command of No. 2 Reserved Equipment Maintenance Unit, Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan. Their serial numbers appear in the Daily Diary of various units, when they were flown during some special event. They were just a group of old WWII fighters, which were outdated, ready for scrapping and of no further use to the Air Force. That all changed in early November 1944, and saved them from being scrapped. The confirmed Hurricane serial numbers are – 5377, 5389 [Calgary], 5393, 5418 [Wetaskiwin], 5414, 5424 [fake serial in England], 5447, 5584 [Ottawa], and 5588. The two unidentified Hurricane fighters are possibly – 5395 and 5478.

Beginning on 3 November 1944, and continuing until late June 1945, Japan launched between 9,000 and 10,000 incendiary balloons from their home islands. This history can be found on many websites and in numerous publications, which does not need to be repeated. The first line of defence for the RCAF became the West Coast of Canada, and this involved de Havilland F.B. Mk. 26 Mosquito fighters flown by No. 133 Squadron. The RCAF Mosquito aircraft were the only West Coast fighters to attain the speed and altitude to possibly intercept the Japanese balloons, travelling at 125 m.p.h. at over 35,000 feet.

In January 1945, a ‘secret’ second line of defence was being established by the RCAF and this involved old Hurricanes based in the Prairies, to track and possibly shoot-down the Fu-go weapons. In February 1945, Air Commodore B. F. Johnson, No. 2 Air Command, [Winnipeg] ordered a number of Hawker Hurricane fighters be removed from reserve storage at [No. 2 R.E.M.U.] Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, flown to No. 8 Repair Depot, Winnipeg, and made ready for flying Fu-go [Japanese Fire-Balloon] interception duties. Historians record the number of Hurricane fighters at five, however my research indicates six or possibly seven Hurricane aircraft were involved in these patrols for balloons. The proof is there, in Ottawa, if you take time to research it, page by page.

These Hurricane fighter serial numbers first appear recorded in the Daily Diary for No. 8 Repair Depot, Winnipeg, Manitoba, dated 2 February 1945. Hurricane 5418 arrives for a new Merlin 29 engine, from No. 2 Reserve Equipment Maintenance Unit, Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan. The fighter is stored in hangar #4, awaiting a new engine and other parts. A Merlin 29-233 engine is installed, and completed on 17 February 1945, the fighter is returned to storage at No. 2 R.E.H.U, by a pilot from 170 [Ferry] Squadron.

This rare fighter survives today in the world class aviation museum at Wetaskiwin, Alberta, today run by Alberta Culture and Community Spirit Heritage, with Byron Reynolds, AME, Honorary Curator of the Aviation Program.

Movement of Airframe and Aero Engines for month of February 1944, No. 8 Repair Depot, Winnipeg, Manitoba.

Hurricane 5418 is one of the first five fighters selected for duty in Saskatchewan. It is flown to No. 8 Repair Depot for minor engine repairs on 2 February 1945, and requires a new Merlin engine, which is installed by 17 February 1945. This Merlin 29 remains in the fighter today.
In 1986, I met Bryon Reynolds, at the then titled “Reynolds Museum Ltd” Wetaskiwin, Alberta. In 1998, I was invited, and gave two lectures on my subject of WWII aircraft nose art. On 27 December 2000, I received a phone call from Bryon, and he ask if I would paint the replica No. 135 “Bulldog” on the nose of Hurricane 5418. He knew my answer, but made it very clear, the nose art must be as close to the original as possible, and that including counting the aircraft rivets. Working with Byron was very professional and followed the same standard as that in the Smithsonian, Washington, D.C., USA.

This was the original pattern ‘nose art’ Bulldog approved by Bryon Reynolds. I spent six hours with Bryon and obtained as much history on Hurricane 5418 as I could. I was in for a big surprise, involving a rare part of unknown RCAF “Fu-go” nose art. This complete new history, with paintings, will appear next year [2018] on my Blog. Here is a small part of that story.

The Reynolds-Alberta Museum Hurricane 5418, ex-No. 135 [Bulldog] Squadron, was obtained by Stan Reynolds from a Saskatchewan farmer in November 1960.

Byron Reynolds – March 2001

When Hurricane 5418 arrived at No. 4 S.F.T.S. at Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, on 15 June 1945, it still contained the original image of the 135 Bulldog nose art. This was over-painted and a new nose art image appeared over the section where the Bulldog had been painted. This “Beautifull Balloon” nose art was still on the Hurricane engine cowling when it arrived at Wetaskiwin in November 1960. Bryon Reynolds copied the image and my replica painting is being shown for the first time.

The only WWII RCAF “Fu-go” nose art in the world. [Complete history coming in 2018]

Yes, that is the correct spelling for Hurricane 5418 nose art, painted in June 1945.

On 22 February 1945, Hurricane 5588 arrives at No. 8 Repair Depot for modification. This is completed on 9 April, and No. 170 [Ferry] squadron fly 5588 to No. 23 E.F.T.S. at Yorkton, Saskatchewan. The Daily Diary records one Hurricane taken on charge, no pilot name, no report of balloon sightings, and no scramble of the fighter. It appears there was total censorship by the C.O. at Yorkton, Sask.

On 12 March 1945, Hurricane, 5377, 5584, [Ottawa] and 5389 [Calgary] are flown in by No. 170 [Ferry] Sqdn. pilots for modification. When these three aircraft were placed into “Reserve Storage” [No. 2 R.E.M.U.] Moose Jaw, Sask., the radio, all armour plating, and the twelve .303 Cal. Browning machine guns were removed. The modification at Winnipeg involved replacing the radio and one .303 machine gun, for shooting at the Japanese balloons. Hurricane 5389, [Calgary] is completed on 14 March 1945, and flown to No. 23 EFTS at Yorkton, Saskatchewan, joining Hurricane 5588.

On 17 March 1945, Hurricane 5393 arrives for modification [below] and leaves the same date, flown by 170 [Ferry] Squadron to No. 4 SFTS at Saskatoon, Sask.

Hurricane 5393 completes patrols with no balloon sightings, or records appearing, until 8 June 1945, at 21:55 hrs.

Hurricane 5584 arrives at Winnipeg on 12 March 1945, and departs (No. 170 [Ferry] Sqn.) 19 March 1945, for No. 32 SFTS at Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan. [seen with records of Hurricane 5393, 17 March 1945] Hurricane 5377, which arrived with 5584 [Ottawa] and 5389 [Calgary] was never modified or assigned to any RCAF Station. It was prepared for being inhibited, 30 May 1945, and returned to No 3 S.E.H.U at Swift Current, Sask.

5377 remained at Swift Current, Sask., where it was sold on 13 July 1946.

Hurricane 5418 arrived at No. 8 Repair Depot on 7 May 1945, for modification of radio and machine gun.

Hurricane 5418, was taken on charge at No. 4 S.F.T.S at Saskatoon, Sask. 15 June 1945 and joins 5393 in patrols. Its first action is recorded on 21 June 1945, over Climax, Sask.

Thanks to these No. 8 Repair Depot records and base RCAF Daily Diary reports, the number and location of the RCAF Hurricane “Fu-go” fighters can be confirmed. There were five original Hurricanes, which No. 2 Air Command stationed at Saskatoon, [two] Yorkton, [two] and Moose Jaw, [one] Saskatchewan, beginning on 14 March 1945 and then removed, one by one, ending on 12 July 1945.

The Government assigned the Canadian Army as the chief agency to find, and most of all transport bomb disposal experts to the crash site. This same operation is going on today, as these 1944-1945 fire balloon bombs are still being discovered, the latest at Lumby, B.C., in October 2014.

The five RCAF Hurricane fighters were given the task of shooting down the balloons, then the RCAF would transport Army experts to the site, and last, the recovered material was flown by RCAF transport to Ottawa. The Canadian Government feared the balloons were transporting biological weapons of war, and total censorship was applied. This lack of records and no newspaper reporting has affected the true research and history to present day. The use of old RCAF Daily Diary for the period has released many hidden facts.

The peak Japanese balloon-launching months were February, March, and April 1945. Only four RCAF Hurricane fighters were on patrol during these three months. #5389 on 14 March 1945, #5393 on 17 March 1945, #5584 on 19 March 1945, and #5588 on 10 April 1945. Hurricane 5418 arrived on 15 June, near the end of the patrol period. A sixth [and last] Hurricane #5447, arrived at Yorkton, Sask., on 6 June 1945, but never taken on strength, [two Hurricanes appear in Daily Diary for end of June, 5588-5389] after twenty days, 5447 was flown to No. 3 S.E.H.U. at Swift Current, Saskatchewan, 26-27 June, and inhibited by 1 October 1945. Hurricane 5447, never appears in the Daily Diary and only two Hurricanes are ever shown taken on strength at Yorkton, Sask., for the month of June 1945. I believe 5447 was assigned to Moose Jaw, then during delivery the patrols were cancelled, and 5447 ended up at Yorkton, for twenty days and one photo was taken. [Photo on Vintage Wings site]

Hurricane 5447 was being ferried by P/O Ramsay of No. 124 [Ferry] Squadron, Rockcliffe, Ontario, on 4 September 1942. It had a category “A” crash one-half mile north-west of Porquis Junction, Ontario. It was salvaged and transported back to Fort William for a completed rebuild. Taken on strength RCAF No. 1 Training Command, it served with Home War Establishment at Nova Scotia from 2 October 1942 to 5 July 1943. It was sent to No. 3 Training Command for repairs and placed into storage 29 November 1944. On 4 June 1945, it was taken out of storage and flown to No. 2 Air Command at Yorkton, Saskatchewan.

There are no records of modification for Hurricane 5447 at No. 8 Repair Depot, Winnipeg, and it appears no machine gun was ever installed. No. 8 R.D. had a fleet of mobile panel trucks with mechanics who drove to RCAF Stations for minor aircraft repairs. On 24 June 1945, Winnipeg, No. 8 R.D. mobile party [five workers] did a special inspection [M.5] on Hurricane 5389 and 5447 at No. 23 E.F.T.S., Yorkton, Sask. This proves the Hurricane was at the station, but never shows up in any other records. I believe this was to prepare the two fighters for storage [inhibited], and they were next flown to No. 3 Surplus Equipment Holding Unit at Swift Current, Saskatchewan, between 12 and 18 July. No. 5447 was recorded ready for disposal on 12 July 1945, inhibited in October, with 312:40 hrs airframe flying time. Sold on 28 August 1946.

On 28 August 1946, #5447 was sold to a Regina farmer and years later re-sold to Harry Whereatt of Assiniboia, Sask. in 1988. The aircraft came with nose art name “Star Dust” and large yellow 71 painted on the original engine cowling. It was slowly being restored to flying condition by Harry until he became ill [stroke] and sold it to Vintage Wings of Canada, 23 August 2006. It is still under restoration at V.W. in Ottawa, and will appear as the famous fighter of Calgary’s Willie McKnight. Vintage Wings have many highly qualified research experts, and I’m sure the full history of #5447 will appear on their website. I am interested to see if my amateur research is at all close.

Swift Current, Saskatchewan

No. 39 Service Flying Training School. Swift Current, Saskatchewan, was a British R.A.F. school, one of 26 that operated in Canada during WWII. The last class of trainees, Course #63, began on 29 November 1943 and 55 graduated on 24 March 1944. That is the same date the British school was disbanded. On 1 April 44, a new school re-opened by the RCAF as No. 402 Aircraft Holding Unit. It was unique in RCAF history, as it was never fully established when it was disbanded at 23:59 hrs, 21 May 1944. It had a staff of six officers, 51 airmen and 42 civilians, plus temporary personnel of 103. It was formed to store and maintain RCAF surplus aircraft in flying condition, then the RCAF senior command began to restructure aircraft holding units, and it became RCAF Station, Swift Current, Saskatchewan.

On 1 May 1945, RCAF Swift Current re-opened as No. 3 Surplus Equipment Holding Unit, Swift Current. By the end of the month they had 432 aircraft in storage, including two Hurricane Mk. XII fighters. The Daily Diary for May 1945, contains only one Hurricane serial number, #5414 which had been on a Victory Loan Drive from 11 April 1945. This is an ex-135 [Bulldog] fighter which records her tire being repaired on 4 August 1945, at No. 3 S.E.H.U. 5414 was inhibited in October 1945, and sold on 20 August 1946.

From early June to 18 July 1945, eight Hurricane fighters arrive for storage and the following day [19] one more Hurricane arrives. That brings the total to 11 Hurricanes on strength. This is recorded in the Daily Diary for 31 July 1945, and they also have 205 Avro Anson trainers in storage. A good number of these will be set on fire and destroyed.

Five of these Hurricane Mk. XII fighters were ex- “Fu-go” Japanese Balloon fighters, which were taken on charge at Yorkton, Moose Jaw, and Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. The following history was found in a number of RCAF Daily Diary records, giving a much clearer picture of what took place in after June 1945.
1. #5389 [ex-133 Sqn.] returned 26 June 1945, Inhibited 15 November 1945. Sold 20 August 1946.
2. #5393 [ex-133 Sqn.] returned 18 July 1945. Sold 20 August 1946.
3. #5418 [ex-135 Sqn.] returned 18 July 1945, flown to Air show at Winnipeg, 4 August, and returned 22 August 1945. Inhibited in October 1945. Sold 20 August 1946.
4. #5447 (No. 170 [Ferry] Sqn.) arrived 26-27 June 1945. Inhibited in October. Sold 28 August 1946.
5. #5584 [ex-163- 135] [at the Canadian Aviation and Space Museum, in Ottawa, today] arrived 22 August 1945, picked up by F/O Saidler, 13 June 1946, flew in Winnipeg airshow 12-13th July and then Edmonton 26 July 46. F/L Anderson was the Edmonton pilot, then the Hurricane had engine problems and could not fly. 28 July 1946, flown to Winnipeg. Never sold, saved for display and today in Ottawa, still owned by Canadian Government. Flown only 196:55 hrs.

6. #5588 [ex-163 Sqn.] arrived early June 1945. Picked up by F/O Dibnah R.H. at Swift Current, on 13 June 1946, and flown in Airshow at Winnipeg, by F/O Saidler D. 12-13 July 46. Flown in Edmonton Airshow by F/L Anderson on 26 July 65. Suffered a flat tire at Suffield, Alberta, 28 July 46. Inhibited at unknown location, and not sold until 22 October 1953.

The mystery Hurricane #5424. [Possibly flew in Manitoba]

This Hurricane 5424, was an original No. 135 [Bulldog] Squadron fighter which was stored at No. 18 Staging Unit, Terrace, B.C. on 12 March 1944. The ferrying of 15 Bulldog stored Hurricanes from Terrace to Patricia Bay, B.C. began on 31 March 44, when No. 170 [Ferry] squadron pilots departed with #5413 and #5414. They completed a second record flight for the RCAF, when they returned using the little known “Internal British Columbia Staging Route” with airfields at RCAF Vanderhoof, RCAF Quesnel, RCAF Williams Lake and the most important RCAF Dog Creek.

When No. 135 Squadron flew to join the Americans in their Alaskan Command [RCAF “Y” Wing, Annette, Alaska] on 16 August 1943, they were the first RCAF squadron to fly this interior route, which was still under construction. Now they became the first to return to Patricia Bay, using the same interior route. On 7 September 1944, Lodestar 555 delivered six 170 ferry pilots to Terrace, B.C. at 15:30 hrs. They were assigned Hurricane #5407, #5411, #5418, #5421, #5424 [above] and #5589, departing Terrace, B.C. at 18:00 hrs. The remote RCAF Station Dog Creek had just been installed with night time landing lights, due to the fact it was a most important 24-hour fueling point. [In 1944-1945, this RCAF Station saved the lives of many Canadian and American fuel-starved aircraft] Today it is gone from sight and totally forgotten. Just before midnight, 7 Sept. 1944, the six Hurricane aircraft arrived for fuel, and became the first night-time landing and take-off at RCAF Station Dog Creek. Hurricane 5424 was now flown to Patricia Bay, and next ferried back to Lethbridge, Alberta, by No. 170 Squadron, possibly in November 1944. Possibly placed into storage at No. 2 Reserve Equipment Maintenance Unit, Moose Jaw, Sask., on 5 December 1945. Forty-two aircraft arrived on that date. I cannot find any serial record in any RCAF unit Daily Diary.

No. 3 Bombing and Gunnery School at MacDonald, Manitoba, did not close until 17 February 1945. On 13 September 1944, they had on charge two Hawker Hurricane fighters and received three more on that date, total now five. No serial numbers are listed.

On the 19 September 1945, Hurricane 5424 arrives at No. 8 Repair Depot, Winnipeg, for minor repairs. It is next flown to No. 3 Bombing and Gunnery School, Macdonald, Manitoba, for storage.

Eight months later, spring of 1946, Hurricane #5424 is found in storage at No. 3 S.E.H.U. at Swift Current, Saskatchewan, where it is sold on 15 August 1946. It was later obtained by Lynn Garrison and moved to Calgary, along with Hurricane 5389. 5424 is leased, without any approval by owner Lynn Garrison, to a man in Saskatchewan, where it is secretly sold to a millionaire in U.K. It arrives in England, then it is reported ‘stolen’ to Calgary Police, and nothing can be done. It sits for five years in U.K. with no serial number, then it is registered with a false number. It is sold, and then appears with a new serial number, again false, and now the owners are attempting to flog it to anyone with over two million bucks to thrown away on a false fighter, with a false history. A pure crime of Canadian and British greed, caused by money, which can only be solved by more money. Buy it, return it to Canada, and paint it correctly as 5424.

Hurricane 5424 is the ninth confirmed WWII Canadian Mk. XII Hurricane, out of a total of eleven, which were in storage at No. 3 S.E.H.U. at Swift Current, Saskatchewan, June 1945 to July-August 1946. For many years, it has been rumored this Hurricane flew patrols against the Japanese Fu-go Balloons, however this history is still a mystery. Rivers, Manitoba, had one Spitfire and one Mosquito for tracking balloons drifting that far East.

Thanks to the Japanese Fu-go Balloons, the five [original] Hurricanes assigned to shoot them down, remained protected and stored in Western Canada. That protected them from being scrapped, and three [5389, 5418 and 5447] were purchased by Saskatchewan farmers, preserving our RCAF past, and now they are found in Calgary, Wetaskiwin, and [Vintage Wings of Canada] Ottawa.

The fourth Hurricane 5584 can be found in the Canadian Aviation and Space Museum in Ottawa, sitting beside our Lancaster Mk. X which has been painted incorrectly for the past fifty years.

Collection Pierre Lagacé 2015

Collection Pierre Lagacé 2015

Collection Pierre Lagacé 2015

Collection Pierre Lagacé 2015

Such a beautiful Canadian built Mk. XII Hurricane fighter, with almost no historical information. It flew with No. 163 Squadron, and was placed into “Reserve Storage” a number of times, available for disposal 12 July 1945. On 18 April 1946, retained by RCAF for purpose of display. To the average visitor of “our” Canadian Aviation and Space Museum, this is not a very important or interesting WWII fighter aircraft. But wait, it is most important, provided it receives the correct historical information, and they remove the British spinner from the nose.

The Ottawa Hurricane [today] is displayed with a “Canadian” manufactured spinner, which the average person has no idea about. So, visitors just think it is “British”, and that’s the point I am attempting to make.

Here is a photo which shows a first Canadian spinner, appearing in No. 133 Squadron at Tofino, B.C., March 1944.

Collection Gordon Hill

Only a few Hurricanes received this spinner, as the aircraft was obsolete by 1944, and being replaced by the Kittyhawks. The photo was taken at Tofino, B.C. before the move to Sea Island, Vancouver, on 10 March 1944. This was Hurricane #5377 [“S”] of S/L W.C. Connell, the C.O., and possibly the only one to received this Canadian spinner.

No. 163 [Army Co-operation] Squadron was formed at Sea Island, [Vancouver] B.C. on 1 March 1943. They flew obsolete Bristol Bolingbroke Mk. IV aircraft on West Coast photographic assignments, and the North American Harvard Mk. II, in close support of Army troops in ground training exercises at Camp Wainwright, Alberta. In late June 1943, the squadron was converted to fly the Hurricane Mk. XII fighter and the first two arrived on 5 July 1943. Hurricane #5584 was not only the first to arrive, it became the very first to fly on 11 July 1943, F/L Wilson. 5584 will complete 22 patrols from Sea Island, until end of July 1943, and continue patrols until 13 November 1943.

No. 163 is re-designated a Fighter Squadron on 14 October 1943, and ordered to re-equip with the modern Curtiss Kittyhawk aircraft on 28 November 1943. The last flight of 5584 is on 13 November 1943, F/Sgt. Senecal. By 19 November, the complete squadron has converted to Kittyhawk fighters. Hurricane 5584, 5586 and 5590 are now flown from Sea Island to No. 133 Squadron at Tofino, B.C., on 4 December 1943, and placed into Command Reserve. The squadron is over-strength with fighters and they remain in reserve, never flown, until 4 August 1944. Hurricane 5584 is now returned to No. 2 Training Command, Winnipeg, Manitoba, and placed into storage at an “Aircraft Holding Unit” possibly No. 401 at Swift Current, Sask.

On 1 December 1944, No. 2 Training Command becomes No. 2 Air Command, and 5584 remains in storage. In early March 1945, #5584, #5377, and 5389, are removed from storage and flown to No. 8 Repair Depot, Winnipeg, Manitoba, arriving 12 March 1945. Modification with radio and one 303 Browning machine gun is completed on Hurricane 5584 and 5389, 19 March 1945. They are now flown by No. 170 [Ferry] Squadron pilots to assigned Japanese Fu-go patrol units, and 5389 is assigned Yorkton, Saskatchewan.

On 15 March 1945, F/O W.A. Doyle, #J22160 arrives from Winnipeg, assigned No. 2 R.E.M.U. at Moose Jaw, Sask., a new Hurricane “Fu-go” fighter pilot. Hurricane 5584 arrives on 20 March 1945, and is flown to Rivers, Manitoba, by pilot Doyle on 29 March, [reason unknown] returning to Moose Jaw on 2 April 1945. RCAF Station Rivers Manitoba, had on strength one Spitfire and one Mosquito for tracking Japanese Balloons, and 5584 was possibly involved in training with these fighters.

Hurricane 5584 is air tested on 27 May by pilot Doyle. No Balloons sighted.

Hurricane 5584 is scrambled at 16:00 hrs as a “Crabapple” is sighted 5 miles south of climax, Saskatchewan. This is the first use of the RCAF code word for Japanese Balloons, “CRABAPPLE.”

On 22 August 1945, F/O Hanneson G. J47498 returns Hurricane 5584 to No. 3 S.E.H.U., RCAF, Swift Current, Sask. The fighter is inhibited in November and remains in hangar storage until June 1946.

On 8 December 1945, the RCAF form No. 2 Air Command [H.Q. “K” Composite Flight] at Winnipeg, Manitoba. Assigned aircraft are used for communication, target towing, practice flying, including Canadian “Airshow” flying. On 13 June 1946, F/L Dibnah R.H. and F/O Saidler D. arrive at No. 3 S.E.H.U. Swift Current where they pick up Hurricane 5588 and 5584, flying both back to Winnipeg. On 12-13 July, the two Hurricanes appear in a Winnipeg airshow. On 29 July, both 5588 and 5584 are test flown and head off for an airshow in Edmonton, Alberta. The airshow is held on 26 July 1946, and during an engine run-up, pilot F/O Saidler encounters problems and cannot take part in the airshow. Hurricane 5584 is returned to No 8 Repair Depot on 28 July 1946, for repairs and placed into stored reserve in Manitoba.

In 1960, the new National Aeronautical Museum in Ottawa begins looking for RCAF aircraft to preserve. Hurricane 5584 is discovered in Mountain View, Ontario, where it will soon be scrapped. It is saved and flown to RCAF Uplands, Ottawa, in August 1962, and repainted for public display. This is the most original preserved Canadian built Hurricane Mk. XII in the world, and has always remained property of the taxpayer [Government] of Canada. On 6 February 1964, it went on public display, where it remains today, wearing a British nose spinner.

Today, the Canadian War Museum, Ottawa, have on display an original “Crabapple” Japanese Fu-go bottom [bomb-sand bag] section, without Balloon. Now, if they [Ottawa] could just get this WWII rare artifact together with the Canadian built Hurricane Mk. XII that hunted “Crabapples”, Wow!

Left is part of a “crabapple” recovered at Provost, Alberta, 7 February 1945, and [right] the one recovered at Minton, Saskatchewan, 12 January 1945, and now in the Canadian War Museum Ottawa.

Hurricane 5584 is powered by a Rolls-Royce Merlin engine. Most visitors to the museum take for granted, it was the best engine, and it was British made. Not true, it was the best, but produced in the United States of America!

In 1939, the Canadian Government was in such a rush to support Britain, it signed a contract to produce training aircraft, and in their eagerness forgot about fighter aircraft and protection of Canada. On 9 March 1941, the Canadian Chief of the Air Staff submitted a proposal for the increased of Hurricane fighters for the Defence of Canada, in the Home War Establishment. Canada had no aero-engine industry and they suddenly realized, the American and British produced all front-line combat aircraft engines, and the real shocker was they also controlled the allocation of engines needed for the airframes built in Canada. In brief, there were chronic shortages of aircraft, aero-engines, and spare parts for the war in Europe 1940-41. Up until 7 December 1941, the British and Americans together opposed the allocation of any Canadian built fighters, with American engines, for the protection of Canada. The events in Washington, D.C., after the attack on Pearl Harbor, changed both the British and American thinking, as fighters were now needed for the protected of the West Coast of both Canada and United States.

In September 1940, the American Packard Motor Company, Detroit, Michigan, signed a multi-million-dollar contract to build the British Rolls-Royce Merlin engine for both the American and British Governments. The first American Packard original Merlin 28 was built with the designation V-1650-1 and shown to the American public on 2 August 1941. Canadian Car and Foundry Co. Ltd. also signed a contract with the British Ministry of Aircraft Production for the manufacture of Canadian Hawker Hurricanes for the R.A.F. The first Canadian built Hurricane began flying trials in January 1940, and were delivered to England in the following month. All this history can be found on many websites.

By October 1941, the Packard-built Merlin engines were in full production at Detroit, [Many on the production line were young American ladies] and the second production engine became the Merlin 29. These new engines were shipped from Detroit, to the Can. Car and Foundry plant at Fort William, Ontario, [Now-Thunder Bay] and installed in the Hurricane Mk. XII fighters. The Merlin 29 was a 1,300 h.p. engine manufactured with splined airscrew shaft, fitted with an American built Nash-Kelvinator Hamilton Standard propeller. This American propeller could not accommodate the British made Hurricane spinners, and thus ‘our’ fighters gained a special “Canadian” built-in trademark. They flew without any spinners.

Pilot F/O Gordon Hill began his Hurricane training at No. 1 Operational Training Unit, Bagotville, Quebec, Course #8, on 30 January 1943. His course was delayed by a two-day snow fall, which can be seen in this image, taken around 3 February 1943. This is what Hurricane “Y” looked like, and how Hurricane 5584 should be displayed in Ottawa. England is full of ‘their’ Hurricane fighters, with British spinners. 5584 is the best original Canadian built Hurricane fighter, but to many, a spinner confuses it with a British production aircraft. The original “Crabapple” Hurricane Mk. XII, 5418, in Reynolds Alberta Museum, is displayed correctly, with an American Packard-Rolls-Royce engine displayed beside it.


Canadian Army reports dated 28 March 1945, claim a Japanese Balloon was intercepted and shot down at Strathmore, Alberta. No verified records can be found in any RCAF unit of Station Daily Diary. Two Mitchell B-25 bombers were stationed at Suffield, Alberta, again no record can be found. Tight press censorship was applied to all newspapers, but at times the government allowed some “fake” news to leak out. On 28 May 1945, a Japanese Balloon landed intact at High River, Alberta, just south of Calgary. A reporter for the Calgary Albertan [Calgary Sun today] obtained these photos, but he could not publish until 23 June 1945, and only without revealing location, date, or time.

Fu-Go Balloons in Canada

Released in Japan, during normal winter wind conditions, the Japanese Fire Balloons took approximately 70 hours to reach the west coast of Canada. As would be expected, most balloons with positive identification landed in British Columbia, with 39 found, the last in October 2014. Once they crossed the Rocky Mountains, Alberta discovered 17, then 9 in Saskatchewan, and 5 in Manitoba. It is estimated that 1,000 balloons reached North America and combined, Canadian and American authorities only found, [or reported] 285. That means around 600 are still out there someplace.

This is a list of the positive known balloons [or parts] that were found in Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba, from 1 January 1945 to 15 June 45. March was clearly the month most balloons appeared over the Prairies, and when four Hurricane fighter were flying patrols.
1 January 1945 Stony Rapids, Sask.
12 January 1945 Minton, Sask.
7 February 1945 Provost, Alberta.
9 February 1945 Moose Jaw, Sask.
22 February 1945 Manyberries [Lethbridge] Alberta.
22 February 1945 Porcupine Plains, Sask.
10 March 1945 Nelson House, Manitoba.
11 March 1945 Edson, Alberta.
12 March 1945 Oxford House, Manitoba.
13 March 1945 Baril Lake, Alberta.
14 March 1945 Hay Lake, Alberta.
19 March 1945 Marie Lake, Manitoba.
20 March 1945 Fort Chipewyn, Alberta.
20 March 1945 William Lake, Manitoba.
20 March 1945 Olds, Alberta.
20 March 1945 Wimborne, Alberta.
21 March 1945 Delburne, Alberta.
21 March 1945 Camsell Portage, Sask.
23 March 1945 Athabasca, Alberta.
23 March 1945 Delburne, Alberta.
24 March 1945 Medicine Hat, Alberta.
28 March 1945 Strathmore, Alberta.
29 March 1945 Medicine Hat, Alberta.
30 March 1945 Consul, Sask.
30 March 1945 Waterton Lake, Manitoba.
31 March 1945 Ituna, Sask.
1 April 1945 Yorkton, Sask.
5 May 1945 Stettler, Alberta.
15 May 1945 Kelvington, Sask.
23 May 1945 Milo, Alberta.
28 May 1945 High River, Alberta. Reported in newspaper 23 June 1945.
15 June 1945 Whitecourt, Alberta.

Alberta had two aircraft stationed at RCAF Detachment, Suffield, Alberta. Very little has been recorded or researched on their operation. One B-25 Mitchell bomber KJ641, was on strength in February 1945, and reported in articles, as used to track Japanese Balloons. It appears in the Daily Dairy with a number of different pilots, conducting what they called ‘Local 104” or “Local 101” and other numbers. A Boston Bomber BE410 was also used for camera work, and that’s about all I can make out.

On 7 February 1945, a single Mosquito fighter arrived at 17:00 hrs, with a No. 170 ferry pilot and navigator. They returned to No. 1 R.E.H.U. at Lethbridge, Alberta. The Mosquito was flown by different crews and did special tests called F.E. 291 or F.E. 293, and other code numbers. The tests were conducted at 30,000 feet and recorded on film by the Boston Bomber. The Mosquito remained on strength until 4 April 1945, and then left for Regina, Sask. I believe this was all top secret, involving the Japanese Balloons, during the same time period 22 Balloons were found in the three Prairies provinces. Canadian Government officials were very concerned the balloons were being used to carry a biological war to Canada.

About the Mosquito

I have attached here the RCAF Suffield Daily Diary 7 Feb, and end of month 28 Feb. 45. I believe this RCAF Mosquito worked with the five Hurricanes in Saskatchewan, but I have no further proof.

I think releasing this information is a good time and place.

The known balloons to land in Canada up until 28 August 1945, was 88, which includes N.W.T, and Yukon. Historians report the Japanese stopped releasing balloons in early April 1945, and that is not correct. The High River balloon arrived on 28 May 45, and it was intact, after releasing incendiary bombs and anti-personnel bomb, possibly over the Rocky Mountains of Alberta. The self-destruct bomb mechanism failed to work, and the bomb came down in a farmers field, bouncing along until it hit a fence. This Japanese Fu-Go balloon was launched around 23-24 May, then 70-80 hours later was recovered and flown to Ottawa. One more balloon would be found in Alberta in June 45, and two in Yukon. In July 45, six balloons were found in B.C. and one in Yukon. In August 45, three balloons were found in B.C.

Born and raised on a farm in Southern Alberta, I fully understand the winds that seem to always blow in Alberta. That is the reason many balloons were blown north from United Sates and landed in southern Alberta and Saskatchewan. Right in the middle of this was the location of RCAF Detachment, Suffield, Alberta, today a British Army [restricted] training area. The truth may never be fully released.


The last original “Crabapple” Hurricane fighter 5389

The last original “Crabapple” Hurricane fighter 5389, has been stored outside, lost, forgotten, and almost given away to another millionaire in England. This fighter is truly a survivor, in more ways than I could ever describe.

Hurricane 5389, [in Calgary today] was taken out of No. 2 Reserve Equipment Maintenance Unit, RCAF, Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, in March 1945. It was flown to No. 8 Repair Depot, at Winnipeg, Manitoba, 12 March 1945, along with #5377 and #5584. [in Ottawa today] The modification of radio and one .303 Browning machine gun was completed on 14 March, and No. 170 [Ferry] Squadron flew 5389 to No. 23 E.F.T.S. at Yorkton, Saskatchewan, where it is taken on strength, Daily Diary, [15 March 1945]. No. 23 EFTS did not close until 15 September 1945, and records of all activities appear in Daily Diary, however there is no record of Hurricane pilot, any scramble or sightings of Japanese Balloon, just one Hurricane taken on strength. A second Hurricane 5588 arrived on 10 April 1945, and again is only shown taken on charge. On 24 June 1945, a mobile repair party of five, from No. 8 Repair Depot, complete an M.5 inspection of Hurricane 5389 at Yorkton, Sask. The machine gun is removed and No. 170 [Ferry] squadron fly the fighter back to storage at No. 3 S.E.H.U. Swift Current, Sask. The Daily Diary at Swift Current record shows Hurricane 5389 is inhibited in a hangar on 15 November 1946. In the spring of 1946, the Hurricane is ready for disposal, taken off strength by RCAF and sold by War Assets Corporation on 20 August 1946. The new owner is Mr. Robert R. Hamilton, 3915 Montague St. Regina, Saskatchewan. The Hurricane is placed on a farm outside Regina and forgotten.

During his flying days with No. 403 Squadron in Calgary, Lynn Garrison befriended a young 15-year-old who wanted to be a fighter pilot, Joe E. McGoldrick. Lynn would take him to the airport and left him sit in the Mustangs and Harvard aircraft. When he was old enough, Joe joined the RCAF, but they made him a navigator, so he dropped out, as he wanted to be a pilot. He returned to Calgary and began a concerted effort to become a pilot. He obtained his licence, spent many hours as a flight instructor and was finally accepted by Pacific Western Airlines. During the early days Garrison was forming the Alberta Aviation Museum, Joe was a student pilot in training for navigator, at RCAF Station Winnipeg. On weekends Joe would drive around and locate WWII aircraft. He learned that Hurricane 5389 was for sale and Calgary mechanic Ed Fleming purchased 5389 and 5424 from the farmer owners in Regina, Saskatchewan. Later in 1962, Lynn Garrison was looking for Hurricane fighters and Ed was doing a rebuild of a WWII P-51 Mustang. Lynn Garrison traded a set of Mustang wings, one Packard Merlin 29 engine and a Mustang propeller to Ed Fleming for the two Hurricane fighters, 5424 and 5389. The two Hurricanes were transported to Calgary courtesy of Wolton Lumber Company, and placed in the Shell Oil Pipeline storage yard on Edmonton Trail, Calgary. If you are still interested, more details can be found on the website of The Calgary Mosquito Society.

On 21 December 2011, the City of Calgary awards the restoration of “Crabapple” Hurricane fighter 5389 to the Calgary Mosquito Society. The fighter is moved to Historic Aviation Services in Wetaskiwin on 27 October 2012, for restoration to taxi condition. The restoration is expected to be completed a year from now, summer 2018. Today [September 2017] only three RCAF original “Crabapple” Hurricane fighters survive, and two are back together at Wetaskiwin, Alberta.

Next Chapter – The WWII pilot who flew Hurricane 5389, 94-year-old F/O Gordon Hill, from Calgary, Alberta.

“Crabapple” Fighter, Hurricane Mk. XII, serial #814, RCAF 5389

Updated 22 July 2021 with the PDF version below.

Crabapple Fighter Hurricane Mk#5389.-1

Exclusive research done by Clarence Simonsen about the little History of “Crabapple” Fighter, Hurricane Mk. XII, serial #814, RCAF 5389


“Crabapple” Fighter, Hurricane Mk. XII, serial #814, RCAF 5389

By Clarence Simonsen

RCAF Hurricane 5389 was constructed by the Canadian Car and Foundry factory in Fort William, Ontario, on the western tip of Lake Superior in May 1942.

The first production Hurricane Mk. XII aircraft serial RCAF 5376 was retained at the factory in Fort William for testing and was not assigned to the RCAF until taken on strength 6 August 1943. The next 25 production new Hurricane Mk. XII [serial 5377 to 5401] aircraft were flown directly by No. 124 ferry pilots to No. 4 Training Command at Calgary, Alberta, or their Ferry Detachment at Lethbridge, Alberta, then later assigned to No. 133 [Falcon] Squadron which was formed at Lethbridge, Alberta, on 3 June 1942.

The first Air Force Ferry Squadron was formed at Air Force Headquarters, RCAF Station, Rockcliffe, [Ottawa] Ontario, on 24 December 1941, Organization Order 173, Flight Lieutenant H. O. Madden [C1407] was approved as the first Ferry Squadron Commander. On 14 February 1942, they were officially numbered No. 124 [Ferry] Squadron, formed for the purpose of inter-command ferrying of all RCAF aircraft across Canada, with detachments located in Eastern Division at Moncton, New Brunswick, Montreal, Quebec, Megantic, Quebec, Malton, [Toronto] Ontario, North Bay, Ontario, Kapuskasing, Ontario, and Western Division at Armstrong, Ontario, Regina, Saskatchewan, Lethbridge, Alberta, Cranbrook, B.C. and Penticton, B.C. The Daily Diary records the first ferry aircraft were Oxford AT533 and AS6596 delivered to R.A.F. Station Penhold, Alberta, on 4 January 1942, before they were officially numbered 124 [Ferry] Squadron.

The month of June 1942, became a busy period for No. 124 [Ferry] Squadron as new Canadian built Hawker Hurricane Mk. XII aircraft were being delivered from the factory in Fort William to new formed units in Eastern and Western Canada. The Daily Diary records the number of aircraft delivered but no aircraft individual serial number is recorded. The No. 124 squadron ferry pilot who delivered Hurricane 5389 is not known, however this fighter was taken on charge by RCAF on 23 June 1942, and assigned to No. 133 [F] Squadron in the next few days.

Hurricane aircraft serial 5377 to 5382 were taken on charge by the RCAF 16 January 1942, and later in June delivered by 124 [Ferry] Squadron to No. 133 at Lethbridge, AB, which is recorded in the Daily Diary of squadron operations. Between 24 June and 30 June 1942, No. 124 Squadron will ferry 53 aircraft to allotted units and a large percentage are new Hurricane fighters, including 5389.

This RCAF photo [PL12324] which was a posed image taken at No. 133 Squadron at Lethbridge, Alberta, records two new Hurricane aircraft #5383 without code letter and #5398 [March of Dimes] with code “L” painted on fuselage. This was most likely taken around the end of July 1942, when the squadron was busy with training and painting code letters on their new Hurricane fighters.

The No. 133 Daily Diary records the following for 17 July 1942 – Hurricane “March of Dimes” aircraft No. 5398, together with No. 5395 arrived at his unit at 19:00 hrs from Fort William, Ontario.

Hurricane # 5398 was first ferried to Calgary from Fort William on 15 July 1942 and was officially taken on charge by the RCAF. This was a special presentation aircraft with the “March of Dimes” painted on both sides of the nose panel in white lettering.

Photo taken at No. 4 Training Command Headquarters, Calgary, Alberta, 15 July 1942.

No. 133 Squadron Commanding Officer received the new presentation fighter at Lethbridge, Alberta, 17 July 1942, newspaper clipping on left. The nose lettering reads – ‘CONTRIBUTIONS TO CANADA “MARCH OF DIMES” HELPED TO PURCHASE THE AEROPLANE.’

On 4 February 1943, No. 133 [Falcon] Squadron were based at Boundary Bay. B.C., conducting normal patrols and training exercises. P/O Grover Stewart Sargent, J11976, was assigned a night time map reading exercise [flying Hurricane 5398, “L”] to the training area at Pender Island, then west to Patricia Bay, fuel, and return to base at Boundary Bay. He never arrived at Patricia Bay and the next morning his body was recovered near Pender Island. The crash site has never been found, and the cause is unknown. The body of Pilot Officer Sargent, age 20 years, was returned to Quebec, where he was buried in Lake View Cemetery, Pointe-Claire, Quebec.

All Hurricane fighters were painted at Fort William in R.A.F. colors for period June 1940 to June 1942.

Aircraft code letters were painted on at assigned RCAF units as shown above.

This records the correct 1942 roundel markings on the Canadian Hurricane fighters that were delivered from Fort William to RCAF Home War Establishment units. Upper roundel was type “B” red and blue, under wing was type “A. II” and fuselage was type A. I, red, white, blue and matt yellow.

Hurricane RCAF 5389 was the thirteenth fighter delivered to the RCAF and taken on charge 23 June 1942 at Calgary, Alberta, delivered to Lethbridge two days later. The fighter was painted with the code letter “M” and began general pilot training on 1 July 42, where Hurricane flying time was recorded at 23:15 hrs. On 2 July 42, Wing Commander Gray arrived by air at 11:00 hrs to arrange the allotment of three No. 133 Hurricane aircraft for pilot training at No. 135 Squadron at Mossbank, Saskatchewan. On 8 July 42, RCAF Hurricane 5385, 5386 and 5389 were transferred to No. 135 [Bulldog] Squadron at Mossbank, Saskatchewan for pilot training. They arrived at Mossbank the next day, recorded in Diary. Pilots were S/L Brookes, P/O Sargent, [killed 4 February 1943, March of Dimes] and F/Sgt. Shavalier.

[It is recorded in the No. 135 [Bulldog] Squadron Daily Diary that all pilots had been fully trained and soloed in the Hurricane fighter aircraft by 17 July 1942. It should also be recorded that Hurricane 5389 trained many of the first RCAF fighter pilots in No. 135 ‘Bulldog’ Squadron].
It is most likely Hurricane 5389 received a new 135 squadron code letter, and possibly even the nose art of the 135 “Bulldog” appeared on her engine covering for a few weeks.

No. 135 pilot George Lawson in front of Hurricane “U”, at Mossbank, Sask., 13 July 1942, which could possibly be one of the loaned fighters, 5386, 5385 or [Calgary] 5389, with Bulldog nose art.

On 26 July 1942, Hurricane 5385 and 5389 are returned to No. 133 Squadron from Mossbank, Sask. RCAF Hurricane 5386 returns to Lethbridge on 31 July 42.

27 July 1942, Mr. E. J. Sousby, General Manager of Canadian Car and Foundry Co. arrives for a special meeting to discuss the new Hurricane aircraft. The following day all Hurricane Mk. XII aircraft are being tested by the flying instructors for a detailed report on their general condition, which will be sent to the Fort William factory.

On 31 July 1942, Officer Commanding No. 133 Squadron, S/Leader W. T. Brooks, reports 24 Hurricane and 6 Harvard aircraft on strength, only 9 Hurricane fighters are serviceable. 28 August 1942, at 15:20 hrs. Hurricane 5380 makes a crash landing on aerodrome and is a total loss. F/Sgt. Pilot E. B. Monypenny R108600 is suspended from further flying. This is the first Hurricane lost and not taken off charge until 11 February 1943. On 12 May 1943, F/Sgt. Monypenny lost control of Hurricane 5383 at 1,500 ft over base, crashed and was killed.

Pilot Eric Burk Monypenny

On 31 August 1942, No. 133 Squadron has 13 officers and 199 airmen on strength, 23 Hurricane aircraft and 6 Harvard trainers. Total Hurricane flying training time for the month is 30:55 hrs day and 7:30 hrs night. 15 September 1942, Captain D. M. Howard, Chief Test Pilot, Canadian Boeing Aircraft, Co. arrives to test all of the squadron Hurricane aircraft.

23 September 1942, S/L Brooks advises the Squadron they will be moving to Boundary Bay, B. C. in October. The advance party depart by rail for Boundary Bay on 30 September 1942. At 17:00 hrs that same day, [30 Sept.] No. 135 squadron [Bulldogs] arrive for fuel with 19 Hurricane aircraft on their southern route to Sea Island, [Vancouver] B.C. The “Bulldogs” will become the first RCAF Fighter Squadron to fly from Lethbridge, Alberta, to Spokane, Washington, Yakima, Washington, and then to Sea Island, [Vancouver] B.C., No. 133 Squadron will follow this same route on 5 October 1942.

No. 133 [Falcon] Squadron patrolled the Canadian section [orange] however, unknown to many Americans, they also patrolled and were even stationed from Bellingham to Tacoma, Washington, [yellow]. This is covered in detail with Daily Diary records in chapter on pilot Gordon Hill.

Secret orders – 8 December 1942- Daily Diary

October 4th, ground personnel consisting of 135 Airmen and Officers, departed from Lethbridge at 23:59 hrs by special C.P.R. train, under supervision of flying Officer Thompson. October 5th, 16 Hurricane and 4 Harvard aircraft, under the supervision of Squadron Leader W. T. Brooks, depart from Lethbridge at 07:20 hrs via Spokane [fuel] and Yakima [fuel-image below], arriving Boundary Bay at 16:00 hrs same day.

After the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, the United States government moved quickly to organize, purchase, or lease local airports to be used as Military training airfields. In the State of Washington, 17 municipal and local civilian airports would be used as military airfields, with new expanded runways, new constructed hangars, and many other improvements. Most of these airfields had been constructed in the 1930’s depression era with funds provided by the United States Works Progress Administration and the Public Work Administration. Three of these airfields became the main Hurricane aircraft ferry route from Alberta to the West Coastal RCAF Stations which were being constructed in 1941-1942.

Felts Field, Spokane, was constructed in 1927, home to the Air National Guard/116th Observation Squadron. It was named in honor of pilot Buell Felts, killed 30 May 1927. During WWII the airfield served as a Civilian Pilots Training Program and provided the USAAF with thousands of pilots. It also became the first ferry fuel stop for RCAF aircraft [No. 135 Bulldogs and No. 133 Falcon] leaving Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada, for Sea Island and boundary Bay, B.C.

McAllister Flying School, Yakima, Washington was cleared of sagebrush in 1926 by Charles McAllister and the first building was completed in 1928, which still survives today. Above is the Yakima Air Terminal in 1940, the same sight the Hurricane pilots of No. 133 Squadron saw on 5 October 1942. This became the second important ferry flight fuel stop for RCAF aircraft, and during WWII the base was part of the Civilian Pilot Training Program.

Bellingham Army Airfield was constructed in 1936, the runway was paved in 1940, and it officially opened on 7 December 1941, the same day the Japanese struck at Pearl Harbor. On 10 December 1941, the U. S. Army moved in and constructed 38 new hangars and buildings, expanded and constructed two more runways, making a major facility for bombers and fighter aircraft. This became the main American base for the protection and defending of Puget Sound area, shared by No. 133 Squadron of the RCAF north at Boundary Bay, B. C. The Daily Operations Record for No. 133 Squadron record many flights in and out of Bellingham Army Airfield, including that of Hurricane fighter 5389.

On 5 October 1942, this Army Airfield provided an emergency stop over for the ferry flight of No. 133 Squadron 16 Hurricane fighters and 4 Harvard trainer aircraft. No RCAF ferry aircraft were required to land at Bellingham Army Airfield. On landing [Boundary Bay] Hurricane 5399, pilot F/Sgt. J. A. Leslie, makes a hard landing [the runways are still under construction] and the aircraft is damaged as Cat. “C” crash.

Two of the squadron Hurricane 5391 and 5392 were left at Lethbridge as they required new Merlin engines, which were being shipped from Fort William. October 12th, Wing Commander Gray and Flight Lt. Assheton arrived at Boundary Bay at 17:25 hrs in Hurricane 5391 and 5392.

The Squadron diary notes –

Housing condition was very poor and inadequate. The Senior NCO’s and airmen were placed in various uncomfortable sections of the station. Civilian construction personnel occupying 2 H-huts and Airmen’s Mess. One hangar is remodeled and at once lectures, physical training and organized sports are started while ground crews attempt their normal duties. The Squadron consists of 29 pilots, 27 trained for overseas duty, 17 Hurricane aircraft and 2 Harvard ready for instrument training. Due to the fact the runways are still under construction no hours of actual flight training are allowed.

The No. 133 Squadron Operations Record [below] states – NOTE –

We submit a “Nil Report” for this period, Oct. 1st to Oct. 26th, 1942, inclusive as the runways at this station are under construction.

The first Hurricane to officially take to the air at Boundary Bay, B.C. was recorded as Hurricane 5389, pilot F/O F. H. Sproule, Practice Scramble, 11:00 to 11:20 hrs, 27 October 1942 [20 minutes].

1 November 1942, strength of unit is :

RCAF Officers [Aircrew] 7,

Ground Crew Officers 2,

Airmen Aircrew 18 and Ground crew 173.

RAF Officers – 4.

Aircraft service ability

Hurricane 12,

Harvard 2.

Duties – Local flying of Sector Reconnaissance, Hurricane Scrambles, and Instrument flying in Harvard aircraft. Each month, five qualified fighter pilots will be posted overseas and replaced by five new graduates from Service Flying Training Schools in Canada.

This RCAF pilot training produced new Canadian fighter pilots for mostly England and gave coastal protection for Canadian Home War Establishment against possible Japanese attack. Only 14 flights had taken place in the month of October and now November would prove to be the break-in period for No. 133 [F] Squadron RCAF.

The total number of flights, date, and pilot name, are now listed for RCAF Hurricane [Calgary] 5389.

November 1942

Hurricane 5389 will make 17 flights in the month of November, which totals 13:25 hrs.

1 November 1942 Sgt. Millar G. G. 9:20 to 10:20 hrs Sector Reconnaissance
1 November 1942 F/Sgt. Curtis W. S. 10:35 to 11:30 hrs Sector Recon.
7 November 1942 P/O D. C. Laubman 15:40 to 16:45 hrs Formation Training
8 November 1942 F/Sgt. Tomlinson C. J 09:40 to 10:40 hrs Formation Training
8 November 1942 P/O D. C. Laubman 15:40 to 1645 hrs Formation Training
10 November 1942 F/Sgt. Walton N. R. 11:10 to 12:10 hrs Practice Scramble
13 November 1942 F/Sgt. McGowan J. G. 10:50 to 11:35 hrs Formation Flying
13 November 1942 Sgt. Costello G. A. 10:20 to 11:20 hrs Formation Flying
15 November 1942 Sgt. Monypenny E. B. 10:55 to 11:55 hrs Formation Flying
18 November 1942 P/O L. R. Brooks 15:10 to 15:40 hrs Scramble
19 November 1942 F/O F. H. Sproule 12:00 to 12:15 hrs Scramble
23 November 1942 Sgt. Young F. B. 13:25 to 13:40 hrs Scramble
24 November 1942 Sgt. Costello G. A. 11:30 to 12:20 hrs Scramble
24 November 1942 F/O R. M. Tracy 15:15 to 15:30 hrs Aircraft Test
27 November 1942 P/O L. R. Allman 16:15 to 17:05 hrs Air Test
28 November 1942 F/Sgt. Walton N. R. 09:35 to 10:35 hrs Squadron drill
28 November 1942 F/ Sgt. R. F. Gainforth 14:00 to 14:40 hrs Squadron Drill

December 1942

1 December 1942, 17 Hurricanes on strength and 5389 will make 13 flights.
1 December 1942 P/O L.R. Allman
1 December 1942 F/Sgt. McGowan J. G.
13 December 1942 P/O L. R. Allman
13 December 1942 P/O G. S. Sargent
14 December 1942 P/O G. S. Sargent
20 December 1942 F/Sgt. Shavalier R.
22 December 1942 F/Sgt. Le Gear F. S.
23 December 1942 P/O D. C. Laubman
30 December 1942 F/Sgt. Law R. R.
30 December 1942 Sgt. Dalsell D. J.
30 December 1942 F/O R. N. Gull
31 December 1942 F/O F. H. Sproule
31 December 1942 Sgt. Gaskin R. A.

January 1943

1 January 1943, 15 Hurricanes on strength and 5389 will make 11 flights.
3 January 1943 Sgt. Young F. B.
4 January 1943 F/Lt. R. W. Mc Nair [DFC] local formation flying.
7 January 1943 F/O F. H. Sproule
7 January 1943 F/O G. S. Sargent
11 January 1943 S/L W. T. Breeks
14 January 1943 P/O D. C. Laubman
27 January 1943 F/Sgt. Walton N. R.
28 January 1943 Sgt. Dalzell D. J.
29 January 1943 P/O R. M. Tracy
30 January 1943 F/Sgt. Law R.R.
31 January 1943 F/Sgt. R. F. Gainforth.

February 1943

1 February 1943, 17 Hurricanes on strength 5389 assigned 31 flights
2 February 1943 F/Sgt. W. S. Curtis
2 February 1943 Sgt. E. E. Grissom
3 February 1943 F/Sgt. H. F. Wakeman
3 February 1943 F/Sgt. R. F. Gainforth

On 4 February 1943, Pilot Officer G. S. Sargent is assigned to fly Hurricane 5398, “March of Dimes” presentation fighter, on a routine map reading night-time exercise. The aircraft never arrives at Patricia Bay, and next morning a search is conducted. The body of pilot Sargent is found.

Mayne, Saturna and North and South Pinder Islands were used by No. 133 squadron for many training flights, conducted between home base at Boundary Bay and Patricia Bay, on Vancouver Island. A number of Hurricane fighters crashed into the waters around these islands, in 1943, 1944 and 1945.

6 February 1943 F/Sgt. A. J. Ness

11 February 1943 F/O R. N. Gull
11 February 1943 F/Sgt A J. Ness
11 February 1943 F/Sgt. F. S. Le Gear
12 February 1943 F/ Sgt. F. S. Le Gear
12 February 1943 F/Sgt. F. S. Le Gear
16 February 1943 Sgt. D. J. Dalsell
19 February 1943 F/L E. H. Treleaven
19 February 1943 F/Sgt. F. S. Le Gear
20 February 1943 Sgt. F. B. Young
20 February 1943 F/O F. H. Sproule
21 February 1943 F/Sgt. W. S. Curtis
21 February 1943 P/O L. R. Allman
22 February 1943 Sgt. Gaskin R. A.
22 February 1943 Sgt. E. E. Grissom
22 February 1943 P/O L. R. Allman
23 February 1943 F/Sgt. H. F. Wakeman
23 February 1943 P/O L. R. Allman
23 February 1943 F/Sgt. F. S. Le Gear
25 February 1943 Sgt. F. B. Young
25 February 1943 Sgt. E. E. Grissom
27 February 1943 P/O L. R. Allman
27 February 1943 F/O R. M. Tracy
27 February 1943 F/Sgt J. A. Leslie
28 February 1943 P/O L. R. Allman
28 February 1943 Sgt. F. B. Young.

March 1943

1 March 1943, 17 Hurricane on strength, 5389 assigned 34 flights
2 March 1943 F/Sgt. C. J. Tomlinson
3 March 1943 F/Sgt. C. J. Tomlinson
5 March 1943 P/O L. R. Allman
5 March 1943 Sgt. E. E. Grissom
7 March 1943 F/Sgt. H. F. Wakeman
7 March 1943 F/Sgt. A. J. Ness
7 March 1943 P/O G. G. Millar
9 March 1943 F/Sgt/ R. A. Gaskin
10 March 1943 F/Sgt. W. S. Curtis
10 March 1943 P/O L. R. Allman
11 March 1943 F/Sgt. J. A. Leslie
11 March 1943 F/Sgt. F. S. Le Gear
13 March 1943 F/Sgt. R. Shavalier
15 March 1943 P/O D. C. Laubman
16 March 1943 F/Sgt. W.S. Curtis
16 March 1943 F/Sgt. J. A. Leslie
17 March 1943 F/Sgt. F. S. Le Gear
17 March 1943 F/Sgt. F. S. Le Gear
17 March 1943 F/Sgt. F. S. Le Gear
19 March 1943 F/Sgt. C. J. Tomlinson
19 March 1943 F/Sgt. C. J. Tomlinson
20 March 1943 F/Sgt. G. A. Costello
20 March 1943 F/Sgt. G. A. Costello
25 March 1943 F/Sgt. C. J. Tomlinson
25 March 1943 F/Sgt. C. J. Tomlinson
25 March 1943 F/Sgt. C. J. Tomlinson
25 March 1943 F/Sgt. C. J. Tomlinson
25 March 1943 F/Sgt. C. J. Tomlinson
26 March 1943 P/O G. G. Millar
28 March 1943 F/Sgt. J. A. Leslie
28 March 1943 F/Sgt. F. B. Young
29 March 1943 F/Sgt. N. R. Walton
29 March 1943 F/Sgt. W.S. Curtis
29 March 1943 F/Sgt. E. B. Monypenny

April 1943

1 April 1943, 16 Hurricanes on strength, 5389 assigned 35 flights
1 April 1943 F/Sgt. W. S. Curtis
2 April 1943 Sgt. E. E. Grissom
2 April 1943 F/Sgt. C. J. Tomlinson
3 April 1943 F/Sgt. H. F. Wakeman
4 April 1943 Sgt. E. E. Grissom
4 April 1943 F/Sgt. C. J. Tomlinson
4 April 1943 Sgt. E. E. Grissom
5 April 1943 F/O F. H. Sproule
5 April 1943 Sgt. E. E. Allman
6 April 1943 P/O L. R. Allman
8 April 1943 F/O F. H. Sproule
9 April 1943 F/Sgt. C. J. Tomlinson
10 April 1943 F/Sgt. R. F. Gainforth
11 April 1943 F/Sgt. G. A. Costello
11 April 1943 F/O F. H. Sproule
12 April 1943 F/O F. H. Sproule
13 April 1943 F/O J. M. Ingalls
13 April 1943 F/O J. M. Ingalls
14 April 1943 F/Sgt. F. B. Young
14 April 1943 F/Sgt. F. B. Young
15 April 1943 F/Sgt. E. B. Monypenny
15 April 1943 F/Sgt. J. A. Leslie
15 April 1943 F/O F. H. Sproule
18 April 1943 P/O J. G. McGowan
18 April 1943 F/Sgt. H. F. Wakeman
18 April 1943 F/O J. M. Ingalls
18 April 1943 F/Sgt. F. B. Young
18 April 1943 F/O F. H. Sproule
19 April 1943 F/O J. M. Ingalls
19 April 1943 F/Sgt. F. B. Young
19 April 1943 F/O R. W. Ferguson
19 April 1943 F/Sgt. F. S. Le Gear
21 April 1943 F/Sgt. E. B. Monypenny
28 April 1943 F/O D. C. Laubman
29 April 1943 F/Sgt. W. S. Curtis.

May 1943

1 May 1943, 6 Officers and 17 Airmen, 19 Hurricanes on strength, 5389 assigned 49 flights.
2 May 1943 F/O R. M. Tracy
2 May 1943 F/Lt. J. B. McCall
2 May 1943 F/O R. M. Tracy
2 May 1943 F/O L. R. Allman
3 May 1943 F/O D. C. Laubman
5 May 1943 F/Sgt. R. F. Gainforth
5 May 1943 F/Sgt. G. J. Tomlinson
6 May 1943 P/O R.R. Law
6 May 1943 P/O R. R. Law
6 May 1943 F/O F. H. Sproule
7 May 1943 F/O R. W. Ferguson
8 May 1943 Sgt. D. J. Dalsell
8 May 1943 F/Sgt. F. S. le Gear
8 May 1943 F/Sgt. F. S. Le Gear
9 May 1943 P/O J. G. McGowan
9 May 1943 F/O R. M. Tracy
9 May 1943 F/Lt. J. B. McCall
9 May 1943 P/O J. G. McGowan
9 May 1943 F/Sgt. R. A. Gaskin
10 May 1943 Sgt. D. J. Dalsell
10 May 1943 F/Lt. J. B. Deek

On 11 May 1943, two new pilots reported to No. 133 squadron, P/O T. W. Wann and Sgt. Gordon M. Hill. The next day, 12 May, F/Sgt. Monypenny was killed flying Hurricane 5383.

Source Facebook page Boundary Bay 1941-1945 

14 May 1943 F/Sgt. R. Shavalier
14 May 1943 F/Sgt. L. R. Allman

15 May 1943 Sgt. Gordon M. Hill [R14282] first flight in Hurricane 5389.

Gordon M. Hill Course #65, continued his pilot training in fall of 1942, No. 13 S. F. T. S. St. Hubert, Quebec. He graduated and received his “Wings” on 22 January 1943, posted to No. 1 Operational Training Unit at Bagotville, Quebec, training Hurricane pilots. Course #8 began on 30 January 1943 and 29 pupils graduated as Hurricane pilots on 23 April 1943. Two pilots were posted to Eastern Air Command of Home War Establishment, while P/O Wann and Sgt. Hill were posted to Western Air Command, No. 133 Squadron at Boundary Bay. B.C.

Graduation photo – 22 January 1943

The full RCAF career of pilot F/O Gordon Hill will be covered in two complete chapters, with over 400 unpublished photos, and new art work.

15 May 1943 F/O F. H. Sproule
16 May 1943 F/Sgt. W. S. Curtis
17 May 1943 F/Sgt. R. Shavalier
18 May 1943 P/O T. W. Wann
18 May 1943 P/O T. W. Wann
18 May 1943 F/O R. M. Tracy
19 May 1943 F/O R. M. Tracy
20 May 1943 P/O R. R. Law
20 May 1943 P/O R. R. Law
20 May 1943 F/O R. M. Tracy
20 May 1943 F/O R. M. Tracy
23 May 1943 F/Sgt. H. F. Wakeman
23 May 1943 Sgt. G. M. Hill
23 May 1943 F/Sgt. H. F. Wakeman
24 May 1943 F/O L. R. Allman
24 May 1943 F/O L. R. Allman
25 May 1943 F/Sgt. W. S. Curtis
25 May 1943 P/O J. M. Ingalls
25 May 1943 F/Sgt. F. S. Le Gear
26 May 1943 F/Sgt. C. J. Tomlinson
26 May 1943 F/Sgt. R. Shavalier
28 May 1943 P/O T. W. Wann
31 May 1943 Sgt. G. M. Hill
31 May 1943 P/O R. R. Law
31 May 1943 F/O F. H. Sproule

June 1943

1 June 1943, 15 Hurricane on strength, 5389 assigned 47 flights.
1 June 1943 Sgt. G. M. Hill
1 June 1943 F/L J. B. McCall
1 June 1943 F/L J. B. McCall
1 June 1943 F/Sgt. F. S. Le Gear
2 June 1943 F/L J. B. McCall
3 June 1943 F/O F. H. Sproule
4 June 1943 F/Sgt. H. F. Wakeman
4 June 1943 F/Sgt. H. F. Wakeman
5 June 1943 F/Sgt. H. F. Wakeman
5 June 1943 F/Sgt. N.F. Wakeman
5 June 1943 F/Sgt. R. A. Gaskin
6 June 1943 F/Sgt. R. A. Gaskin
6 June 1943 WO2 W. S. Curtis
6 June 1943 Sgt. G. M. Hill [13:00) to 14:00 hrs – submarine search]
6 June 1943 Sgt. D. J. Dalsell
7 June 1943 F/L J. B. McCall
7 June 1943 F/Sgt. R. A. Gaskin
7 June 1943 Sgt. D. J. Dalsell
7 June 1943 F/Sgt. J. A. Leslie
7 June 1943 W02 W.S. Curtis
7 June 1943 W02 W. S. Curtis
8 June 1943 W02 W. S. Curtis
8 June 1943 W02 W. S. Curtis
9 June 1943 P/O R. R. Law
9 June 1943 W02 W. S. Curtis
9 June 1943 F/Sgt. R. A. Gaskin
10 June 1943 F/O R. M. Tracy
11 June 1943 W02 A. J. Ness
12 June 1943 W02 A. J. Ness
13 June 1943 W02 R. F. Gainforth
13 June 1943 F/Sgt. R. A. Gaskin
13 June 1943 W02 R. F. Gainforth
13 June 1943 W02 R. F. Gainforth
17 June 1943 W02 F. S. LeGear
18 June 1943 F/O T. W. Wann
18 June 1943 F/Sgt. R. A. Gaskin
19 June 1943 F/O L. R. Allman
21 June 1943 Sgt. D. J. Dalsell
22 June 1943 Sgt. D. J. Dalsell
22 June 1943 F/O R. M. Tracy
22 June 1943 F/O R. M. Tracy
23 June 1943 F/Sgt. R. A. Gaskin
23 June 1943 F/L J. B. McCall
23 June 1943 F/O L. R. Allman
24 June 1943 W02 R. W. Ferguson
27 June 1943 W02 A. J. Ness
28 June 1943 F/L J. B. McCall

The last scramble at Boundry Bay, B.C. is recorded on 30 June 1943, 08:00 to 08:50 hrs when two Hurricane aircraft 5395 and 5397 complete a sea patrol. The squadron now prepare for the movement to Tofino, B.C.

Fourteen Hurricane Mk. XII fighter aircraft and two Harvard Mk. IIB aircraft fly to the new base at Tofino, B. C. Hurricane 5389 is piloted by F/O R. W. Ferguson and his flight time is 15:45 to 17:00 hrs.

July 1943

The squadron begin operations on 5 July and Hurricane 5389 will make 19 flights in the month of July 1943.

5 July 1943 W02 A. J. Ness
5 July 1943 F/O J. M. Ingalls
6 July 1943 P/O J. G. McGowan
6 July 1943 W02 J. A. Leslie
9 July 1943 W02 W.S. Curtis
9 July 1943 W02 W. S. Curtis
9 July 1943 Sgt. G. M. Hill Formation Attack – 14:10 to 15:00 hrs.
10 July 1943 F/O V. J. Le Gear
11 July 1943 F/Sgt. J. V. Burke
11 July 1943 W02 J. A. Leslie
11 July 1943 F/O T. W. Wann
12 July 1943 W02 J. A. Leslie
12 July 1943 W02 J. A. Leslie
12 July 1943 W02 J. A. Leslie
12 July 1943 W/C C. N. Greenway
13 July 1943 F/Sgt. J. V. Burke
13 July 1943 F/Sgt. R. A. Gaskin
14 July 1943 P/O R. H. Brown
14 July 1943 P/O F. D. Hague 15:05 to 16:15 hrs., – “Crashed” Cat. “B”.

On 22 July 1943, Hurricane 5389 is loaded onto a ship and transported to No. 13 Aeronautical Inspection District, Vancouver, B. C. [Coates Ltd.] for repairs. Hurricane 5389 remained at No. 13 A.I.D. until 15 March 1944.

In the fall of 1938, the RCAF decided to create repair units close to major aircraft companies in Canada. This allowed technically experienced civilian personnel to assist aircraft contractors and report back to the RCAF Headquarters on how repair work was being carried out as well as inspections on the quality of repair work. These new units were designated as RCAF Technical Detachments and given numbers. No. 11 T.D. – Montreal, Quebec, No. 12 T.D. – Toronto, Ontario, No. 13 T.D. – Vancouver, B. C., No. 14 T. D. – Ottawa, Ontario, No. 15 T. D. – Winnipeg, Manitoba, No. 16 T. D. – Edmonton, Alberta, and No. 17 T. D. at Halifax, Nova Scotia. In 1940, these units were re-designated as RCAF Aeronautical Inspection Districts and formerly No. 13 Technical Detachment became No. 13 A.I.D. at Vancouver, B.C. also called “Coates Ltd” for the civilian company. In July 1943, a significant number of RCAF aircraft required repair work and to assist this high demand a priority system was established. The Canadian built Hurricane fighters were no longer a front line aircraft and they took a backseat to repair of other important aircraft. Hurricane 5389 would remain [parked] under repair when time permitted, at No. 13 A.I.D. Vancouver, B. C. for the next eight months.

No. 133 [Falcon] Fighter Squadron continued to fly Hurricane aircraft on West Coast air defence from Tofino, B. C., until 9 March 1944, when they were transferred to Sea Island, [Vancouver] B.C. This became part of what many historians call the “RCAF musical chairs” when complete squadrons moved from base to base and switched aircraft from squadron to squadron.

This has caused many problems for Internet historians and fogged over the true history of Hurricane 5389. Fortunately, the wartime Daily Diaries of both No. 133 and 135 squadrons are very detailed and contain a wealth of information on what in fact took place.

On 10 March 1944, [above record Daily Diary] No. 133 Squadron ferried 17 of their original Hurricane Mk. XII fighters from Tofino, to Patricia Bay, and then to Sea Island, [Vancouver, B.C. F/O Gordon Hill flew Hurricane 5378 to Sea Island, Vancouver, B. C. These Hurricanes are now parked [Vancouver] and No. 133 Squadron will receive 18 Kittyhawk fighters, Mk. I, [11] Mk. IA, [2] and Mk. III [5] aircraft transferred from No. 163 Squadron, which will be disbanded at Patricia Bay, B. C. on 15 March 1944.

To add to this confusion, we have 16 ex-135 Hurricane fighters parked at Terrace, B.C.
No. 135 [Bulldog] Squadron began to ferry their 16 Hurricane fighters [plus two Harvard trainers] from Annette Island, Alaska, [U. S. Command] to Terrace, B.C. on 17 November 1943. They flew patrols from Terrace until 29 February 1944 when they stood down until 11 March 1944, pending a move to Patricia Bay, B.C. They left their original Hurricane aircraft at Terrace, B.C. and the pilots were ferried to Patricia Bay. B. C. on 12 March 1944. No. 170 [Ferry] Squadron began moving the 16 Hurricanes fighters to Patricia Bay on 31 March 1944. The last #5579 arrived at Patricia Bay, B.C. 31 January 1945.

The No. 135 Squadron Daily Diary for 12 March 1944 records – “Arrived Vancouver, Sunday Morning at 10:00 hrs. The party split at C.N.R. Depot and 18 pilots led by S/L Smith [Sqdn. O. C.] proceeding to Sea Island to ferry Hurricane aircraft which formerly operated by No. 133 [F] Squadron. Upon arrival at Sea Island it was discovered only 15 Hurricanes were available, and three Harvard. The party under S/L Smith, piloted the Hurricanes over to Patricia Bay and arrived at 12:00 hrs.

These 15 original No. 133 Squadron Hurricane aircraft are now transferred to No. 135 [Bulldog] Squadron and flown from Sea Island, [Vancouver] to Patricia Bay. B. C. on 12 March 1944. Hurricane 5394 [original No. 133 Sqn. fighter] and 5413 [original No. 135 Sqn. fighter] were not serviceable and after repairs, will join No. 135 Squadron at Patricia Bay on 22 April 1944.

Thanks to this confusion of RCAF Hurricane fighters being switched [musical chairs] from No. 133 Squadron to No. 135 Squadron, the location of Hurricane 5389 has been lost by many historians. The Daily Diary of No. 13 Aeronautical Inspection [Coates Ltd. Vancouver] contains the facts on [Calgary] Hurricane 5389.

On 15 March 1944, No. 13 Aeronautical Inspection District, [Coates Ltd. Vancouver] notify No. 133 Squadron that Hurricane 5389 has been repaired and is ready for return to their squadron. P/O R. A. Gaskin [No. 133 Sqn.] picks up Hurricane 5389 at 10:10 hrs and flies it to No. 135 Squadron in Patricia Bay, arriving at 10:40 hrs. Hurricane 5389 will become the 17th ex-No. 133 Squadron fighter aircraft to be transferred to No. 135 [Bulldog] Squadron and for the second time in her career, 5389 will now fly with the ‘Bulldogs’ stationed at Patricia Bay, B. C.

Remember, Hurricane 5389 began her RCAF career training No. 135 pilots at Mossbank, Saskatchewan, from 8-26 July 1942, and now she will end her career with No. 135 [Bulldog] Squadron at Patricia Bay, B.C.

No. 133 Squadron will fly the Curtiss Kittyhawk from mid-March 1944 to July 1945.

The No. 135 Daily Diary reports on 10 May 1944 all pilots have soloed on the new Kittyhawk fighters, with the exception of two pilots on leave. The old ex-No. 133 Squadron Hurricane fighters are only flown for airframe and engine tests, preparing them for upcoming ferry flights.
Hurricane 5389 is last flown in No. 135 Squadron on 22 May 1944, pilot P/O Hodgins B. H., 15:15 to 16:15 hrs airframe and engine testing.

The next chapter in Hurricane 5389 is about to begin, and this involves the ferrying of thousands of war surplus aircraft across Canada.

In early December 1943, the Ottawa Supervisory Board began discussing the need to expand the BCATP in Canada, beyond the 31 March 1945 termination date which had been agreed upon in 1942. In early February 1944, Harold Balfour, British Under Secretary of State for Air and Air Marshal Sir Peter Drummond, RAF Air Member for Training arrived in Ottawa for meetings with Canadian Air Minister C. G. Power. On 16 February, Power officially explained to the Canadian House of Commons the need for a cutback in BCATP aircrew training. The reduction would be forty per cent and this involved the closing of 33 aircrew training schools out of a total of eight-two currently in operation.

At the request of the British government, Canada had agreed to close the 26 RAF schools first, and this began on 14 January 1944, when No. 33 [RAF] Elementary Flying Training School at Caron, Saskatchewan was closed. No. 41 [RAF] Service Flying Training School, Weyburn, Sask., was closed on 22 January 44, followed by No. 35 [RAF] S.F.T.S. North Battleford, Sask., on 25 February 1944, then No. 37 S.F.T.S. [RAF H.Q.] at Calgary, Alberta, 10 March 1944, and so on.
By the end of November 1944, all but two British RAF Schools in Canada had closed, including 13 schools located in No. 4 and No. 2 Air Training Commands in Western Canada. With the closing of these BCATP airfields, the Canadian Government began to plan for the end of hostilities and the future plans for these abandoned military airfields.

The first priority became the huge storage of surplus military equipment, including thousands of unwanted vehicles, supplies, and ex-wartime aircraft. To move this vast amount of military aircraft to the new storage holding units a new ferry squadron of RCAF pilots was required. On 1 March 1944, No. 170 [Ferry] Squadron was formed at Winnipeg, Manitoba, using RCAF personnel from the Western Detachment of No. 124 [Ferry] Squadron. This new squadron was assigned the task of ferrying over 5,000 training and operational aircraft in Western Canada, including the old Hurricane fighters used by No. 163, No. 135, and No. 133 Squadrons in the air defense of the West Coast.

On 26 May 1944, No. 170 [Ferry] Squadron pilots arrived at No. 135 [Bulldog] Squadron Patricia Bay, and ferry out the first two Hurricane aircraft, 5379 and 5425. Hurricane 5379 was an original No. 133 Squadron Hurricane fighter [16 June 1942] and 5425 was an original No. 135 Squadron fighter [18 June 1942]. Hurricane 5425 was ferried from Terrace, B. C. to Patricia Bay, B. C. on 3 October 1944.

On 27 May 44, No. 170 ferry pilots arrive at No. 135 Squadron and ferry out 5394 and 5413. Again, Hurricane 5394 is an original No. 133 Sqn. fighter [30 June 1942] and 5413 is an original No. 135 Sqn. fighter [23 July 1942]. Hurricane 5413 was ferried from Terrace, B. C. to Patricia Bay, on 31 March 1944.

On 1 June 1944, No. 135 [Bulldog] Squadron have 13 Hurricane fighters on strength but not in use. These 13 fighters are all ex-No. 133 Squadron aircraft which now includes [Calgary] Hurricane 5389. On 21 June 44, No. 170 [Ferry] squadron pilots begin the movement of Hurricanes from Patricia Bay, B. C. to Yakima and Spokane, Washington, USA, to Lethbridge detachment in southern Alberta. The last flight of a Hurricane by No. 135 Squadron took place at Patricia Bay on 25 June 1944, W02 Connor J. W. flew Hurricane 5377 from 16:30 to 17:00 hrs on engine test. This became the last Hurricane to leave No. 135 Squadron for Lethbridge that same date. The exact date that Hurricane 5389 was ferried to Lethbridge, Alberta, was never recorded in the Daily Diary of No. 135 Squadron or by No. 170 [Ferry] squadron, who only recorded the number of aircraft ferried on each date. On 24 June 44, No. 170 Sqn. ferried six Hurricanes from Patricia Bay, B. C. to Lethbridge Detachment, Alberta, and I believe that was the date Hurricane 5389 arrived at Lethbridge, Alberta. It appears the Hurricane fighters remained at Lethbridge for at least five months. No. 32 SFTS [RAF] Moose Jaw, Sask., closed on 17 October 1944, and No. 4 Training Command ceased to exist on 1 December 1944, replaced by No. 2 Air Command.

On 2 December 1944, the old RAF base became No. 2 Reserve Equipment Maintenance Unit, RCAF, Moose Jaw, Sask. The first “Forty-Two” storage aircraft arrived on 5 December 1944, and were placed into hangars. The very last RAF personnel are repatriated back to the United Kingdom on 2 January 1945. In the next few weeks No. 170 [Ferry] Squadron pilots will fly eleven Hurricane fighters for “Reserve Storage” at Moose Jaw, Sask.

One of them is 5389, today Calgary Flight Hangar Museum.

On 1 July 1944, the Canadian Government began to plan and create Surplus Equipment Holding Units at the abandoned WWII British Commonwealth Air Training Plan bases across Canada. No. 170 [Ferry] squadron which had been formed on 1 March 1944, were now responsible for the ferrying of all surplus RCAF aircraft to these vacant training bases. The RCAF had on strength 12,000 surplus aircraft, and many, like the Avro Ansons, were just set on fire and destroyed. Others, including the Hurricanes Mk. XIIs, were flown to an “Aircraft Holding Unit” where they were stored and maintained in flying condition, and could be flown out on short notice.
On 1 December 1944, a total reorganization and re-naming of the storage units took place. The name was changed to “RESERVE EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE UNITS” with a Headquarters and reserve satellite units located in the old training bases. On this date No. 4 and No. 2 [WWII] Training Commands ceased to exist and were replaced by No. 2 Air Command. On record cards, it appears that aircraft were moved, however only the Air Force Command names were changed.

No. 1 Reserve Equipment Maintenance Unit was established at Lethbridge, Alberta, on 15 December 1944, ex-No. 8 Bombing and Gunnery School. Under its command were three Satellite Units, No. 101 at Macleod, Alberta, No. 102 at Pearce, Alberta, and No. 103 at Vulcan, Alberta.

No. 2 Reserve E. M. U. was located at Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, on 2 December 1944, [Ex-RAF 32 SFTS] and under it were formed four Reserve Equipment Maintenance Satellite Units. No. 201 at Dafoe, Sask., No. 202 at Mossbank, Sask., No. 203 at Caron, Sask., No. 204 at Assiniboia, Sask., and No. 205 at Davidson, Saskatchewan.

At least eleven Hurricane fighters were held in storage at units under command of No. 2 Reserved Equipment Maintenance Unit, Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan. Their serial numbers appear in the Daily Diary of various units, when they were flown during some special event. They were just a group of old WWII fighters, which were outdated, ready for scrapping and of no further use to the Air Force. That all changed in early November 1944, and saved them from being scrapped. The confirmed Hurricane serial numbers are – 5377, 5389 [Calgary], 5393, 5418 [Wetaskiwin], 5414, 5424 [fake serial in England], 5447, 5584 [Ottawa], and 5588. The two unidentified Hurricane fighters are possibly – 5395 and 5478.

Beginning on 3 November 1944, and continuing until late June 1945, Japan launched between 9,000 and 10,000 incendiary balloons from their home islands. This history can be found on many websites and in numerous publications, which does not need to be repeated. The first line of defence for the RCAF became the West Coast of Canada, and this involved de Havilland F.B. Mk. 26 Mosquito fighters flown by No. 133 Squadron. The RCAF Mosquito aircraft were the only West Coast fighters to attain the speed and altitude to possibly intercept the Japanese balloons, travelling at 125 m.p.h. at over 35,000 feet.

In January 1945, a ‘secret’ second line of defence was being established by the RCAF and this involved old Hurricanes based in the Prairies, to track and possibly shoot-down the Fu-go weapons. In February 1945, Air Commodore B. F. Johnson, No. 2 Air Command, [Winnipeg] ordered a number of Hawker Hurricane fighters be removed from reserve storage at [No. 2 R.E.M.U.] Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, flown to No. 8 Repair Depot, Winnipeg, and made ready for flying Fu-go [Japanese Fire-Balloon] interception duties. Historians record the number of Hurricane fighters at five, however my research indicates six or possibly seven Hurricane aircraft were involved in these patrols for balloons. The proof is there, in Ottawa, if you take time to research it, page by page.

These Hurricane fighter serial numbers first appear recorded in the Daily Diary for No. 8 Repair Depot, Winnipeg, Manitoba, dated 2 February 1945. Hurricane 5418 arrives for a new Merlin 29 engine, from No. 2 Reserve Equipment Maintenance Unit, Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan. The fighter is stored in hangar #4, awaiting a new engine and other parts. A Merlin 29-233 engine is installed, and completed on 17 February 1945, the fighter is returned to storage at No. 2 R.E.H.U, by a pilot from 170 [Ferry] Squadron.

This rare fighter survives today in the world class aviation museum at Wetaskiwin, Alberta, today run by Alberta Culture and Community Spirit Heritage, with Byron Reynolds, AME, Honorary Curator of the Aviation Program.

Movement of Airframe and Aero Engines for month of February 1944, No. 8 Repair Depot, Winnipeg, Manitoba.

Hurricane 5418 is one of the first five fighters selected for duty in Saskatchewan. It is flown to No. 8 Repair Depot for minor engine repairs on 2 February 1945, and requires a new Merlin engine, which is installed by 17 February 1945. This Merlin 29 remains in the fighter today.
In 1986, I met Bryon Reynolds, at the then titled “Reynolds Museum Ltd” Wetaskiwin, Alberta. In 1998, I was invited, and gave two lectures on my subject of WWII aircraft nose art. On 27 December 2000, I received a phone call from Bryon, and he ask if I would paint the replica No. 135 “Bulldog” on the nose of Hurricane 5418. He knew my answer, but made it very clear, the nose art must be as close to the original as possible, and that including counting the aircraft rivets. Working with Byron was very professional and followed the same standard as that in the Smithsonian, Washington, D.C., USA.

This was the original pattern ‘nose art’ Bulldog approved by Bryon Reynolds. I spent six hours with Bryon and obtained as much history on Hurricane 5418 as I could. I was in for a big surprise, involving a rare part of unknown RCAF “Fu-go” nose art. This complete new history, with paintings, will appear next year [2018] on my Blog. Here is a small part of that story.

The Reynolds-Alberta Museum Hurricane 5418, ex-No. 135 [Bulldog] Squadron, was obtained by Stan Reynolds from a Saskatchewan farmer in November 1960.

Byron Reynolds – March 2001

When Hurricane 5418 arrived at No. 4 S.F.T.S. at Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, on 15 June 1945, it still contained the original image of the 135 Bulldog nose art. This was over-painted and a new nose art image appeared over the section where the Bulldog had been painted. This “Beautifull Balloon” nose art was still on the Hurricane engine cowling when it arrived at Wetaskiwin in November 1960. Bryon Reynolds copied the image and my replica painting is being shown for the first time.

The only WWII RCAF “Fu-go” nose art in the world. [Complete history coming in 2018]

Yes, that is the correct spelling for Hurricane 5418 nose art, painted in June 1945.

On 22 February 1945, Hurricane 5588 arrives at No. 8 Repair Depot for modification. This is completed on 9 April, and No. 170 [Ferry] squadron fly 5588 to No. 23 E.F.T.S. at Yorkton, Saskatchewan. The Daily Diary records one Hurricane taken on charge, no pilot name, no report of balloon sightings, and no scramble of the fighter. It appears there was total censorship by the C.O. at Yorkton, Sask.

On 12 March 1945, Hurricane, 5377, 5584, [Ottawa] and 5389 [Calgary] are flown in by No. 170 [Ferry] Sqdn. pilots for modification. When these three aircraft were placed into “Reserve Storage” [No. 2 R.E.M.U.] Moose Jaw, Sask., the radio, all armour plating, and the twelve .303 Cal. Browning machine guns were removed. The modification at Winnipeg involved replacing the radio and one .303 machine gun, for shooting at the Japanese balloons. Hurricane 5389, [Calgary] is completed on 14 March 1945, and flown to No. 23 EFTS at Yorkton, Saskatchewan, joining Hurricane 5588.

On 17 March 1945, Hurricane 5393 arrives for modification [below] and leaves the same date, flown by 170 [Ferry] Squadron to No. 4 SFTS at Saskatoon, Sask.

Hurricane 5393 completes patrols with no balloon sightings, or records appearing, until 8 June 1945, at 21:55 hrs.

Hurricane 5584 arrives at Winnipeg on 12 March 1945, and departs (No. 170 [Ferry] Sqn.) 19 March 1945, for No. 32 SFTS at Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan. [seen with records of Hurricane 5393, 17 March 1945] Hurricane 5377, which arrived with 5584 [Ottawa] and 5389 [Calgary] was never modified or assigned to any RCAF Station. It was prepared for being inhibited, 30 May 1945, and returned to No 3 S.E.H.U at Swift Current, Sask.

5377 remained at Swift Current, Sask., where it was sold on 13 July 1946.

Hurricane 5418 arrived at No. 8 Repair Depot on 7 May 1945, for modification of radio and machine gun.

Hurricane 5418, was taken on charge at No. 4 S.F.T.S at Saskatoon, Sask. 15 June 1945 and joins 5393 in patrols. Its first action is recorded on 21 June 1945, over Climax, Sask.

Thanks to these No. 8 Repair Depot records and base RCAF Daily Diary reports, the number and location of the RCAF Hurricane “Fu-go” fighters can be confirmed. There were five original Hurricanes, which No. 2 Air Command stationed at Saskatoon, [two] Yorkton, [two] and Moose Jaw, [one] Saskatchewan, beginning on 14 March 1945 and then removed, one by one, ending on 12 July 1945.

The Government assigned the Canadian Army as the chief agency to find, and most of all transport bomb disposal experts to the crash site. This same operation is going on today, as these 1944-1945 fire balloon bombs are still being discovered, the latest at Lumby, B.C., in October 2014.

The five RCAF Hurricane fighters were given the task of shooting down the balloons, then the RCAF would transport Army experts to the site, and last, the recovered material was flown by RCAF transport to Ottawa. The Canadian Government feared the balloons were transporting biological weapons of war, and total censorship was applied. This lack of records and no newspaper reporting has affected the true research and history to present day. The use of old RCAF Daily Diary for the period has released many hidden facts.

The peak Japanese balloon-launching months were February, March, and April 1945. Only four RCAF Hurricane fighters were on patrol during these three months. #5389 on 14 March 1945, #5393 on 17 March 1945, #5584 on 19 March 1945, and #5588 on 10 April 1945. Hurricane 5418 arrived on 15 June, near the end of the patrol period. A sixth [and last] Hurricane #5447, arrived at Yorkton, Sask., on 6 June 1945, but never taken on strength, [two Hurricanes appear in Daily Diary for end of June, 5588-5389] after twenty days, 5447 was flown to No. 3 S.E.H.U. at Swift Current, Saskatchewan, 26-27 June, and inhibited by 1 October 1945. Hurricane 5447, never appears in the Daily Diary and only two Hurricanes are ever shown taken on strength at Yorkton, Sask., for the month of June 1945. I believe 5447 was assigned to Moose Jaw, then during delivery the patrols were cancelled, and 5447 ended up at Yorkton, for twenty days and one photo was taken. [Photo on Vintage Wings site]

Hurricane 5447 was being ferried by P/O Ramsay of No. 124 [Ferry] Squadron, Rockcliffe, Ontario, on 4 September 1942. It had a category “A” crash one-half mile north-west of Porquis Junction, Ontario. It was salvaged and transported back to Fort William for a completed rebuild. Taken on strength RCAF No. 1 Training Command, it served with Home War Establishment at Nova Scotia from 2 October 1942 to 5 July 1943. It was sent to No. 3 Training Command for repairs and placed into storage 29 November 1944. On 4 June 1945, it was taken out of storage and flown to No. 2 Air Command at Yorkton, Saskatchewan.

There are no records of modification for Hurricane 5447 at No. 8 Repair Depot, Winnipeg, and it appears no machine gun was ever installed. No. 8 R.D. had a fleet of mobile panel trucks with mechanics who drove to RCAF Stations for minor aircraft repairs. On 24 June 1945, Winnipeg, No. 8 R.D. mobile party [five workers] did a special inspection [M.5] on Hurricane 5389 and 5447 at No. 23 E.F.T.S., Yorkton, Sask. This proves the Hurricane was at the station, but never shows up in any other records. I believe this was to prepare the two fighters for storage [inhibited], and they were next flown to No. 3 Surplus Equipment Holding Unit at Swift Current, Saskatchewan, between 12 and 18 July. No. 5447 was recorded ready for disposal on 12 July 1945, inhibited in October, with 312:40 hrs airframe flying time. Sold on 28 August 1946.

On 28 August 1946, #5447 was sold to a Regina farmer and years later re-sold to Harry Whereatt of Assiniboia, Sask. in 1988. The aircraft came with nose art name “Star Dust” and large yellow 71 painted on the original engine cowling. It was slowly being restored to flying condition by Harry until he became ill [stroke] and sold it to Vintage Wings of Canada, 23 August 2006. It is still under restoration at V.W. in Ottawa, and will appear as the famous fighter of Calgary’s Willie McKnight. Vintage Wings have many highly qualified research experts, and I’m sure the full history of #5447 will appear on their website. I am interested to see if my amateur research is at all close.

Swift Current, Saskatchewan

No. 39 Service Flying Training School. Swift Current, Saskatchewan, was a British R.A.F. school, one of 26 that operated in Canada during WWII. The last class of trainees, Course #63, began on 29 November 1943 and 55 graduated on 24 March 1944. That is the same date the British school was disbanded. On 1 April 44, a new school re-opened by the RCAF as No. 402 Aircraft Holding Unit. It was unique in RCAF history, as it was never fully established when it was disbanded at 23:59 hrs, 21 May 1944. It had a staff of six officers, 51 airmen and 42 civilians, plus temporary personnel of 103. It was formed to store and maintain RCAF surplus aircraft in flying condition, then the RCAF senior command began to restructure aircraft holding units, and it became RCAF Station, Swift Current, Saskatchewan.

On 1 May 1945, RCAF Swift Current re-opened as No. 3 Surplus Equipment Holding Unit, Swift Current. By the end of the month they had 432 aircraft in storage, including two Hurricane Mk. XII fighters. The Daily Diary for May 1945, contains only one Hurricane serial number, #5414 which had been on a Victory Loan Drive from 11 April 1945. This is an ex-135 [Bulldog] fighter which records her tire being repaired on 4 August 1945, at No. 3 S.E.H.U. 5414 was inhibited in October 1945, and sold on 20 August 1946.

From early June to 18 July 1945, eight Hurricane fighters arrive for storage and the following day [19] one more Hurricane arrives. That brings the total to 11 Hurricanes on strength. This is recorded in the Daily Diary for 31 July 1945, and they also have 205 Avro Anson trainers in storage. A good number of these will be set on fire and destroyed.

Five of these Hurricane Mk. XII fighters were ex- “Fu-go” Japanese Balloon fighters, which were taken on charge at Yorkton, Moose Jaw, and Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. The following history was found in a number of RCAF Daily Diary records, giving a much clearer picture of what took place in after June 1945.
1. #5389 [ex-133 Sqn.] returned 26 June 1945, Inhibited 15 November 1945. Sold 20 August 1946.
2. #5393 [ex-133 Sqn.] returned 18 July 1945. Sold 20 August 1946.
3. #5418 [ex-135 Sqn.] returned 18 July 1945, flown to Air show at Winnipeg, 4 August, and returned 22 August 1945. Inhibited in October 1945. Sold 20 August 1946.
4. #5447 (No. 170 [Ferry] Sqn.) arrived 26-27 June 1945. Inhibited in October. Sold 28 August 1946.
5. #5584 [ex-163- 135] [at the Canadian Aviation and Space Museum, in Ottawa, today] arrived 22 August 1945, picked up by F/O Saidler, 13 June 1946, flew in Winnipeg airshow 12-13th July and then Edmonton 26 July 46. F/L Anderson was the Edmonton pilot, then the Hurricane had engine problems and could not fly. 28 July 1946, flown to Winnipeg. Never sold, saved for display and today in Ottawa, still owned by Canadian Government. Flown only 196:55 hrs.

6. #5588 [ex-163 Sqn.] arrived early June 1945. Picked up by F/O Dibnah R.H. at Swift Current, on 13 June 1946, and flown in Airshow at Winnipeg, by F/O Saidler D. 12-13 July 46. Flown in Edmonton Airshow by F/L Anderson on 26 July 65. Suffered a flat tire at Suffield, Alberta, 28 July 46. Inhibited at unknown location, and not sold until 22 October 1953.

The mystery Hurricane #5424. [Possibly flew in Manitoba]

This Hurricane 5424, was an original No. 135 [Bulldog] Squadron fighter which was stored at No. 18 Staging Unit, Terrace, B.C. on 12 March 1944. The ferrying of 15 Bulldog stored Hurricanes from Terrace to Patricia Bay, B.C. began on 31 March 44, when No. 170 [Ferry] squadron pilots departed with #5413 and #5414. They completed a second record flight for the RCAF, when they returned using the little known “Internal British Columbia Staging Route” with airfields at RCAF Vanderhoof, RCAF Quesnel, RCAF Williams Lake and the most important RCAF Dog Creek.

When No. 135 Squadron flew to join the Americans in their Alaskan Command [RCAF “Y” Wing, Annette, Alaska] on 16 August 1943, they were the first RCAF squadron to fly this interior route, which was still under construction. Now they became the first to return to Patricia Bay, using the same interior route. On 7 September 1944, Lodestar 555 delivered six 170 ferry pilots to Terrace, B.C. at 15:30 hrs. They were assigned Hurricane #5407, #5411, #5418, #5421, #5424 [above] and #5589, departing Terrace, B.C. at 18:00 hrs. The remote RCAF Station Dog Creek had just been installed with night time landing lights, due to the fact it was a most important 24-hour fueling point. [In 1944-1945, this RCAF Station saved the lives of many Canadian and American fuel-starved aircraft] Today it is gone from sight and totally forgotten. Just before midnight, 7 Sept. 1944, the six Hurricane aircraft arrived for fuel, and became the first night-time landing and take-off at RCAF Station Dog Creek. Hurricane 5424 was now flown to Patricia Bay, and next ferried back to Lethbridge, Alberta, by No. 170 Squadron, possibly in November 1944. Possibly placed into storage at No. 2 Reserve Equipment Maintenance Unit, Moose Jaw, Sask., on 5 December 1945. Forty-two aircraft arrived on that date. I cannot find any serial record in any RCAF unit Daily Diary.

No. 3 Bombing and Gunnery School at MacDonald, Manitoba, did not close until 17 February 1945. On 13 September 1944, they had on charge two Hawker Hurricane fighters and received three more on that date, total now five. No serial numbers are listed.

On the 19 September 1945, Hurricane 5424 arrives at No. 8 Repair Depot, Winnipeg, for minor repairs. It is next flown to No. 3 Bombing and Gunnery School, Macdonald, Manitoba, for storage.

Eight months later, spring of 1946, Hurricane #5424 is found in storage at No. 3 S.E.H.U. at Swift Current, Saskatchewan, where it is sold on 15 August 1946. It was later obtained by Lynn Garrison and moved to Calgary, along with Hurricane 5389. 5424 is leased, without any approval by owner Lynn Garrison, to a man in Saskatchewan, where it is secretly sold to a millionaire in U.K. It arrives in England, then it is reported ‘stolen’ to Calgary Police, and nothing can be done. It sits for five years in U.K. with no serial number, then it is registered with a false number. It is sold, and then appears with a new serial number, again false, and now the owners are attempting to flog it to anyone with over two million bucks to thrown away on a false fighter, with a false history. A pure crime of Canadian and British greed, caused by money, which can only be solved by more money. Buy it, return it to Canada, and paint it correctly as 5424.

Hurricane 5424 is the ninth confirmed WWII Canadian Mk. XII Hurricane, out of a total of eleven, which were in storage at No. 3 S.E.H.U. at Swift Current, Saskatchewan, June 1945 to July-August 1946. For many years, it has been rumored this Hurricane flew patrols against the Japanese Fu-go Balloons, however this history is still a mystery. Rivers, Manitoba, had one Spitfire and one Mosquito for tracking balloons drifting that far East.

Thanks to the Japanese Fu-go Balloons, the five [original] Hurricanes assigned to shoot them down, remained protected and stored in Western Canada. That protected them from being scrapped, and three [5389, 5418 and 5447] were purchased by Saskatchewan farmers, preserving our RCAF past, and now they are found in Calgary, Wetaskiwin, and [Vintage Wings of Canada] Ottawa.

The fourth Hurricane 5584 can be found in the Canadian Aviation and Space Museum in Ottawa, sitting beside our Lancaster Mk. X which has been painted incorrectly for the past fifty years.

Collection Pierre Lagacé 2015

Collection Pierre Lagacé 2015

Collection Pierre Lagacé 2015

Collection Pierre Lagacé 2015

Such a beautiful Canadian built Mk. XII Hurricane fighter, with almost no historical information. It flew with No. 163 Squadron, and was placed into “Reserve Storage” a number of times, available for disposal 12 July 1945. On 18 April 1946, retained by RCAF for purpose of display. To the average visitor of “our” Canadian Aviation and Space Museum, this is not a very important or interesting WWII fighter aircraft. But wait, it is most important, provided it receives the correct historical information, and they remove the British spinner from the nose.

The Ottawa Hurricane [today] is displayed with a “Canadian” manufactured spinner, which the average person has no idea about. So, visitors just think it is “British”, and that’s the point I am attempting to make.

Here is a photo which shows a first Canadian spinner, appearing in No. 133 Squadron at Tofino, B.C., March 1944.

Collection Gordon Hill

Only a few Hurricanes received this spinner, as the aircraft was obsolete by 1944, and being replaced by the Kittyhawks. The photo was taken at Tofino, B.C. before the move to Sea Island, Vancouver, on 10 March 1944. This was Hurricane #5377 [“S”] of S/L W.C. Connell, the C.O., and possibly the only one to received this Canadian spinner.

No. 163 [Army Co-operation] Squadron was formed at Sea Island, [Vancouver] B.C. on 1 March 1943. They flew obsolete Bristol Bolingbroke Mk. IV aircraft on West Coast photographic assignments, and the North American Harvard Mk. II, in close support of Army troops in ground training exercises at Camp Wainwright, Alberta. In late June 1943, the squadron was converted to fly the Hurricane Mk. XII fighter and the first two arrived on 5 July 1943. Hurricane #5584 was not only the first to arrive, it became the very first to fly on 11 July 1943, F/L Wilson. 5584 will complete 22 patrols from Sea Island, until end of July 1943, and continue patrols until 13 November 1943.

No. 163 is re-designated a Fighter Squadron on 14 October 1943, and ordered to re-equip with the modern Curtiss Kittyhawk aircraft on 28 November 1943. The last flight of 5584 is on 13 November 1943, F/Sgt. Senecal. By 19 November, the complete squadron has converted to Kittyhawk fighters. Hurricane 5584, 5586 and 5590 are now flown from Sea Island to No. 133 Squadron at Tofino, B.C., on 4 December 1943, and placed into Command Reserve. The squadron is over-strength with fighters and they remain in reserve, never flown, until 4 August 1944. Hurricane 5584 is now returned to No. 2 Training Command, Winnipeg, Manitoba, and placed into storage at an “Aircraft Holding Unit” possibly No. 401 at Swift Current, Sask.

On 1 December 1944, No. 2 Training Command becomes No. 2 Air Command, and 5584 remains in storage. In early March 1945, #5584, #5377, and 5389, are removed from storage and flown to No. 8 Repair Depot, Winnipeg, Manitoba, arriving 12 March 1945. Modification with radio and one 303 Browning machine gun is completed on Hurricane 5584 and 5389, 19 March 1945. They are now flown by No. 170 [Ferry] Squadron pilots to assigned Japanese Fu-go patrol units, and 5389 is assigned Yorkton, Saskatchewan.

On 15 March 1945, F/O W.A. Doyle, #J22160 arrives from Winnipeg, assigned No. 2 R.E.M.U. at Moose Jaw, Sask., a new Hurricane “Fu-go” fighter pilot. Hurricane 5584 arrives on 20 March 1945, and is flown to Rivers, Manitoba, by pilot Doyle on 29 March, [reason unknown] returning to Moose Jaw on 2 April 1945. RCAF Station Rivers Manitoba, had on strength one Spitfire and one Mosquito for tracking Japanese Balloons, and 5584 was possibly involved in training with these fighters.

Hurricane 5584 is air tested on 27 May by pilot Doyle. No Balloons sighted.

Hurricane 5584 is scrambled at 16:00 hrs as a “Crabapple” is sighted 5 miles south of climax, Saskatchewan. This is the first use of the RCAF code word for Japanese Balloons, “CRABAPPLE.”

On 22 August 1945, F/O Hanneson G. J47498 returns Hurricane 5584 to No. 3 S.E.H.U., RCAF, Swift Current, Sask. The fighter is inhibited in November and remains in hangar storage until June 1946.

On 8 December 1945, the RCAF form No. 2 Air Command [H.Q. “K” Composite Flight] at Winnipeg, Manitoba. Assigned aircraft are used for communication, target towing, practice flying, including Canadian “Airshow” flying. On 13 June 1946, F/L Dibnah R.H. and F/O Saidler D. arrive at No. 3 S.E.H.U. Swift Current where they pick up Hurricane 5588 and 5584, flying both back to Winnipeg. On 12-13 July, the two Hurricanes appear in a Winnipeg airshow. On 29 July, both 5588 and 5584 are test flown and head off for an airshow in Edmonton, Alberta. The airshow is held on 26 July 1946, and during an engine run-up, pilot F/O Saidler encounters problems and cannot take part in the airshow. Hurricane 5584 is returned to No 8 Repair Depot on 28 July 1946, for repairs and placed into stored reserve in Manitoba.

In 1960, the new National Aeronautical Museum in Ottawa begins looking for RCAF aircraft to preserve. Hurricane 5584 is discovered in Mountain View, Ontario, where it will soon be scrapped. It is saved and flown to RCAF Uplands, Ottawa, in August 1962, and repainted for public display. This is the most original preserved Canadian built Hurricane Mk. XII in the world, and has always remained property of the taxpayer [Government] of Canada. On 6 February 1964, it went on public display, where it remains today, wearing a British nose spinner.

Today, the Canadian War Museum, Ottawa, have on display an original “Crabapple” Japanese Fu-go bottom [bomb-sand bag] section, without Balloon. Now, if they [Ottawa] could just get this WWII rare artifact together with the Canadian built Hurricane Mk. XII that hunted “Crabapples”, Wow!

Left is part of a “crabapple” recovered at Provost, Alberta, 7 February 1945, and [right] the one recovered at Minton, Saskatchewan, 12 January 1945, and now in the Canadian War Museum Ottawa.

Hurricane 5584 is powered by a Rolls-Royce Merlin engine. Most visitors to the museum take for granted, it was the best engine, and it was British made. Not true, it was the best, but produced in the United States of America!

In 1939, the Canadian Government was in such a rush to support Britain, it signed a contract to produce training aircraft, and in their eagerness forgot about fighter aircraft and protection of Canada. On 9 March 1941, the Canadian Chief of the Air Staff submitted a proposal for the increased of Hurricane fighters for the Defence of Canada, in the Home War Establishment. Canada had no aero-engine industry and they suddenly realized, the American and British produced all front-line combat aircraft engines, and the real shocker was they also controlled the allocation of engines needed for the airframes built in Canada. In brief, there were chronic shortages of aircraft, aero-engines, and spare parts for the war in Europe 1940-41. Up until 7 December 1941, the British and Americans together opposed the allocation of any Canadian built fighters, with American engines, for the protection of Canada. The events in Washington, D.C., after the attack on Pearl Harbor, changed both the British and American thinking, as fighters were now needed for the protected of the West Coast of both Canada and United States.

In September 1940, the American Packard Motor Company, Detroit, Michigan, signed a multi-million-dollar contract to build the British Rolls-Royce Merlin engine for both the American and British Governments. The first American Packard original Merlin 28 was built with the designation V-1650-1 and shown to the American public on 2 August 1941. Canadian Car and Foundry Co. Ltd. also signed a contract with the British Ministry of Aircraft Production for the manufacture of Canadian Hawker Hurricanes for the R.A.F. The first Canadian built Hurricane began flying trials in January 1940, and were delivered to England in the following month. All this history can be found on many websites.

By October 1941, the Packard-built Merlin engines were in full production at Detroit, [Many on the production line were young American ladies] and the second production engine became the Merlin 29. These new engines were shipped from Detroit, to the Can. Car and Foundry plant at Fort William, Ontario, [Now-Thunder Bay] and installed in the Hurricane Mk. XII fighters. The Merlin 29 was a 1,300 h.p. engine manufactured with splined airscrew shaft, fitted with an American built Nash-Kelvinator Hamilton Standard propeller. This American propeller could not accommodate the British made Hurricane spinners, and thus ‘our’ fighters gained a special “Canadian” built-in trademark. They flew without any spinners.

Pilot F/O Gordon Hill began his Hurricane training at No. 1 Operational Training Unit, Bagotville, Quebec, Course #8, on 30 January 1943. His course was delayed by a two-day snow fall, which can be seen in this image, taken around 3 February 1943. This is what Hurricane “Y” looked like, and how Hurricane 5584 should be displayed in Ottawa. England is full of ‘their’ Hurricane fighters, with British spinners. 5584 is the best original Canadian built Hurricane fighter, but to many, a spinner confuses it with a British production aircraft. The original “Crabapple” Hurricane Mk. XII, 5418, in Reynolds Alberta Museum, is displayed correctly, with an American Packard-Rolls-Royce engine displayed beside it.


Canadian Army reports dated 28 March 1945, claim a Japanese Balloon was intercepted and shot down at Strathmore, Alberta. No verified records can be found in any RCAF unit of Station Daily Diary. Two Mitchell B-25 bombers were stationed at Suffield, Alberta, again no record can be found. Tight press censorship was applied to all newspapers, but at times the government allowed some “fake” news to leak out. On 28 May 1945, a Japanese Balloon landed intact at High River, Alberta, just south of Calgary. A reporter for the Calgary Albertan [Calgary Sun today] obtained these photos, but he could not publish until 23 June 1945, and only without revealing location, date, or time.

Fu-Go Balloons in Canada

Released in Japan, during normal winter wind conditions, the Japanese Fire Balloons took approximately 70 hours to reach the west coast of Canada. As would be expected, most balloons with positive identification landed in British Columbia, with 39 found, the last in October 2014. Once they crossed the Rocky Mountains, Alberta discovered 17, then 9 in Saskatchewan, and 5 in Manitoba. It is estimated that 1,000 balloons reached North America and combined, Canadian and American authorities only found, [or reported] 285. That means around 600 are still out there someplace.

This is a list of the positive known balloons [or parts] that were found in Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba, from 1 January 1945 to 15 June 45. March was clearly the month most balloons appeared over the Prairies, and when four Hurricane fighter were flying patrols.
1 January 1945 Stony Rapids, Sask.
12 January 1945 Minton, Sask.
7 February 1945 Provost, Alberta.
9 February 1945 Moose Jaw, Sask.
22 February 1945 Manyberries [Lethbridge] Alberta.
22 February 1945 Porcupine Plains, Sask.
10 March 1945 Nelson House, Manitoba.
11 March 1945 Edson, Alberta.
12 March 1945 Oxford House, Manitoba.
13 March 1945 Baril Lake, Alberta.
14 March 1945 Hay Lake, Alberta.
19 March 1945 Marie Lake, Manitoba.
20 March 1945 Fort Chipewyn, Alberta.
20 March 1945 William Lake, Manitoba.
20 March 1945 Olds, Alberta.
20 March 1945 Wimborne, Alberta.
21 March 1945 Delburne, Alberta.
21 March 1945 Camsell Portage, Sask.
23 March 1945 Athabasca, Alberta.
23 March 1945 Delburne, Alberta.
24 March 1945 Medicine Hat, Alberta.
28 March 1945 Strathmore, Alberta.
29 March 1945 Medicine Hat, Alberta.
30 March 1945 Consul, Sask.
30 March 1945 Waterton Lake, Manitoba.
31 March 1945 Ituna, Sask.
1 April 1945 Yorkton, Sask.
5 May 1945 Stettler, Alberta.
15 May 1945 Kelvington, Sask.
23 May 1945 Milo, Alberta.
28 May 1945 High River, Alberta. Reported in newspaper 23 June 1945.
15 June 1945 Whitecourt, Alberta.

Alberta had two aircraft stationed at RCAF Detachment, Suffield, Alberta. Very little has been recorded or researched on their operation. One B-25 Mitchell bomber KJ641, was on strength in February 1945, and reported in articles, as used to track Japanese Balloons. It appears in the Daily Dairy with a number of different pilots, conducting what they called ‘Local 104” or “Local 101” and other numbers. A Boston Bomber BE410 was also used for camera work, and that’s about all I can make out.

On 7 February 1945, a single Mosquito fighter arrived at 17:00 hrs, with a No. 170 ferry pilot and navigator. They returned to No. 1 R.E.H.U. at Lethbridge, Alberta. The Mosquito was flown by different crews and did special tests called F.E. 291 or F.E. 293, and other code numbers. The tests were conducted at 30,000 feet and recorded on film by the Boston Bomber. The Mosquito remained on strength until 4 April 1945, and then left for Regina, Sask. I believe this was all top secret, involving the Japanese Balloons, during the same time period 22 Balloons were found in the three Prairies provinces. Canadian Government officials were very concerned the balloons were being used to carry a biological war to Canada.

About the Mosquito

I have attached here the RCAF Suffield Daily Diary 7 Feb, and end of month 28 Feb. 45. I believe this RCAF Mosquito worked with the five Hurricanes in Saskatchewan, but I have no further proof.

I think releasing this information is a good time and place.

The known balloons to land in Canada up until 28 August 1945, was 88, which includes N.W.T, and Yukon. Historians report the Japanese stopped releasing balloons in early April 1945, and that is not correct. The High River balloon arrived on 28 May 45, and it was intact, after releasing incendiary bombs and anti-personnel bomb, possibly over the Rocky Mountains of Alberta. The self-destruct bomb mechanism failed to work, and the bomb came down in a farmers field, bouncing along until it hit a fence. This Japanese Fu-Go balloon was launched around 23-24 May, then 70-80 hours later was recovered and flown to Ottawa. One more balloon would be found in Alberta in June 45, and two in Yukon. In July 45, six balloons were found in B.C. and one in Yukon. In August 45, three balloons were found in B.C.

Born and raised on a farm in Southern Alberta, I fully understand the winds that seem to always blow in Alberta. That is the reason many balloons were blown north from United Sates and landed in southern Alberta and Saskatchewan. Right in the middle of this was the location of RCAF Detachment, Suffield, Alberta, today a British Army [restricted] training area. The truth may never be fully released.


The last original “Crabapple” Hurricane fighter 5389

The last original “Crabapple” Hurricane fighter 5389, has been stored outside, lost, forgotten, and almost given away to another millionaire in England. This fighter is truly a survivor, in more ways than I could ever describe.

Hurricane 5389, [in Calgary today] was taken out of No. 2 Reserve Equipment Maintenance Unit, RCAF, Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, in March 1945. It was flown to No. 8 Repair Depot, at Winnipeg, Manitoba, 12 March 1945, along with #5377 and #5584. [in Ottawa today] The modification of radio and one .303 Browning machine gun was completed on 14 March, and No. 170 [Ferry] Squadron flew 5389 to No. 23 E.F.T.S. at Yorkton, Saskatchewan, where it is taken on strength, Daily Diary, [15 March 1945]. No. 23 EFTS did not close until 15 September 1945, and records of all activities appear in Daily Diary, however there is no record of Hurricane pilot, any scramble or sightings of Japanese Balloon, just one Hurricane taken on strength. A second Hurricane 5588 arrived on 10 April 1945, and again is only shown taken on charge. On 24 June 1945, a mobile repair party of five, from No. 8 Repair Depot, complete an M.5 inspection of Hurricane 5389 at Yorkton, Sask. The machine gun is removed and No. 170 [Ferry] squadron fly the fighter back to storage at No. 3 S.E.H.U. Swift Current, Sask. The Daily Diary at Swift Current record shows Hurricane 5389 is inhibited in a hangar on 15 November 1946. In the spring of 1946, the Hurricane is ready for disposal, taken off strength by RCAF and sold by War Assets Corporation on 20 August 1946. The new owner is Mr. Robert R. Hamilton, 3915 Montague St. Regina, Saskatchewan. The Hurricane is placed on a farm outside Regina and forgotten.

During his flying days with No. 403 Squadron in Calgary, Lynn Garrison befriended a young 15-year-old who wanted to be a fighter pilot, Joe E. McGoldrick. Lynn would take him to the airport and left him sit in the Mustangs and Harvard aircraft. When he was old enough, Joe joined the RCAF, but they made him a navigator, so he dropped out, as he wanted to be a pilot. He returned to Calgary and began a concerted effort to become a pilot. He obtained his licence, spent many hours as a flight instructor and was finally accepted by Pacific Western Airlines. During the early days Garrison was forming the Alberta Aviation Museum, Joe was a student pilot in training for navigator, at RCAF Station Winnipeg. On weekends Joe would drive around and locate WWII aircraft. He learned that Hurricane 5389 was for sale and Calgary mechanic Ed Fleming purchased 5389 and 5424 from the farmer owners in Regina, Saskatchewan. Later in 1962, Lynn Garrison was looking for Hurricane fighters and Ed was doing a rebuild of a WWII P-51 Mustang. Lynn Garrison traded a set of Mustang wings, one Packard Merlin 29 engine and a Mustang propeller to Ed Fleming for the two Hurricane fighters, 5424 and 5389. The two Hurricanes were transported to Calgary courtesy of Wolton Lumber Company, and placed in the Shell Oil Pipeline storage yard on Edmonton Trail, Calgary. If you are still interested, more details can be found on the website of The Calgary Mosquito Society.

On 21 December 2011, the City of Calgary awards the restoration of “Crabapple” Hurricane fighter 5389 to the Calgary Mosquito Society. The fighter is moved to Historic Aviation Services in Wetaskiwin on 27 October 2012, for restoration to taxi condition. The restoration is expected to be completed a year from now, summer 2018. Today [September 2017] only three RCAF original “Crabapple” Hurricane fighters survive, and two are back together at Wetaskiwin, Alberta.

Next Chapter – The WWII pilot who flew Hurricane 5389, 94-year-old F/O Gordon Hill, from Calgary, Alberta.

Preserving the Past – Paper Kill – History of RCAF Hurricane serial 5424

Paper Kill – History of RCAF Hurricane serial 5424

Paper Kill 1

The general public and aviation historians may disagree with what I have to say, they will argue about the known facts and how each interpret them, but please remember my words are only an attempt to seek the truth. For decades many people have been involved in hiding the truth in regards to the identity of RCAF Hurricane 5424, serial number 44019. There is still time for many people directly or indirectly involved, to get enough courage to step forward and tell the truth. Is that too much to ask?

Clarence Simonsen


This story begins in November 1938, when Canadian Car and Foundry Ltd. were awarded a contract to produce Hawker Hurricane fighter aircraft for the RAF at Fort William, Ontario, [now Thunder Bay]. The RAF flew one Hurricane Mk. I, [L1848] to Canada, and this became the new pattern production fighter aircraft. Between January 1940, when the first prototype aircraft flew, and June 1943, when the last fighter was built, 1,451 Hurricane aircraft of various variants were built. Most of the aircraft built at Fort William were the Mk. X, XI, and XII variants, with the two latter groups reserved for Canadian squadrons. A batch of 400 Mk. XII fighters was specially built for the RCAF and they were powered by the Merlin 29 engine and modified to carry 12 machine guns. They also carried RCAF serial numbers, while all the other aircraft received RAF serial numbers. A total of 30 aircraft in the first production order carried both RAF and RCAF serial numbers.

By March 1942, all the early problems with wartime shipping delays, and the introduction of the new American license built Merlin Packard engines were overcome, allowing 15 new Hurricane aircraft to leave the C.C. & F. plant every seven days. All of the Canadian built Hurricanes left the plant painted in RAF camouflage and markings for the period. The upper wing was painted with Type-B roundel, dark red inner and dark blue outer circle, ratio of 2:5. The under wing was painter with Type – A roundel, red inner, white and blue outer circle, ratio 1:3:5. The camouflaged fuselage carried the Type- A -1 roundel, red inner, white, blue and yellow outer circle, ratio of 1:3:5:7. These RAF markings were standard from 1940 until May 1942. The fin flash was Type – A, 27 inches high, three eight inch bands wide [24”] front – red, white and blue. This was RAF standard from December 1940 until July 1942. The RCAF serial number was painted in four-digit black number on the rear fuselage.

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Hurricane #5398, a March of Dimes [nose art] presentation fighter at Calgary No. 4 Training Command new from the factory in correct markings, 16 July 1942.

She served with RCAF No. 133 [Falcon] Squadron. Tail fin flash is December 1940 to June 1942, size 24″ wide by 27″ high, three equal division of red, white and blue. The fuselage marking is A.I. [Matt] in use June 1940 to June 1942. Four equal colors red, white, blue, and yellow. The upper surface wing marking is B style, red and blue [matt] exclusive to all RAF- RCAF upper wing markings.

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No 13 Photo Squadron Ottawa, in color pattern RCAF July 1942. Fin flash was 8″-2″-8″ used from July 1942 until 1947. Roundel was C.I. used on upper wing positions, and fuselage markings 1942-1945. It was large size fuselage 18″-24″-48″-54″. Serial markings remained the same.

Paper Kill 5RAF – RCAF size dimensions of Hurricane markings 1940

In the first week of August 1942, a new Hurricane Mk. XII rolled off the production line with manufacture number 849 and serial number 44019. This aircraft was flown West across Canada to No. 4 Training Command and officially taken on strength by the RCAF on 18 August 1942. Hurricane serial 44019 was assigned to No. 135 [Fighter] Squadron which had been formed [stood up] at Mossbank, Saskatchewan, on 15 June 1942. No. 135 squadron daily diary book states they received their last two new Hurricane fighters from Fort William, on 18 August, to bring the squadron total to 24 aircraft. These last two aircraft, Fort William manufacture numbers 849 and 850 received RCAF serial numbers 5424 and 5425. Hurricane Mk. XII 849, serial 44019, RCAF serial 5424 received the unit code letter “Z” and a fighting image of a “Bulldog” was painted on the aircraft nose.

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This image was copied from the original No. 135 (F) Squadron operations log book collection of ground crew member Palmer Dahl, Victoria, B.C., 2001.

Five Walt Disney artists created over 1,200 military insignia during World War Two, they were paid in full by Walt, who also instructed them to design and paint insignia for all branches of the fighting forces, including all Allied forces. Officially and unofficially this Disney insignia impacted aviation nose art in many forms during World War Two, including squadrons in the RCAF.

In the 26 May 1941 issue of LIFE magazine, the full story of Disney insignia was revealed to the American and Canadian public, complete with new released samples of U.S. military art insignia.

America was not officially involved in WWII, however a large number of U.S. nationals [over 6,000] were now serving in the RCAF and a special group had formed an All-American “Eagle” No. 71 Squadron in the Royal Air Force fighting for England. This LIFE article showed for the first time this special insignia created by Disney for the American Eagle Squadron. The art featured an American eagle in a fighting stance wearing boxing gloves over the “Eagle Squadron” insignia, clearly showing Americans had entered the ring [unofficially] to fight Nazi German world oppression. This was designed for No. 71 Squadron, formed at Church Fenton on 19 September 1940, and was re-designated 334th Squadron, 4th Pursuit Group, USAAF on 29 Sept. 1942.

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On 27 September 1950, this Disney WWII emblem became the official insignia of the 334th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron of the USAAF stationed at Johnson Air Force Base, Japan. It flew on the F-86 during the Korean war, the F-100 and F-105 in Japan and returned to United States on 8 December 1957.

This single Eagle Squadron insignia left a huge impact on WWII aviation nose art in Canada and England. A second Disney insignia, “Pugnacious Bulldog” was created for the American 62nd Pursuit Squadron stationed at Charlotte, N.C., and this also featured a ‘Bulldog’ in a boxing stance.

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This attracted the attention of Canadian pilot FL./Sgt. Al Harley who [unofficially] adapted this fighting Bulldog image to the newly formed RCAF 135 [F] Squadron. This new fighter squadron was taking the early fight to the Japanese in the Home Defense of the West Coast of Canada.

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This Walt Disney emblem was officially approved for use by the 56th Pursuit-Fighter Group, 62nd Interceptor squadron on 18 June 1943. It arrived at Kings Cliffe, England, January 1943, serving at Horsham St. Faith, Halesworth, and Boxted, England, returning to U.S. on 16 October 1945. On 16 August 1943, this same Bulldog emblem jointed the United States Alaska command, RCAF “Y” Wing fighting the Japanese alongside the American Forces in the Aleutian Campaign. Walt Disney had no idea his little insignia was painted on American flown P-47 Thunderbolts in England fighting the Germans, while the same insignia was painted on Canadian built and flown Hurricanes in Alaska, fighting the Japanese. The magic power of nose art.

The very first Hurricane Mk. XII flight took place at Mossbank, Saskatchewan, on 11 July 1942, recorded in diary log book. The very first four Hurricane aircraft used for training were received on loan from No. 133 [F] Squadron at Lethbridge, Alberta. [5385-5386-5389 and 5396]

On 20 July 1942, nine new Hurricane aircraft arrive for training at Mossbank, and each one received the new squadron “Bulldog” painted on the nose. These nine were manufacture numbers 827 to 835 and received RCAF serial numbers 5402 to 5410 in order. RCAF Flight/Sgt. Al Harley is credited as the man who adapted the 135 Squadron Bulldog insignia, and believed to be the squadron nose artist. The talent of this pilot/artist was limited and thus template was made. All of the nose art images are replica in size, with each Bulldog image freehand painted on each Hurricane aircraft port [left] nose engine panel.

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These images appear in the official operational log book, possibly the first aircraft “U” painted with Bulldog. [Palmer Dahl]

RCAF Serial # – Date taken on strength – Date taken off strength – Remarks and Cat. accident date

5402 20 July 1942 15 Jan. 1943 Crashed into sea 28 Dec. 1942, Pat Bay. Killed pilot Sgt. John Luther Cornell, 21 years.

5403 20 July 1942 30 June 1943 Code letter “A”

5404 20 July 1942 8 Jan. 1944 Cat. A. 21 Dec. 1943. Killed P/O Ronald Franklin William Sedgwick, 21 years.

5405 20 July 1942 30 June 1947. Coded “O”, Cat. C. 4 Feb. 43.

5406 20 July 1942 30 June 1947. Coded “C”,

5407 20 July 1942 30 June 1947.

5408 20 July 1942 10 July 1947. Cat. C. 10 June 1943.

5409 20 July 1942 20 Aug. 1947.

5410 20 July 1942 26 April 1943 Failed to return 26 Apr. 43. Lost on official long-range patrol with pilot F/Sgt. Philip Whitney Aucoin, American from Louisiana, age 22 years.

On the 23 July 1942 the Squadron daily log book records the arrival of the tenth Hurricane Mk. XII, serial 5411. In fact three fighters were taken on charge that day.

5411 23 July 1942 13 Aug. 1947.

5412 23 July 1942 30 June 1947.

5413 23 July 1942 17 April 1947. Cat. C, Mossbank – 21 Sept. 42.

On 5 August 1942, seven more new fighters arrive at Mossbank, Saskatchewan, plus the new mascot Bulldog named “King.”

5414 5 Aug. 1942 20 Aug. 1946.

5415 5 Aug. 1942 11 Nov. 1942. Cat. A. 10 Nov. 42.

5416 5 Aug. 1942 31 March 1943. Cat. A. into sea, 22 Mar. 43. Mid-air propeller of 5420 cut off tail of Hurricane 5416 which went into a spin killing F/Sgt. Aulde Mark Beazer 22 years. This mid-air occurred ten miles south of Sidney, B.C. Pilot body recovered.

5417 5 Aug. 1942 30 June 1947. Cat. B. 4 Sept. 42.

5418 5 Aug. 1942 20 Aug. 1946 Cat. “C” accident 30 May 1943, [mid-air propeller of 5418 cut off tail of 5419] and second Cat. “C” accident on 25 October 1944.

Note – this original Hurricane #5418 survives today in the Reynolds Alberta Museum, Wetaskiwan, Alberta.

The mid-air accident took place on 30 May 1943, when Hurricane #5418 propeller cut off the tail section of Hurricane #5419. The Hurricane 5419 dove directly into the sea and the pilot did not bale out. Killed was F/O Richard Haviland Pallen, from Vancouver, B. C., age 28 years. Crash site four miles north of Sidney Island.

5419 5 Aug. 1942 30 May 1943. Cat. B. 8 Aug. 1942. code letter “L”. Cat. “A” on 30 May 1943, killed F/O Richard Haviland Pallen, age 28 years. F/O Pallen had been injured in a flying accident in England on 4 January 1942, and returned to Canada, then posted to No. 135 Squadron.

5420 5 Aug. 1942 30 March 1943. Cat. A. mid-air with #5416, crashed into sea, 22 Mar. 43. Pilot survived the crash.

S/L W.C. Connell took over command of No. 135 Squadron on 19 July 1942, and was possibly involved in the purchased of the first Bulldog mascot named “King.” King was a pedigree English male bulldog born 5 July 1941, number 166762. He was eleven months old when he appeared on the wing of Hurricane code letter “G”, 5 August 1942. The 135 Operational log book contains the original pedigree paperwork on the purchase of King and records he died of canine distemper at Pat Bay, B.C., 6 October 1942, age 15 months.

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The first male Bulldog King with S/L W.C. Connell at Mossbank, Saskatchewan, 5 August 1942. [Palmer Dahl]

Palmer Dahl stated they had failed to get vaccination shots for King and he came down with canine distemper, and died 6 October 1942.

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This forced landing of 135 Squadron, Hurricane #5419 took place on 8 Aug. 1942, and “L” has not received the “Bulldog” nose art marking. This new fighter had just arrived three days earlier. [Palmer Dahl]

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The FL./Sgt. pilot proudly shows his “Bulldog” insignia made by Crest Craft of Saskatoon, Sask. [Palmer Dahl]

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This was the first of three unit Bulldog insignia created for the squadron by Crest Craft.

On 12 August 1942, three more fighters arrive and this is recorded in the daily operations record.

5421 T.O.S. 12 August 1942 Struck off strength 30 June 1947
5422 12 August 1942 13 July 1946. Cat. C. accident 3 August 1942.
5423 12 August 1942 4 April 1944. Lost at Sea 8 February 1944.

The last two fighters arrive on 18 August 1942.

5424 18 August 1942 15 August 1946. Cat. C. 27 May 1943. Code letter “Z”.
5425 18 August 1942 26 June 1947. Cat. C. 29 Nov. 1942. Code letter “W”.

The Squadron has taken on charge 24 Hurricane Mk. XII fighters and three Harvard Mk. IIB aircraft for training.

The three Harvard aircraft are received on 2 July 1942, with serial numbers FE311, FE312, and FE313. In seventeen days Harvard FE311 will crash during an engine test training flight.

FE312 remains until 15 November 1946 and FE313 is struck off charge on 2 October 1946.

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The crash site found one mile south of Dunkirk, Saskatchewan, image in operation records [Palmer Dahl].

F/Sgt. Gabriel Pierre Etiene Schoeler, age 23 years had taken ground crew air engine mechanic Cpl. William Basil Wintonick for a test flight engine check. They failed to return and both were found burned at the crash site, one mile south of Dunkirk, Saskatchewan.

On 10 September 1942, orders directed the relocation of ‘Bulldog’ squadron to Western Air Command and a new home base at Patricia Bay, [today Victoria] B.C. The aircraft arrived on 5 October, the new home base where the Hurricanes would fly West Coast Air Defense of Canada until 6 August 1943.

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The 24th and last Hurricane MK XII Hurricane to be assigned to No. 135 [fighter] Squadron was 5579, which was taken on charge at Pat Bay, B.C. on 6 November 1942. This fighter received code letter “E” appearing in the above photo, which had to be taken after 6 Nov. 42. It was involved in a Cat. C. accident on 9 October 1943, repaired and continued service until struck off charge on 16 October 1946.

Accidents at Patricia Bay. B.C. involved six Cat. “C” including 5405, 5406, 5418, and 5425. [Crash images from 135 Operational Records Log -Palmer Dahl]

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S/L W.C. Connell with the new female Bulldog named Queen, Pat Bay, undated. [Palmer Dahl]

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Queen looking at her image painted on the plywood cover of the No. 135 Operational Flight Log Records Book. This log book was found in the garbage by Palmer Dahl when the squadron disbanded on 10 September 1945. It was recovered and saved by Palmer and these photo images were copied from this same log book. A new Crest Craft insignia [above] also appeared at Pat Bay.

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Mess get together party in operational log book at Pat Bay

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On 1 January 1943, No. 2 Group Headquarters was formed in Victoria, B.C. assuming tactical control of the expanding Home War Establishment along the southern B.C. coastline. By April 1943, long-range patrols began for No 135 Squadron in the assigned Ucluelet Area which was interlocked with the American Washington section to the south. The patrol area was approx. 300 miles west of home base Patricia Bay.

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On 26 April 1943, American born pilot F/Sgt. Philip Whitney Aucoin [Baton Rouge, Louisiana] 22 years old, departed on a long-range patrol in Hurricane # 5410. He suffered engine problems and crash landed near Galiano Island, no body was found and he has no known grave. This was the only squadron aircraft and pilot causality lost on official RCAF No. 135 Squadron operations in WWII.

Hurricane serial 44019, RCAF 5424 flew these same routine Air Defense patrols until 27 May 1943, when it was involved in a category C crash. It was repaired and repainted with new roundels and the code letter “Z”. The old nose art image of the “Bulldog” was painted over and not replaced, possibly due to the fact the squadron was preparing to leave for Annette Island, Alaska. No 135 [Bull Dogs] moved to Annette Island, Alaska, RCAF “Y” Wing on 16 August 1943.

[5424 received the new standard RAF markings for the period. The upper and lower wing roundels remained the same, upper type B, lower type A. The fuselage roundel changed to type C-1, red inner, white, blue and thin outer yellow circle, ratio 3:4:8:9.This marking came into effect May 1942 until 1945. Behind the RCAF serial number a 14” light blue band circled the fuselage. The fin flash remained 27 inches high and 24 inches wide, however the colors [front] red became 11” white 2” and blue 11”. This became RAF standard from July 1942 until 1945.

The 14 inch light blue band painted on the fuselage rear, was possibly for identification in Alaska air space. It is impossible to make a distinction between what should have been painted and what actually was painted in wartime.

The history of the RCAF Alaska campaign begins in May 1942, when the war in the Pacific is running in Japan’s favour. The U.S. War Department had to increase Alaskan air defences at once and ask if Canada would led air assistance. Fact – “Uncle Sam asks the Canadian “Bulldogs” for help”. The Canadian Government consented to lending two Western Air Command RCAF squadrons to the Aleutian theatre of war. They were placed at the strategic control of the 11th American Air Force, and took operational orders directly from American Commander, Major General W.O. Butler.

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This image is from the #135 operational log book. [Palmer Dahl] It has also been colored and used on Vintage Wings website. It was taken over Annette Island, Alaska, while under U.S. Alaska Air Command.

The general’s first order was directed at altering the colors of all RCAF red center roundel markings, each one must be painted over with blue paint, and each Canadian aircraft must have a 14 inch light blue band painted on the aircraft tail. RCAF squadrons No. 8, No. 111, and No. 14 followed the American orders, which possibly confused No. 135 Bulldog squadron in their move to Annette Island.

From 6 August to 16 November 1943, Bulldog squadron flew from Annette Island, Alaska, but they remained under Western Air Command control. Their main function was to provide air support for the City of Prince Rupert, B.C. and they were not required to over paint the red roundel circle or add the 14” lt. blue band. Photos show at least three 135 squadron Hurricane aircraft received the 14 inch light blue tail band, and RCAF 5424 was one of these.

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Direct flying route 16 August 1943, from Pat Bay to Annette Island, 490 miles. Patrol area was north to Ketchikan [U.S.A.] and south to Prince Rupert, B.C. [Canada].

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Unidentified photo recorded as Annette Island in the operational log book

On 4 Nov. 1943, No. 135 squadron received orders to relocate back to Canada at Terrace, B.C. where they remained until March 1944.

The Squadron Operational Log book records a total of 40 pilots on strength at Terrace, B.C. November 1943. These pilots flew at Annette Island under American command.

P/O Adams J.H.A.

Sgt. Aucoin M.P. [Philip Whitney Aucoin, killed 26 April 1943, age 22 yrs., lost on long range patrol, no known grave]. American from Batron Rouge, Louisiana.

Sgt. Battleson R. L.

Sgt. Beazer M.A. [Aulde Mark Beazer, killed 22 March 1943, age 22 yrs, flying Hurricane 5416, mid-air with 5420, propeller cut off tail].

Sgt. Binion M.P.

P/O Boileau P.

Sgt. Campbell W.J. C.

Sgt. Carragher W.

P/O Catterall W.A. C.

Sgt. Clarke R.W.

F/O Cormie T. [Thomas Cormie, killed 24 May 1945, Kittyhawk 861, crashed two miles south of Pat Bay, B.C.].

Sgt. Cornell J.S.C.

P/Sgt. Dewar V.C.R.

Sgt. Frey J.H.

Sgt. Forster D.S.F.

Sgt. Gallinger K.C.

F/Lt. Harley A. E. A.

Sgt. Hattie R. G. H.

P/O Harrison H. L. S.

P/O Hodgin B.

P/O Hope H. A

P/O Hopkiss M.A.B.

Sgt. Jackeen T . R.

Sgt. Justine J. F. P.

P/O Langill K.

Sgt. Lawson G. B.

Sgt. Luther J. [John Luther, killed 28 December 1942, age 21 yrs., crashed Hurricane 5402 three miles North of Active Pass, B.B.].

P/O Marsden K. C.

Sgt. Mc Gill D. R.

Sgt. Morton K. L. M.

P/O Pallen R. H. [Richard Haviland Pallen – killed 30 May 1943, age 28 years, mid-air collision in 5419, four miles North of Sydney, B.C. tail cut off by 5418 propeller].

Sgt. Passmore G. L.

S/L Reyno E. M.

Sgt. Roberts J.

Sgt. Schoeler G. P. E. [Gabriel Pierre Etienne Schoeler, killed 19 July 1942, age 23, Harvard FE311].

P/O Sedgwick R. [Ronald Franklin William Sedgwick, killed 21 December 1943, age 21 years, Hurricane 5404, unauthorized low flying and hit the Katwanga Ferry cable on Skeena River.

Sgt. Smith K. R.

F/O Sproat J. D.

Sgt. Stewart J.

P/O Suddaby A. R.

F/O Thompson J. A.

Sgt. Walcroft E. W.

Sgt. Wheeler A. B.

P/O Wiley B. K.

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The squadron returned to Patricia Bay 19 May 1944, where they were re-equipped with new Kittyhawk Mk. IV aircraft. The first two Kittyhawk aircraft arrived on 6 May, serial #848 and #855.

Curtiss Kittyhawk Mk. IV, code letter T.O. Strength S.O. Charge

848 “P” 6 May 1943 31 Aug. 1945

849 20 May 1943 16 Dec. 1946 Cat. A., 24 Feb. 1945.

850 “D” 20 May 1943 23 Aug. 1946

852 “M” 7 June 1943 16 Dec. 1946

854 “J” 7 June 1943 23 Aug. 1946 Bull dog nose art, 10 March 1945.

855 11 June 1943 16 Dec. 1946 Cat. C., 16 April 1945.

857 “V” 22 June 1943 23 Aug. 1946

858 22 June 1943 23 Aug. 1946.

859 “K” 7 July 1943 23 Aug. 1946

860 “H” 15 July 1943 23 Aug. 1946

861 17 Sept. 1943 21 Aug. 1946 Cat. A., 24 May 1945. Crashed two miles south of Pat Bay, killing pilot F/O Thomas Cormie, age 23 years.

862 “C” 17 Sept. 1943 23 Aug. 1946

864 “F” 17 Sept. 1943 23 Aug. 1946 Bull dog nose art.

865 “U” 17 Sept. 1943 23 Aug. 1946

866 “M” 17 Sept. 1943 23 Sept. 1946

871 19 Oct. 1943 16 Dec. 1946

872 “S” 19 Oct. 1943 21 Sept. 1945

875 “A” 11 Jan. 1943 23 Aug. 1946 Cat. C., 15 Aug. 1944.

876 11 Jan. 1944 18 June 1945 Cat. C., 15 Aug. 1944, Pat Bay.

879 “X” 16 March 1944 16 Dec. 1946

880 “N” 11 Sept. 1944 23 Aug. 1946

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The new Kittyhawk aircraft received the very same “Bull dog” nose art and had their share of accidents.

Many of the Hurricane aircraft were left in storage at Terrace, and it is believed 5424 was one of the aircraft. It was ordered for disposal with No. 2 Air Command on 26 February 1945, and flown to No. 3 [SEHU] Single engine holding unit at Swift Current, Saskatchewan.

Beginning on 3 November 1944, Japan launched the first of 10,000 fire balloons into the high-altitude winds that swept over Japan towards the Pacific coast of North America. On 4 Nov. 1944, the first Fu-go balloon was recovered by a U.S. naval ship, floating on the ocean, 66 miles southwest of San Pedo, California. The first Canadian Fu-go landing was reported on 1 January 1945, when balloon fragments were found at Stoney Rapids, Saskatchewan. At once Canadian and American Governments imposed a total blackout on all balloon sightings and landings, to deny the Japanese any intelligence gathering. Both governments and intelligence officers began to fear the worst, the use of bacteriological warfare by Japan. The very first Canadian defensive measures involved the widespread deployment of RCAF fighter planes on the West Coast, and two “paper kills” are credited to No. 133 Squadron. RCAF pilots. The strong winds of the jet stream carried the 75 pound bombs at 125 to 200 miles per hour at an altitude of 30,000 to 38,000 feet. Even when stripped of all weight the old Hurricanes and Kittyhawks could not reach over 29,000 feet.

On 21 August 1944, No. 133 Squadron was posted to Patricia Bay and joined No. 135 Squadron in West Coast air defense. On 21 February 45, P/O E. E. Maxwell shot dawn a Japanese fire balloon at 25,000 ft over Pat Bay, B. C. in Kittyhawk #866, which was code “R”.

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This unidentified photo was found in the No. 135 [Bull Dog] log book with remarks – “P-40 Pilot.” It is possibly an image of No. 133 Squadron “R” #866 and pilot Maxwell.

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The No. 135 pilots order the third and last insignia from Crest Craft for use in their new Kittyhawk aircraft. This round insignia was also used by Palmer Dahl on his business card.

A second ‘paper kill’ was recorded on 10 March 45, P/O J. G. Patten in Kittyhawk #858 “F”, shot down a balloon at 13,500 feet near Pat Bay, B.C. Two days later Canso #9702 forced down a fire balloon 500 feet over Rupert Inlet, which was recovered intact and flown to Ottawa.

On I April 45, No. 133 Squadron was equipped with fifteen de Havilland Mosquito F.B. Mk. 26 in order to attain the speed and altitude required to attack the high flying Japanese fire balloons.

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Image from No. 135 squadron operational log book photos. [Palmer Dahl]

This image records three No. 133 Squadron Curtiss Kittyhawk Mk. I aircraft at Pat Bay after 1 April 1945. Kittyhawk “X” is serial 1078, and “P” is 1064. The other aircraft are in fact new de Havilland Mosquito Mk. 26 fighters for hunting the Japanese fire balloons.
The fifteen Mosquito aircraft are RCAF KA103 – [N], KA111 – [P], KA112 – [L], KA113 – [I], KA118 – [H], KA123 – [M], KA124 – [B], KA125 – [O], KA126 – [C] KA127 – T], KA129 – [G], KA131 – [D], KA132 – [E], KA133 – [A], and KA143 – [R].

On 9 August 1945, [the day Nagasaki was atomic bombed] F/O J. A. T. Behan and P/O F. P. McKeran attempted to intercept a fourth fire balloon in Mosquito KA132 “E”, but they could not reach the altitude and were unsuccessful. Even the new Mosquito fighters could not reach over 36,000 feet in 1945.

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This image records the No. 133 squadron fighter pilots waiting to intercept a Japanese fire balloon. Kittyhawk “B” – 1057 and “J” – 1945 can be seen in foreground. The new Mosquito aircraft are in background. Photo undated, possibly August 1945. [Palmer Dahl]

Once the balloons had crossed the Rocky Mountains, steps were taken to track and destroy in the altitude above 30,000 feet where they travelled. Two high altitude B-25 bombers were stationed at Suffield, Alberta, to give chase, record direction, speed and altitude.

On 1 March 1945, Air Commodore B.F. Johnson officially authorized the use of five Hawker Hurricane fighters, from nine that were in storage at No. 3 Single Engine Holding Unit, at Swift Current, Saskatchewan. The five old fighters had been taken out of storage between 3 to 16 April 1945, and flown to No. 10 Repair Depot at Calgary for modifications. This involved the removal of all unnecessary weight including all of the 303 cal. machine guns except one. They were then assigned – one at Moose Jaw, two at Saskatoon #5424 & #5418, and two at Yorktown #5447, Saskatchewan. RCAF Hawker Hurricane serial 5424 was one of the five selected to patrol and track the Japanese Fu-go balloons, and remained in service until possibly August, as balloon sightings were reported until late July. It possibly flew from Saskatoon, Sask. but not confirmed.

In 1945, over 50 Japanese fire balloons were reported over British Columbia and two were in fact shot down as “Paper Kills.” Ten balloons were found in Alberta and eight in Saskatchewan, with a total of 285 reported in the Northwestern U.S. and the Canadian North. Canadian authorities forbid the radio broadcast of any balloon sightings and newspapers were not allowed to publish any details on balloon landings. On 22 February 1945, a fire balloon killed a heard of sheep at Lethbridge, Alberta and the farmer was not allowed to talk about it, plus nothing appeared in the local press.

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Due to the fact all Japanese balloon details were forbidden and possibly never even recorded by Ottawa, it is impossible to know if any of the five Hurricane fighters sighted and shot down a fire balloon. It is still possible photos from the RCAF pilots may exist today in abandoned photo albums. Canadian Army message dated 3 April 1945 [COMD13] reports a balloon was shot down near Strathmore, Alberta, on 21 March 1945. No RCAF records can be found on this action but the army files clearly indicate an aircraft shot down a Japanese fire balloon at Strathmore. It is estimated 700 to 1000 fire balloons could still remain in the vast area of the Canadian Rocky Mountains. The latest WWII Japanese balloon was discovered by two British Columbia forestry workers on 9 October 2014. A half-metre of metal bomb casing was under the earth with the tail section sticking out of the ground. It was located near Lumby, B. C. and was detonated by bomb disposal experts at Maritime Forces Pacific. It is amazing to realize that these 72 year old bombs are still actually a threat to kill Canadians.

RCAF Hurricane #5424 was returned to No. 3 S.E.H.U. after her duties and remained in storage until 15 August 1946. Struck off charge and sold by War Assets Corp. to a farmer in Regina, Saskatchewan in September 1946.

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Author image from Lynn Garrison collection

The following statement was received from Mr. Lynn Garrison, [residing in Haiti] 9 February 2014. The history is titled “Grand Theft – Aircraft” and I have edited it to include only the history of RCAF Hurricane 5424.

The collection of WW II aircraft for the new “Air Museum of Canada” began in 1962, and this involved RCAF pilot Lynn Garrison and “my associate, fellow 403 Squadron pilot, and best man, the late Milt Harradence, who retired as a Canadian Appeals Court Justice, after a stunning career as a criminal attorney.” Ed Fleming was a mechanic who worked on the aircraft Milt Harradence owned and flew. In 1961, Ed Fleming purchased two complete Hurricane aircraft from two farmers in Saskatchewan, having serial numbers 42024 [RCAF 5389], and 44019 [RCAF 5424]. “I acquired this Hurricane [5424] from mechanic Ed Fleming, in 1963, along with another Hurricane [5389] now being rebuilt by the Reynolds/Alberta Museum in Wetaskiwin, Alberta. “They were stored behind hangar number 4 at the Calgary airport, and both were complete aircraft airframes, without engines”.

“The Air Museum of Canada [Calgary, Alberta] was incorporated, as a non-profit corporation, in mid-April 1964. It originally had an issue of 100 shares. I held 98; my wife Evelyn had one and my mother Jean Garrison had the other. The structure saw a voting Board of Directors and a non-voting board of Governors. The Air Museum of Canada’s Board of Directors was Lynn Garrison, Evelyn Garrison and Jean Garrison. It was never amended.”

Peter D Norman became the general manager of the Air Museum of Canada from 1967 until 1971, and during this time – “Peter D. Norman had dispersed most of my 45 aircraft, in one way or another. Most were just aircraft I had collected, without much paperwork, so it is difficult to know which Blenheim, Lysander, Cornell, or Finch ended up where.”

All efforts to obtain any information on Peter D. Norman turn up blank. The City of Calgary still holds records containing the transactions of Mr. Norman, but most are sealed. It is clear to see the historical destruction of Hurricane 5424 begins with Mr. Norman in 1971.

The Air Museum of Canada is floundering, the aircraft [45 plus] are being sold [without permission], and total control is being lost. In 1971, a group of E.A.A. members in Regina, Saskatchewan, are interested in rebuilding a Hurricane and they are totally aware of the problems with the defunct Air Museum of Canada. The Regina group is headed by Mr. Rem Walker, 2348 Garnet Ave, S4T 3A2, and he makes contact with Peter Norman in Calgary. At this date [fall 1971] Peter D. Norman is involved with signing a legal “Bill of Sale”, transferring all the assets of the Air Museum of Canada to the City of Calgary. Peter D. Norman understands the two Hurricane fighters are part of the assets, and he cannot sell these for profit. Mr. Norman leases the fuselage, wings, and other components of Hurricane 5424 to Rem Walker in Regina, at $1.00 a year for the next 20 years.

On legal advice, Mr. Peter Norman and Rem Walker sign an affidavit saying a condition on the lease was that no part of Hurricane 5424 was to be sold out of Canada.

It would appear that Peter Norman wanted Hurricane 5424 out of Calgary before the City of Calgary took over all assets, and that was accomplished. The paper work for the sale of the “Air Museum of Canada” was dated April 1973, and the sale was registered and made legal on 23 July 1973.

For the total sum of $1 [one dollar] the Air Museum of Canada was now owned by the City of Calgary, Alberta. From a collection of over 45 original aircraft only seven remained along with four aircraft engines. This was all officially listed on Schedule “A” of the original Bill of Sale. [attached] This is a simple case of the Fox placed in charge of the hen house. Where did all the chickens go?

Only one Hawker Hurricane Mk. XIIA, aircraft AC41, 48084, RCAF serial number 5389 is listed on the original Bill of Sale.

In 1978, Mr. Les Hunt published his book titled – Veterans and Vintage Aircraft, Garnstone Press and on page 193 he stated – “Hawker Hurricane IIB #42024 construction number 44019 [RCAF 5424] is at present in Saskatchewan on lease.

What occurred in the next four or five years is only known by Mr. Rem Walker and other members of his Regina based Hurricane restoration group. It is well known to Canadian Aviation researchers, the Regina group visited the farm of Cameron Logan in Scotland, Ontario, to obtain spare parts to rebuild the Hurricane RCAF 5424 to flying condition.
It is very important to note that Cameron Logan had removed a large number of Hawker Hurricane WWII aircraft construction and serial number plates.

The following copy of original Bill of Sale for Air Museum of Canada, and list of aircraft [seven] in Schedule “A” was obtained by Mr. Lynn Garrison on 10 February 1995.

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In 1973, the City of Calgary becomes the official owners of the assets of the defunct Air Museum of Canada, and just retired Calgary Airport Manager Bill Watts takes control of the new “Aero Space Museum of Calgary.” From the very beginning the City of Calgary did not want the old Air Museum or any of the aircraft. Calgary was [and still remains] a cowboy, rich rancher, rich oil man, rich farmer, controlled city. The new Aero Space Museum of Calgary received no building, no protection or storage for the remaining aircraft, and no money. The ex-RCAF officers involved in the old Air Museum of Canada slowly disappear like rats leaving a sinking ship, and along with them go many aircraft. How many of these men sold and made money from the Air Museum of Canada aircraft may never be known. The ex-Lynn Garrison aircraft collection, now down to seven aircraft, are moved to the rear alley of the new Calgary Planetarium and left to rot in the extreme hot and cold of the famous Calgary weather.

At some date in 1973-1975, one almost zero time Merlin 500-29 engine is sold by the Aero Space Museum of Calgary to Rem Walker in Regina, Sask., for $900.00. The RCAF Hurricane 5424 is now complete and legally in the hands of Rem Walker for the next eighteen years, [1971-1991].

At the time of this sale, Mr. Bill Watts was the Manager, chief financial officer, and totally in charge of operations of the new Aero Space Museum of Calgary. It would appear Mr. Watts possibly authorized the sale of one Merlin 29 engine to Rem Walker. Was Peter D. Norman still involved? I believe the answers to these questions can still be found in the City of Calgary archives, but they are sealed and not for public eye. During the 1992 legal action against the City of Calgary and the Lancaster FM-136, the Calgary lawyers were most protective of Peter D. Norman, and what he said and did with some 40-50 Lynn Garrison aircraft, including Hurricane 5424. Peter D. Norman was British born and had carpenter skills, making a living selling Life Insurance in Calgary. He just disappeared, with bags of money, and I would guess returned to England. Again, it is up to the reader to decide what occurred with so many aircraft purchased by Lynn Garrison.

Lynn Garrison – “Apparently the Regina, Saskatchewan, group headed by Rem Walker, who leased 44019, whose C/N correlates with RCAF Hurricane 5424 continued in its attempt to rebuild airframe 5424 to flying condition. It is known they visited the Cameron Logan farm in Scotland, Ontario. After WW II, Logan purchased up to 200 surplus aircraft, mostly RCAF Hurricanes, which he scrapped for profit. Rem Walker and his Regina group visited the farm to strip parts from many of his derelict Hurricane center-sections, which all contained RCAF serial number plates.”

From 1971 until 1991, RCAF Hurricane 5424 was under signed lease to Rem Walker and his Regina group. They only owned the Merlin 29 engine and in order to sell the complete aircraft they had to change the serial number to anything other than 5424. Only Rem Walker and his group can answer that question.

I became a 30 year card carrying, voting, member of the Aero Space Museum of Calgary in 1980. For a City that prides itself on everything being the “Best in Canada”, the Aero Space Museum was treated as the “outhouse” of all museums. We still processed no building, no storage for the aircraft, and meetings were held in the basement of the Planetarium located downtown.

The small amount of money allotted each year from the City of Calgary paid the wages of the manager Bill Watts, financial officer [bookkeeper], and directors, nothing was left. We were in fact a “paper museum” a total joke to the whole Canadian aviation community.

We volunteers, attended our monthly meetings in the Planetarium basement, drank coffee, and went home. It’s no wonder others took full advantage of the stupidity that destroyed forever, the fact no future generations of Calgary born would ever have the “Air Museum of Canada.”

In November 1982, the “Aero Space Museum of Calgary Association” learned that RCAF Hurricane 5424, on lease to Rem Walker in Regina, was being sold to someone in England for a reported $153,000. Bob Nelson, who was technical supervisor for the Calgary Planetarium, where the aircraft were parked, reported the stolen Hurricane to the Calgary City Police.

Hamilton based Canadian Warplane Heritage had accidently discovered this independent sale of Hurricane 5424 and reported the facts to Bob Nelson, who estimated, when Calgary’s Hurricane was restored to flying condition, it would be worth $500,000. Again a rare Canadian built RCAF WWII aircraft had been sold without permission and by the time the Calgary Police could put two and two together, it was already in England. Sadly the ‘Cowtown’ public would learn of these facts in the Calgary Herald newspaper story by reporter Earl Fowler on 10 January 1983.

Wealthy aircraft collector Stephen Grey had obtained one complete Hurricane RCAF aircraft from Rem Walker in Regina, Saskatchewan, for $153,000. The exact date the Hurricane arrived in England is still not public, but I believe it was 1981. When the Hurricane arrived in U.K. the construction and serial number had been removed from the airframe and it remained unidentified until 1983. The Aircraft Registration records show the Hurricane was then registered as RCAF serial 5547, however this was not based on any correct manufactures serial number, but just word of mouth by the respective British owners.

Finally in 1989, the CAA received notification of the correct serial number as being 72036 and the mystery Hurricane was registered as G-HURI, RCAF 5547. It is still a mystery where Steven Grey obtained the identify of RCAF 5547, but that is what the official CAA documents were registered in. In 2002, the mystery Hurricane was sold to Historic Aircraft Collections and registered as G-HURI. As of 15 January 2004, the Aircraft Registration CAA documents show this Canadian fighter still registered as RCAF 5447.

Today this fighter has somehow obtained a construction number and serial number for RCAF Hurricane 5711. The new owners want historians to believe that Rem Walker destroyed the original complete Calgary Hurricane fighter RCAF 5424 and then rebuilt a new Hurricane with parts from many Hurricanes he hauled from the Scotland, Ontario, farm of Cameron Logan. This may sound OK in the U.K., but Scotland, Ontario, is 2,586 k/m from Regina, Saskatchewan. That’s 40 plus hours of straight driving time, pulling a trailer loaded with Hurricane parts. I think Mr. Walker is giving everyone a ‘Rem” job. A number of Canadian historians are in fact still investigating the most suspicious nature of Stephen Grey using the identity of RCAF 5711 when he had the complete airframe of 5424 in England. Canadian farmer Harry Whereatt purchased his Hurricane XII, serial 5447, for $50 in 1946, and it is believed to be the aircraft that flew based from Yorkton, Saskatchewan, looking for Japanese fire-balloons. Before he died, Harry gave an interview where he stated Rem Walker used two old yellow school buses to haul his Hurricane fighter parts from Scotland, Ontario, to Regina, Saskatchewan. He further stated the center section from Hurricane RCAF 5711 was obtained by Rem Walker and this contained the serial number tag. This section had to be cut up, as it would not fit into the school bus.

You would never cut up a center section of an aircraft if you wish to use it to be restored to flying condition. However, it seems they only wanted the center section for the serial number, which has now showed up on the unknown Hurricane flying in England. How and when RCAF Hurricane 5424 disappeared and then was suddenly transformed into RCAF 5711 is only known by Rem Walker and his Regina group, plus a hand full of people in England. It is time to let the readers digest the known facts and they can decide what is the truth.

Like stolen Nazi art from WWII, this once proud RCAF Hurricane history has been totally destroyed by Canadian and British greed, with no respect for the No. 135 Squadron members in WWII. While the Aero Space Museum of Calgary had a ‘moral right’ to Hurricane 5424, who rightfully owns this fighter? Mr. Lynn Garrison still has the original bill of sale to Hurricane 5424 and should it be sold to a new owner in the United States or Canada, his right to ownership will be challenged in a Court of Canadian or American Law. That is why the lawyers in England want this stolen aircraft to have any serial other than 44019, ex-RCAF 5424. It is reported to be worth $2.6 million U.S. as of 2014.

Paper Kill 42

This 19″ by 28″ acrylic painting of Hurricane #5424 was created at San Miguel de Allende, Mexico, in winter of 2013. It is painted on the original aircraft skin removed from Fleet Fawn Mk. II, serial 123, restored at Nanton, Alberta. This Fleet Fawn was assigned to the RCAF on 7 July 1938 and flew as a trainer until struck off charge 3 December 1945. This painting captures the month of March 1945, when artist was one years-old living on small farm at Acme, Alberta.

RCAF Hurricane #5424 is patrolling the border between Alberta and Saskatchewan looking for Japanese fire balloons. The Japanese launched the 33 foot gas-filled balloons into the warm high atmosphere jet steam and in three to five days they made a rapid descent, which resulted in the bombing of rural Alberta. While the snow covered ground temperature is around freezing, the air at 10 to 20 thousand feet is ten to fifteen degrees warmer. The proud Hurricane is looking to shoot down a Japanese fire balloon, and record a “Paper Kill.” Sadly today this Canadian built No. 135 Squadron RCAF Hurricane fighter history has been destroyed by British “Paper Kill.”

This article is dedicated to Palmer Dahl, original ground crew member of No. 135 [Bull Dog] Squadron. We met three times, first in 2001 and the last time at my home in 2003, where I copied the photos and material for this story. In mid-December 2015, I phoned Palmer at his home in Victoria, to wish a Merry Christmas. I was informed by his daughter that he could not walk, had little memory, and was being cared for in a seniors home in Victoria, B.C. The original operational log book recovered from the garbage in 1945 was donated to the British Columbia Aviation Museum at Sidney, B.C.

Clarence Simonsen